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1775 
The Marine Corps was created on 10 November 1775 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at Tun Tavern by a resolution of the
Continental Congress, which "raised two battalions of Marines." Captain Samuel Nicholas became the commander of these two
battalions and is traditionally considered the first Commandant of the Marine Corps. In 1834, the Marines came under the
Department of the Navy. The National Security Act of 1947, amended in 1952, states the present structure, missions, and
functions of the Marine Corps
1776
The first Marine landing took place during the Revolutionary War. Marines invaded New Providence Island in the
Bahamas and seized guns and supplies. The uniform of the day had a stiff leather stock that was worn around the neck, thus
the nickname "Leatherneck
1798
Congress recreated the Marine Corps as a separate military service
1805
Marines stormed the Barbary pirates' stronghold at Derna on the "Shores of Tripoli." Marines raised the "Stars and
Stripes" for the first time in the Eastern Hemisphere.
1847
During the Mexican War, Marines occupied the "Halls of Montezuma" during the Battle of Chapultepec in
Mexico City. The royal palace fell to invading Marines, who were among the first United States troops to enter the capital.
Marines also helped take California
1859
Under the command of Colonel Robert E. Lee, U.S. Army, Marines stormed the United States arsenal
at Harper's Ferry to put down an attempted slave revolt lead by abolitionist John Brown.
1861
Marines saw limited action during the Civil War. Due to resignations, an aging officer corps, and inadequate
personnel, effectiveness was hindered. Marines served primarily with naval detachments at sea manning ship’s gun,
rarely conducting operations ashore
1868
The Marine Corps adopted an emblem that consisted of an eagle, a globe, and an anchor. Brigadier General
Jacob Zeilin, 7th Commandant, modified the British (Royal) Marine emblem to depict the Marines as both American and
maritime. The globe and anchor signify worldwide service and sea traditions. The spread eagle is a symbol of the Nation
itself.
1883
The official motto of the Marine Corps, “Semper Fidelis,” (Latin for “Always Faithful”) was adopted. The phrase
is more commonly heard as its abbreviation, “Semper Fi”.
1898
In response to a declaration of war against Spain, Marines conducted offensive operations in the Pacific and Cuba.
Marine actions led to the establishment of several naval installations overseas.
1900
In support of foreign policy, Marines from ships on the Asiatic station defended the American Legation in
Peking, China during the Boxer Rebellion. The Marines were part of a multinational defense force that protected the Legation Quarter against attack. This small defense force held out against the Boxers until a relief force was able to
reach Peking and end the rebellion.
1901
During the years 1901 to 1934, the Marine Corps was increasingly used to quell disturbances throughout
the world. From the Far East to the Caribbean, Marines landed and put down insurrections, guarded and protected
American lives and property, and restored order. Due to the extensive use of Marines in various countries and locations
in the Caribbean, these actions come to be known as the "Banana Wars
1913
The Marine Corps established its aviation unit. Marine Major Alfred A. Cunningham was the first pilot.
1917
Marines landed as part of the American force in France. Marines, participating in eight distinct operations, distinguished
themselves and were awarded a number of decorations, among them the French Fourragere still worn by members of the 5th and
6th Marines.
1933
The Marine Corps was reorganized into the Fleet Marine Force, formally establishing the "command and
administrative relations" between the Fleet and the Marine Corps. The Marine Corps Equipment Board was established at
Quantico, Virginia, and Marines began to devote long hours to testing and developing materials for landing operations and
expeditionary service.
1941
The United States was thrust into war following the devastating surprise attack on Pearl Harbor by Japanese forces.
Marines defended against this attack and similar attacks throughout the Pacific during the opening states of the war. The
Marine Corps was the principal force utilized by the allies in execution of a strategy of “island hopping” campaigns.
The earlier development of amphibious doctrine proved to be invaluable in carrying out this strategy. The strength of the
Marine Corps reached nearly 500,000 during World War II.
1950
Conflict in Korea tested Marine Corps combat readiness. The Marines responded to the attack by North Korean forces by
quickly assembling the First Marine Provisional Brigade from the understrength 1st Marine Division. These Marines shipped
out and were later used to rescue the crumbling Pusan Perimeter. Marine forces further displayed their combat readiness and
versatility by making an amphibious landing over the seawalls at Inchon. Marine aviators flew helicopters for the first time in
battle.
1958
The Marine Corps completed reorganizing the combat structure of its Fleet Marine Force. The Marines created
units equipped to conduct landing operations in either atomic or nonatomic warfare. The Marine Corps had the ability for
the Fleet to go where it was needed, to stay there, and to readily project its power ashore as the cutting edge of sea power.
This concept was put to use when Marines landed near Beirut, Lebanon at the request of the Lebanese government to
support its army against internal strife. The Marines helped stabilize the situation and were withdrawn after a few months.
1965
Marines landed in South Vietnam, which committed the Marine Corps to the longest war in its history. Marines
conducted numerous large scale offensive operations throughout the course of the war, as well as participating in the
pacification program designed to win the support of the local populace. Also, in response to an attempted coup of the
local government, Marines landed in the Dominican Republic to evacuate and protect U.S. citizens. The Marines formed
the core of a multinational force that quickly restored the peace.
1982
Marines deployed to Lebanon as part of a multinational peacekeeping force in an effort to restore peace and order
to this war-torn country. This action further displayed the Marine concept of a "Force in Readiness." On 23 October 1983,
a suicide truck bomb attack on the headquarters building killed 241 Americans and wounded 70 others. The last Marine
unit withdrew in July of 1984.
1983
Following assassination of the Prime Minister and violent overthrow of the government of Grenada, Marines
participated in Urgent Fury, a joint military operation in response to a request for intervention from neighboring
Caribbean nations. The Marines' rapid response led to the securing of the island and the safeguarding of hundreds of
American citizens living there.
1989
In response to the increasing unrest in Panama, the President of the United States ordered a joint military operation,
Just Cause, to overthrow the military government of Panama headed by General Manuel Noriega. United States forces,
including Marines, accomplished this mission and installed a civilian government. This same government had been denied
office after free elections were illegally declared invalid by Noriega's government. General Noriega, under indictment in the
United States for drug trafficking and racketeering, was arrested and sent to the United States for trial.
1990
Following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraqi forces, Operation Desert Shield was launched. This joint military operation
was designed to halt the advance of Iraqi forces and to position multinational forces assembled for possible offensive
operations to expel the invading force. This operation validated the Marine Corps Maritime Prepositioning Force (MPF)
concept and enacted the plan of tailoring units to accomplish a mission as part of a Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF).
1991
Operation Desert Storm was launched after the Iraqi government refused to comply with United Nations resolutions.
Marine aviation was heavily used when the air phase commenced in January of 1991. When massive bombing failed to
dislodge Iraqi forces, Marine ground forces swept into Kuwait and liberated the country, causing severe damage to the
Iraqi military capability.
The BATTLE OF BLADENSBURG
In August of 1814, 103 Marines and 400 sailors made a vain attempt to block a force of
4,000 disciplined British troops from advancing on Washington. The Marines stopped three headlong charges before finally
being outflanked and driven back. The British then moved down Bladensburg Road to Washington where they burned a number
of public buildings before retiring to their vessels in the Chesapeake Bay
The BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS
In January of 1815, Marines under the command of General Andrew Jackson soundly
defeated British Forces that were attacking the city of New Orleans. The British lost approximately 2,000 men while American
losses were less than 100.
The BATTLE OF BELLEAU WOOD
Marines fought one of their greatest battles in history at Belleau Wood, France during
World War I. Marines helped to crush a German offensive at Belleau Wood that threatened Paris. In honor of the Marines who
fought there, the French renamed the area "the Wood of the Brigade of Marines." German intelligence evaluated the Marines as
"storm troops" -- the highest rating on the enemy fighting scale. In reference to the Marine's ferocious fighting ability, German
troops called their new enemy "Teufelhunden" or "Devildogs," a nickname in which Marines share pride.
The BATTLE OF WAKE ISLAND:
In 1941, following the air attack on Pearl Harbor, the Japanese struck Wake Island on 8
December. Despite being heavily outnumbered, the Marines mounted a courageous defense before finally falling on 23
December. This small force of Marines caused an extraordinary number of Japanese casualties and damage to the invading
force
The BATTLE OF GUADALCANAL
On 7 August 1942, the 1st Marine Division landed on the beaches of Guadalcanal in the
Solomon Islands and launched the first United States land offensive of World War II. This battle marked the first combat test of
the new amphibious doctrine, and also provided a crucial turning point of the war in the Pacific by providing a base to launch
further invasions of Japanese-held islands. Amphibious landings followed on the remaining Solomon Islands including New
Georgia, Choiseul (Feint), and Bougainville.
iam
(adv.) now, by now, by then, already
The BATTLE OF THE MARIANA ISLANDS
Due to the need for airfields by the Air Force and advanced bases for the Navy,
the Marianas were invaded. Landings on the islands of Saipan, Guam, and Tinian accomplished this. During June and July of
1943, Lieutenant General Holland M. Smith led a combined invasion force of Marines and soldiers that totaled over 136,000.
This was the greatest number of troops up to that time to operate in the field under Marine command.
The BATTLE OF IWO JIMA:
On 19 February 1945, Marines landed on Iwo Jima in what was the largest all-Marine battle in
history. It was also the bloodiest in Marine Corps history. The Marine Corps suffered over 23,300 casualties. The capture of Iwo Jima greatly increased the air support and bombing operations against the Japanese home islands. Of the savage battle,
Admiral Chester W. Nimitz said, "Among the Americans who served on Iwo Island, uncommon valor was a common virtue."
The BATTLE OF OKINAWA
In April of 1945, Marines and Soldiers landed and secured the island of Okinawa. This marked
the last large action of World War II. Due to the death of the Army commander, Major General Roy S. Geiger assumed
command of the 10th Army and became the only Marine officer ever to have commanded a field Army.
The BATTLE OF THE CHOSIN RESERVOIR
After pushing far into North Korea during November of 1950, Marines were
cut off after the Chinese Communist Forces entered the war. Despite facing a 10-division force sent to annihilate them, Marines
smashed seven enemy divisions in their march from the Chosin Reservoir. The major significance of this retrograde movement
was that Marines brought out all operable equipment, properly evacuated their wounded and dead, and maintained tactical
integrity.
The SECOND BATTLE OF KHE SANH
In January of 1968, Marines defended the firebase at Khe Sanh from an attack force
of two North Vietnamese Army (NVA) divisions. Despite heavy bombardment, the Marines held out for over two and a half
months before finally forcing the enemy forces to withdraw
The BATTLE OF HUE CITY
During the Vietnamese holiday of Tet in January of 1968, Communist forces launched a surprise
offensive by infiltrating large numbers of their troops into the major population centers of Hue City, South Vietnam. A near
division-size unit of NVA troops occupied the city of Hue and the Citadel. Marines fought in built-up areas for the first time
since the Korean War foregoing the application of heavy arms to minimize civilian casualties. Fighting was house-to-house with
progress measured in yards. The city was secured on 25 February 1968
PRESLEY NEVILLE O'BANNON
First Lieutenant O'Bannon is remembered for heroism in the battle for the harbor fortress of
Derna (Tripoli) in the Mediterranean. O'Bannon's Marines were the first U.S. forces to hoist the flag over territory in the Old
World. The "Mameluke" sword, carried by Marine officers today, was presented to O'Bannon in 1805.
ARCHIBALD HENDERSON
Brevet Brigadier General Archibald Henderson became Commandant in 1820 and held his
command for 39 years until his death in 1859. General Henderson led the Corps through the Indian Wars, the War with Mexico,
the opening of China, and the disorders in Central America. The "Grand Old Man of the Marine Corps," as he is often called,
introduced higher standards of personal appearance, training, discipline, and strived to have the Marine Corps known as a
professional military force, capable of more than just sea and guard duties.
JOHN H. QUICK
Sergeant Major Quick is remembered for his performance at Cuzco Well (Guantanamo Bay, Cuba) where he
participated in an operation to seize an advanced base for the Atlantic Fleet battalion of Marines. The Sergeant Major won the
Medal of Honor for semaphoring for an emergency lift of the naval bombardment while under Spanish and American shellfire.
The landing at Guantanamo demonstrated the usefulness of Marines as assault troops. When employed with the fleet, Marines
gave added strength for the capture and defense of advanced bases, becoming a primary mission of the Marine Corps (1898).
DANIEL DALY
Sergeant Major Daly is recognized for earning two Medals of Honor: (1) Chinese Boxer Rebellion and (2)
First Caco War in Haiti. When his unit had been pinned down and their attack was stalled during the Battle of Belleau Wood,
then Gunnery Sergeant Daly yelled to his men, "Come on, you sons of a b-----, do you want to live forever?"
SMEDLEY D. BUTLER
Major Butler is recognized for earning two Medals of Honor: (1) Veracruz and (2) First Caco War in
Haiti. By the end of 1916, the Marine Corps was recognized as a national force in readiness and for leadership gained from
continual combat and expeditionary experience.
JOHN A. LEJEUNE
Major General Lejeune served as 13th Commandant of the Marine Corps, 1920-1929. LeJeune was the
first Marine officer ever to command an army division in combat in France during World War I (1918).
LEWIS B. ("CHESTY") PULLER
Lieutenant General Puller served in Nicaragua through several periods of political unrest and
rebellious activity. Puller and a force of about 32 Marines became famous for their ability to engage rebel groups and bandits
while scouring the jungles in a wide area of Nicaragua to the Honduran border. Puller became known as the "Tiger of the
Mountains" (1930). The Marine Corps' mascot, an English bulldog named "Chesty," is named for this brave and fine Marine
Corps officer.
JOSEPH L. FOSS.
Captain Foss was a Marine pilot instrumental in taking the Japanese airfield at Guadalcanal. For his
participation, he was awarded the Medal of Honor. By the end of World War II, Foss was the second-ranking Marine ace, with
26 victories ("kills") to his credit (1942).
GREGORY R. ("PAPPY") BOYINGTON
Major Boyington is recognized for Marine prowess in aerial dogfights. "Pappy"
commanded VMH-214, the "Black Sheep," during World War II. By the end of the War, the Major was recognized as the
Marine Corps' top ranking flying ace with 28 victories ("kills") (1945).
IRA H. HAYES
The Fifth Amphibious Corps of Marines, commanded by Major General Harry Schmidt, was assigned to take
Iwo Jima. Corporal Ira Hayes, a Pima Indian, was one of the Marines immortalized in the now famous photograph (not shown)
taken of the second flag raising incident on Mount Suribachi shortly after the Japanese stronghold was taken on 23 February
1945
OPHA MAE JOHNSON
Private Johnson became the Marine Corps' first enlisted woman on 13 August 1918. Her enlistment
was a reflection of the dramatic changes in the status of women brought about by the entry of the United States into World War
I. Marine Reserve (F) was the official title by which the Marine Corps' first enlisted women were known. They were better
known as "skirt Marines" and "Marinettes
ANNIE L. GRIMES
CWO Grimes was the third black woman to become a Marine and the first black woman officer to retire
after her full 20 years.
MARGARET A. BREWER
Brigadier General Brewer, then a Colonel, served as the Director of Women Marines (WM) during
the period 1973-1977. She was the seventh and last director of WM, the only post-World War woman to hold the position.
Margaret Brewer became the Marine Corps' first woman general officer on 11 May 1978.
MOLLY MARINE
"Molly," a monument in New Orleans to women, who served as Marines, was dedicated on the Marine
Corps birthday in 1943. The first statue of a woman in uniform anywhere in the world was that of Joan D'Arc, in full armor, in
Orleans, France; it is only fitting that the first statue of a woman in uniform in the United States resides in New Orleans.
State the significance of the Marine Corps emblem
a. The emblem consists of an eagle clenching the Marine Corps motto in its beak, the globe (Western Hemisphere), and the anchor.
The emblem was adopted from the British (Royal) Marines and was modified by Brigadier General Jacob Zeilin in 1868 to depict
the Marines as both American and maritime. The illustration below shows the Marine Corps emblem.
b. The globe and anchor signify the worldwide service and sea traditions.
c. The spread eagle represents the nation itself.
d. The motto, "Semper Fidelis" is Latin for "Always Faithful."
State the significance of the scarlet trouser stripe
Officers and NCOs have intermittently worn scarlet stripes (blood stripe) on dress trousers ever since the early days of the Marine
Corps. It is said that the right to wear scarlet stripes was conferred on the Marine Corps after the Battle of Chapultepec, during
the Mexican War, in honor of Marines killed or wounded during the action. The initial uniform trousers issued in 1798 after the
reconstitution of the Marine Corps had scarlet piping.
State the significance of the quatrefoil
The quatrefoil (the cross-shaped braid atop officers frame-type "barracks" caps) has been worn ever since 1859. The design is of
French origin. It is a distinguishing part of the Marine officer's uniform. Popular belief tells us that in the mid-1800s, crossed
pieces of rope were sewn to the top of officer's covers so that sharpshooters in the ship's riggings could readily identify them
State the significance of the Mameluke sword
The sword carried by officers of the Marine Corps has a history that is nearly as old as the Marine Corps itself. Its design is
unique in the American services. Today, it stands as the single weapon of the longest continuous use in American arms.
Officially prescribed in 1862, this sword has a distinctive Mameluke hilt that was first introduced by Marine officers stationed
aboard ships of the Mediterranean Squadron during the Barbary Wars, 1801-1807. The sword of the Mameluke’s had a curved
scimitar blade and a uniquely shaped handle that is now especially identified with the U.S. Marines.
State the significance of the NCO sword
Noncommissioned officers of the Marine Corps are the only NCOs in any branch of the regular U.S. Armed Forces who still have
the privilege of carrying swords. In addition, they have the unique position of being the only NCOs authorized to carry what is
basically a commissioned officer's weapon. The sword is the personification of the military tradition and has been entrusted to
those most responsible for maintaining it. Except for the famous Mameluke hilted sword of the Marine commissioned officers,
the Marine NCO sword rates as the oldest U.S. weapon used. While its use is now limited by regulations to ceremonial
occasions, the sword still represents " esprit de corps
State the significance of the French Fourragere.
The Fourragere was awarded by the French Ministry of War to those units which were cited two or more times in the French
Order’s of the Army, and when awarded, became part of the cited unit’s uniform. The 5th and 6th Marine Regiments were also
cited during World War I, and therefore all Marines serving in these units are authorized to wear the Fourragere.
Explain the origin of the term “First to Fight
Marines have been in the forefront of every American war since the founding of the Marine Corps. They entered the Revolution
in 1775, just before the Declaration of Independence was signed. They have carried out more than 300 landings on foreign
shores. They have served everywhere, from the poles to the tropics. Their record of readiness reflects pride, responsibility, and
challenge.
Explain the origin of the term “Leathernecks
The nickname Leathernecks dates back to the leather stock, or neckpiece worn as part of the Marine uniform during the years
1775 to 1875. Back then, the leather bands around their throats ensured that Marines kept their heads erect. Descended from the
stock, the standing collar is hallmark of the Marine blues, whites, and evening dress. Like its leather ancestor, the standing collar
regulates stance and posture, proclaiming the wearer as a modern "leatherneck."
Explain the origin of the term “Devil Dogs.”
The term was coined during the Battle of Belleau Wood in 1918 in which the Germans received a thorough indoctrination in the
Marines' fighting ability. Fighting through "impenetrable" woods and capturing "untakeable" terrain, their persistent attacks
delivered with unbelievable courage soon had the Germans calling the Marines "Teufelhunden," which are fierce fighting dogs of
legendary origin. The term is belovedly translated "devil dogs."
Explain the meaning of “Esprit de Corps
The "spirit" of a unit is commonly reflected by all of its members. It implies devotion and loyalty to the Marine Corps, with
deep regard for its history, traditions, and honor. It is the epitome of pride in the unit!
Explain the origin of the term “Uncommon valor was a common virtue
Refers to the victories in World War II, especially at Iwo Jima, the largest all-Marine battle in history. Admiral Nimitz applied
the Marine fighting on Iwo Jima to the entire Marine Corps' contribution during that war stating, "uncommon valor was a
common virtue."
Explain the meaning “Semper Fidelis
The Marine Corps Motto. Marines who have lived up to their motto, SemperFidelis (always faithful), is proven by the fact that
there has never been a mutiny among U.S. Marines. This motto was adopted about 1883. Before that, there had been three
mottos, all traditional rather than official. The first, “Fortitudine” (with fortitude), appeared about 1812. The second, By Sea and
by Land, was obviously a translation of the Royal Marines’ Per Mare, Per Terrem. Until 1848, the third motto was “To the
Shores of Tripoli,” in commemoration of O’Bannon’s capture of Derne in 1805. In 1848, after the return to Washington of the
Marine battalion that took part in the capture of Mexico City, this motto was revised to “From the Halls of Montezuma to the
Shores of Tripoli.” The current Marine Corps motto is shared with England’s Devonshire Regimen
Identify officer rank and pay grade in order of seniority
General (Gen) O-10
Lieutenant General (LtGen) O-9
Major General (MGen) O-8
Brigadier General (BGen) O-7
Colonel (Col) O-6
Lieutenant Colonel (LtCol) O-5
Major (Maj) O-4
Captain (Capt) O-3
First Lieutenant (1st Lt) O-2
Second Lieutenant (2nd Lt) O-1
Chief Warrant Officer (CWO-5) W-5
Chief Warrant Officer (CWO-4) W-4
Chief Warrant Officer (CWO-3) W-3
Chief Warrant Officer (CWO-2) W-2
Warrant Officer (WO-1) W-1
Identify enlisted rank and pay grade in order of seniority.
Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps E-9
Sergeant Major (SgtMaj) E-9
Master Gunnery Sergeant (MGySgt) E-9
First Sergeant (1stSgt) E-8
Master Sergeant (MSgt) E-8
Gunnery Sergeant (GySgt) E-7
Staff Sergeant (SSgt) E-6
Sergeant (Sgt) E-5
Corporal (Cpl) E-4
Lance Corporal (LCpl) E-3
Private First Class (PFC) E-2
Private (Pvt) E-1
Explain colors.
A flag or banner, as of a country or military unit. A distinguishing symbol, badge, ribbon, or mark. Each arm or branch of the
service has its own colors. The Marine Corps colors/standards are scarlet with gold fringe trim. The Marine emblem is centered
on the flay with a white scroll below. Marine colors are carried beside the National Colors
Explain standards
A flag, banner, or ensign, specifically the ensign of chief of state, nation, or city. Standards are Marine Colors that are
mounted, such as flags mounted in the Commanding Officer’s office.
Explain guidons
Guidons are small rectangular flags, made in Marine Corps colors. An organization guidon is a company, battery, squadron, or
designated detachment marker bearing the Marine Corps emblem and the abbreviated designation of the unit to which authorized
describe the size of the post flag and the conditions under which it is displayed
a. The post flag is 10 feet on the hoist by 19 feet on the fly.
b. The post flag is displayed in pleasant weather except as stated in performance step 3 below.
c. The post flag is not authorized for the Marine Corps Reserve.
describe the size of the storm flag and the conditions under which it is displayed
a. The storm flag is 5 feet on the hoist and 9 1/2 feet on the fly.
b. The storm flag is displayed in inclement weather
describe the size of the garrison flag and the conditions under which it is displayed.
a. The garrison flag is 20 feet on the hoist and 38 feet on the fly.
b. The garrison flag is not authorized for the Marine Corps Reserve.
c. The garrison flag will not be displayed from a mast less than 65 feet in height
d. The garrison flag is displayed on Sundays and holidays and other appropriate national occasions as listed below except during
inclement weather.
State the customs associated with the celebration of the Marine Corps birthday
a. On their special day, Marines may watch or attend activities such as troop formations and parades. They listen to the reading of
General Lejeune's birthday message and the Commandant's message.
b. The Marine Corps birthday consists of a cake-cutting ceremony. The first piece of cake honors the oldest Marine present at the
cake-cutting ceremony. The second piece of cake is given to the youngest Marine by the oldest Marine. This symbolic passing
of the cake represents the passing of knowledge from the elder experienced Marine to the less experienced younger Marine
State the location of the four Marine divisions.
a. 1st Marine Division is located in Camp Pendleton, California.
b. 2nd Marine Division is located in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.
c. 3rd Marine Division is located in Okinawa, Japan.
d. 4th Marine Division Hq is located in New Orleans, Louisiana
State the location of the four Marine air wings
a. 1st Aircraft Wing is located in Okinawa and Iwakuni, Japan.
b. 2nd Aircraft Wing is located in Cherry Point, North Carolina.
c. 3rd Aircraft Wing Hq is located in Miramar, California.
d. 4th Aircraft Wing Hq is located in New Orleans, Louisiana
State the location of the four Marine FSSGs
a. 1st Force Service Support Group is located in Camp Pendleton, California.
b. 2nd Force Service Support Group is located in Cherry Point, North Carolina.
c. 3rd Force Service Support Group is located in Okinawa, Japan.
d. 4th Force Service Support Group is located in Marietta, Georgia.
Describe the MAGTF organizational structure
a. Fleet Marine Forces primarily organize for combat as Marine Air-Ground Task Forces (MAGTFs). This organization for combat
is within the scope of our specific legislated structure, combatant functions, roles, and missions. The composition of a MAGTF
may vary considerably, but a MAGTF organizational structure, by definition, will always include these four elements:
(1) Command Element (CE)
(2) Ground Combat Element (GCE)
(3) Aviation Combat Element (ACE)
(4) Combat Service Support Element (CSSE)
b. MAGTFs are readily available, self-sustaining, combined arms warfighting organizations composed of Marine forces from a
division; aircraft wing; service support group; and the surveillance, reconnaissance, and intelligence group (SRIGs) under a single
commander.
c. There are three types of MAGTFs.
(1) Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU)
(2) Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB)
(3) Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF)