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64 Cards in this Set

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List the two dorsal cavities of the posterior region of the trunk.
Cranial cavity and vertebral cavity.
List the five regions of the posterior surface of the trunk named for the corresponding vertebrae in the spinal column.
Cervical region, thoracic region, lumbar region, sacral region, coccyx.
List the three ventral cavities of the anterior region of the trunk.
Thoracic cavity, abdominal cavity, pelvic cavity.
List the visceral contents of the thoracic cavitiy.
Heart, lungs, thymus gland, trachea, and esophagus.
List the visceral contents of the abdominal cavity.
Liver, kidneys, spleen, pancreas, stomach, and intestines.
List the visceral contents of the pelvic cavity.
Bladder, internal reproductive organs, and part of the large intestines.
List the nine regions of the abdomen.
Right hypochondriac, epigastric, left hypochondriac, right lumbar, umbilical, left lumbar, right iliac, hypogastric, and left iliac.
What are the viscera?
Internal organs of the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic cavities that are considered to be under involuntary control.
What are the two types of membranes associated with the regions of the trunk and their purpose?
Parietal membranes line the body cavities and visceral membranes cover the visceral organs.
What are the somatic organs and tissues?
Often voluntarily controlled skin and skeleton parts (i.e. bone, skeletal muscles, extremities, and the body wall).
Name the position in which the body stands upright with the feet slightly apart, arms hanging at the sides, palms facing forward, and thumbs outward.
Anatomic position.
Name the position in which the body stands upright with the feet slightly apart, arms hanging at the sides, palms facing sides of body, and thumbs forward.
Functional position.
Descride the body in the erect position.
Standing.
Name the position in which the body lies horizontally with the face up.
Supine position.
Name the position in which the body lies horizontally with the face down.
Prone position.
Name the position in which the body lies horizontally on the right or left side.
Lateral recumbent position.
What is the sagittal plane?
A vertical plane that divides the body into left and right parts.
What is the difference between a midsagittal plane and a parasagittal plane?
Midsagittal plane divides into equal parts and the parasagittal plane divides into unequal parts.
What is the frontal plane?
A vertical plane that divides the body into anterior and posterior parts.
What is the transverse plane?
A horizontal plane that divides the body into superior and inferior parts.
What does axial describe in terms of the structural plan of the body?
Areas or organs along the central axis of the body (i.e. head, neck, trunk, brain, spinal cord, and abdominal organs).
What does appendicular describe in terms of the structural plan of the body?
The limbs, joined to the body as lateral appendages.
What does torso or trunk describe in terms of the structural plan of the body?
The structures of the main part of the body (i.e. chest, abdomen, and vertebral cavity).
Flexion
A decrease in the angle between two bones as the body part moves out of the anatomic position.
Extension
An increase in the angle between two bones usually moving the body part back toward the anatomic position.
Hyperextension
(1) Any extension beyond normal or healthy or (2) Any extension that takes the part farther in the direction of the extension, farther out of the anatomic position.
Abduction
Movement of the appendicular body part away from the midline.
Adduction
Movement of the appendicular body part toward the midline.
Right lateral flexion
Movement of the axial body part to the right.
Left lateral flexion
Movement of the axial body part to the left.
Right rotation
Partially turning or pivoting the axial body part in an arc around a central axis to the right.
Left rotation
Partially turning or pivoting the axial body part in an arc around a central axis to the left.
Medial rotation
Partially turning or pivoting a body part of the appendicular body in an arc around a central axis toward the midline of the body.
Lateral rotation
Partially turning or pivoting a body part of the appendicular body in an arc around a central axis away from the midline of the body.
Circumduction
A sequence of movements that turn or pivot the body part through an entire arc, making a complete circle.
Protraction
Pushing of the body part forward in a horizontal plane.
Retraction
Pulling of the body part back in a horizontal plane.
Elevation
Moving the body part upward (superiorly).
Depression
Moving the body part downward (inferiorly).
Supination
Movement of the forearm (at the radioulnar joint, not the elbow joint) that turns the palm anteriorly (upward).
Pronation
Movement of the forearm (at the radioulnar joint, not the elbow joint) that turns the palm posteriorly (downward).
Inversion
Movement of the sole of the foot inward, toward the midline.
Eversion
Movement of the sole of the foot outward, away from the midline.
Plantar flexion
Movement of the foot downward (also called flexion).
Dorsiflexion
Movement of the foot upward (also called extension).
Anterior (ventral)
In front of or toward the front.
Posterior (dorsal)
Behind, in back, or in the rear.
Proximal
Closer to the trunk or the point of origin (usually appendicular only).
Distal
Situated away from the trunk or midline of the body or the point of origin (usually appendicular only).
Lateral
On or to the side, outside, away from the midline.
Ipsilateral
The same side.
Contralateral
The opposite side.
Superior
Higher than or above (usually axial only).
Inferior
Lower than or below (usually axial only).
Volar (palmar)
The palm side of the hand.
Plantar
The sole side of the foot.
Valgus
Ends bent inward; angulation of a part of the body inward toward the midline: >< .
Varus
Ends vent outward; bent toward the wall: <> .
Internal
An inside surface or the inside part of the body.
External
The outside surface of the body.
Deep
Inside or away from the surface.
Superficial
Toward or on the surface.
Dextral (dextro)
Right.
Sinistral (sinistro), levo
Left.