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94 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
management
getting work done through others
leadership
the ability of an individual to influence the behavior of others
Characteristics of leaders
initiative
inspiration
energy
positive attitude
communication skills
respect
problem-solving skills
critical thinking skills
transformational leaders
empower followers to assume responsibility for a communal vision, and personal development (secondary outcome)
transactional leaders
focus on immediate problems, maintaining the status quo and using rewards to motivate followers
characteristics of managers
formal position of authority and power
clinical expertise
network
coach
decision maker
types of managers
authoritative
democratic
laissez faire
authoritative
- makes decisions for the group
- motivates by coercion
- communication occurs down the chain of command
- work output by staff is usually high; good for crisis situations and bureaucratic settings
democratic
- includes the group when decisions are made
- motivates by supporting staff achievements
- communication occurs up and down the chain of command
- work output by staff is usually of good quality; good when cooperation and collaboration is necessary
laissez faire
- makes very few decisions and does little planning
- motivation is largely the responsibility of individual staff members
- communication occurs up and down the chain of command and between group members
- work output is low unless an informal leader evolves from the group
major management functions
planning
organizing
staffing
directing
controlling
planning
the decisions regarding what need to be done, how it will be done, and who is going to do it
organizing
the structure that determines the lines of authority, channels of communication, and where decisions are made
staffing
the acquisition and management of adequate staff and staffing mix
directing
the leadership role assumed by a manager that influences and motivates staff to perform assigned roles
controlling
the evaluation of staff performance and evaluation of unit goals to ensure identified outcomes are being met
skills necessary for nurses to provide efficient care in a safe manner
critical thinking
decision making
prioritization
time management
critical thinking
the mental process of analyzing or evaluating information
decision making
the process by which a course of action is determined. the course of action may be in response to a problem or an issue
prioritization
the organization of activities according to the order in which they should be done
time management
the art of making the best use of time available to achieve specific tasks
time management
involves organizing care according to client care needs and priorities
assigning
the process of transferring the authority, accountability, and responsbility of client care to another member of the health care team
delegating
the process of transferring the authority and responsibility to another team member to complete a task, while retaining the accountability
supervising
the process of directing, monitoring, and evaluating the performance of tasks by another member of the health care team.
RNs cannont delegate
the nursing process
client education
task that require nursing judment
ethics
an expected behavior of a certain group in relation to what is considered right and wrong
types of law
public
common
civil
civil law
law that affects the relationship between individuals
public law
law that specifies the relationship between citizens and the state
common law
judicial decision may set a precedent that is used by other courts, and over time, has the force of law
types of public law
constitutional law
criminal law
administrative law
types of civil law
contract law
tort law
nursing practices is governed by
both public and civil law
state board of nursing regulates
licensure
nurse are responsible for
thier own actions regardless of who told them to perform the action
methods used to monitor health care
collect data
quality review
nursing audit committess
what do nursing audit committes do?
monitor health care by reviewing charts to ensure proper documentation and where you actually assess records
what a nurse should do prior to floating
be sure to get some sort of orientation prior to going to a floor that you feel not qualified to work on. speak with the supervisor if you have problems
floors that are usually self contained (no floating)
OR
ER
ped
OB
Minors can health care for what things without parents permission
STDs
Pregnancy
Torts
an action or omission that harms someone
malpractice
a form of tort
malpractice refers to
a professional's wrongful conduct in the discharge of his or her professional duties or failure to meet standards of care for the profession, which results in harm to another individiual entrusted to the professional's care
negligence
the failure to provide the care a reasonable person would ordinarily provide in a similar situation.
proof of liability or fault requires four elements
duty
breach
harm
proof
types of torts
intentional
unitentional results from negligence
intentional torts
a deliberate invasion of someone's legal right
assault
the conduct of one person makes another person fearful and apprehensive
example of assault
threatening to place a NG tube in a client who is refusing to eat
battery
the intentional and wrongful physical contact with a person that involves an injury or offensive contact
an example of battery
restraining a client and administering an injection against his wishes
example of battery
inserting a foley or IV without consent
not an example of battery
applying restraints to a combative person in the ER; this is for your protection
false imprisonment
a person that is confined or restrained against his/her will
example of false imprisonment
using restraints on a competent client to prevent his leaving the health care facility
an example of false imprisonment
go to your room and don't come out until I say to
defamation of character
a nurse that tells a coworker that she/he believes a client has been unfailthful to the spouse
libel
written broadcast or otherwise published words - any other form of communication such as written words or images.
example of libel
physician paged - as usual this physician did not respond to several pages
slander
transitory statements - malicious, false, and defamatory spoken statement or report.
unintentional torts
negligence must be proven by - must have reasonable and prudent evidence
malpractice
the improper or negligent treatment of a patient, as by a physician, resulting in injury, damage, or loss
breach of duty example
call light not in reach, bed too high, phone not in reach
F L A T
factual
legible
accurate
timely
statue of limitation
usually 2 years from the time of known injury
informed consent - who is responsible for getting it signed
the physician
if patient has questions after the consent has been signed
get the physician back in to re assess the patient
consent for minors
notarized paper giving consent to give care for my child in my leave of absence
when is infomed consent necessary
invasive procedures - surgery
HIV testing
MRI, PET scan with contrast
photographing pt/procedures
living will can be revoked
when there is a viable fetus (21 weeks) until birth of the fetus
which is stronger
living will or durable power of attorney
durable power of attorney
should a nurse witness power of attorney and why
NO - because this is a conflict of interest
ethical theory
analyzes varying philosophies, systems, ideas, and principles need to make judgments about what is right and wrong; good and bad
types of ethical theory
utilitarianism
deontology
deontology
actions are based on moral rules and unchanging principles; do unto others as you would have them do unto you
teleology
a person must take those actions that lead to good outcomes; the outcome of an act determines whether the act is good or of value and that achievement of a good outcome justifies using a less desirable means to attain the end
virtue ethics
truthfulness and trustworthiness are developed. a person's character must be developed so that by nature and habit, the person will be predisposed to behave vituously.
justice and equity
veil of ignorance; regarding who is affected by a decision should be used by decision makers because it allows for unbiased decision making.
an ethical person chooses
the actiion that is fair to all, including those persons who are most disadvantaged
relativism
there are no universal ethical standards; such as "murder is always wrong".
beneficence
the duty to do good to others and to maintain a balance between benefits and harms
example beneficence
become familiar with your state laws regarding organ donations
nonmaleficence
the principle of doing no harm
example of nonmaleficence
always work within your scope
justice
the principle of fairness that is served when an individual is given that which he or she is due, owed, deserves, or can legitimately chain
example of justice
treat all patients equally, regardless of economic or social background
autonomy
respect for an individual's right to self-determiniation; respect for individual liberty
example of autonomy
consent for all treatments, HIPPA, advance directives,
fidelity
the principle of promise keeping; the duty to keep one's promise or word
example of fidelity
be careful about what you say to patients. they may only want to hear good news
respect for others
the right of people to make thier own decision
example respect of others
governing a persons affairs
veracity
the obligation to tell the truth