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20 Cards in this Set

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curmudgeon

cur·mudg·eon
cranky person.

The old man was a notorious curmudgeon who snapped at anyone who disturbed him for any reason.
despondent

de·spon·dent
feeling discouraged and dejected.
SYNONYMS: despondent, despairing, forlorn, hopeless.
ANTONYM: hopeful

Mr. Baker was lonely and despondent after his wife's death.
abase

a·base
to humble; disgrace.
SYNONYM: degrade

After his immature behavior, John was abased in my eyes.
apotheosis

a·poth·e·o·sis
glorification; an exalted or glorified example.

In her heyday, many people considered Jackie Kennedy to be the apotheosis of stylishness.
belligerent

bel·lig·er·ent
hostile, tending to fight.
SYNONYM: quarrelsome

The bartender reazlied it would be fruitless to try to subdue the belligerent drunk by himself.
cavalier

cav·a·lier
carefree, happy; with lordly disdain.

The nobleman's cavalier attitude towards the suffering of the peasants made them hate him.
divisive

di·vi·sive
creating disunity or conflict.

The leader used divisive tactics to pit his enemies against each other.
ensconce

en·sconce
to settle comfortably into a place.

Wayne sold the big, old family house and ensconced his aged mother in a cozy little cottage.
fastidious

fas·tid·i·ous
careful with details.
SYNONYM: meticulous.

Brett was normally so fastidious that Rachel was astonished to find his desk littered with clutter.
gratis

grat·is
free, costing nothing, without charge.

The college students swarmed around the gratis buffet in the lobby.
inchoate

in·cho·ate
imperfectly formed or developed.

As her thoughts on the subject were still in inchoate form, Amy could not explain what she meant.
invidious

in·vid·i·ous
envious, obnoxious,tending to rouse ill will, discriminatory.

It is cruel and invidious for parents to play favorites with their children.
mercurial

mer·cu·ri·al
quick, shrewd, and unpredictable.

Her mercurial personality made it difficult to guess how she would react to the bad news.
officious

of·fi·cious
too helpful, meddlesome.

THe officious waiter butted into the couple's conversation, advising them on how to take out a mortgage.
perfunctory

per·func·to·ry
done in a routine way with little interest or care; indifferent.

The machinelike bank teller processed the transaction and gave the waiting customer a perfunctory smile.
profligate

prof·li·gate
corrupt, degenerate.

Some historians claim that it was the Romans' decadent, profligate behavior that led to the decline of the Roman empire.
retinue

ret·i·nue
group of attendants with an important person.

The nobleman had to make room in his mansion not only for the princess, but also for her entire retinue.
sophistry

soph·is·try
deceptive reasoning or argumentation.

The politician used sophistry to cloud the issue whenever he was asked a tough question in a debate.
turpitude

tur·pi·tude
inherent vileness, foulness, depravity.

The priest's affair with the teeange parishioner was considered an act of utter turpitude.
whet
to sharpen, stimulate.

The delicious odors wafting from the kitchen whet Jack's appetite, and he couldn't wait to eat.