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20 Cards in this Set

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1. Philipsen changed the name of his theory from “ethnography of communication” to “speech codes theory” because
D. both A and B.
2. In Teamsterville,
C. conversation is laced with assurances of common place among those in the neighborhood.
3. Tamar Katriel studied dugri, which is
A. a blunt form of straight talk.
4. A speech code involves a culturally distinctive
D. all of the above.
5. Within the culture of the Nacirema,
C. a verbalized code of dignity holds sway.
6. Proposition 6 suggests that by a thoughtful use of shared speech codes, participants can
B. guide metacommunication
7. The culture of Nacirema
C. is practiced by a majority of Americans.
8. Speech codes theory has been criticized because Philipsen
B. is silent—even naïve—about power relationships.
9. Which of the following is an example of performance ethnography?
B. Dwight Conquergood’s study of street gangs in Chicago.
10. For performance ethnographers, metaperformance refers to
D. social interactions that participants recognize as symbolic.
Performance ethnographies separate social interactions that are performance from those that are not.
F
For a Teamsterville male involved in a relationship with someone of higher or lower status, communication is considered the height of masculinity.
F
Anthropologist and linguist Dell Hymes called for a general theory of communication that would help us predict and control behavior across a wide variety of cultures.
F
The terms, rules, and premises of a speech code are inextricably woven into speaking itself.
T
Performance ethnographers reject the expository style of most reports of ethnographic research.
T
Philipsen defines the Nacirema culture by speech practices rather than geographical boundaries or ethnic boundaries.
T
Philipsen argues that all members of a culture exclusively use a singular, shared speech code.
F
In Nacirema, speech is reserved for symmetrical relationships with people matched on age, sex, ethnicity, occupational status, and neighborhood location.
F
The significance of speaking depends on the speech codes used by speakers and listeners to create and interpret their communication.
T
Empiricists wish that Philipsen built his theory on more than two data sets.
T