Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/32

Click to flip

32 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Is a quantity that allows one to calculate mass if density is known.
(volume, temperature, density, pressure, or mass)
volume
Always varies with the number of molecules present in a sample of a particular substance.
(volume, temperature, density, pressure, or mass)
mass
Can be expressed as kilograms per litre.
(volume, temperature, density, pressure, or mass)
density
Is a measure of the average kinetic energy of a substance's molecules.
(volume, temperature, density, pressure, or mass)
temperature
I) If the density of a solid substance and its volume are both known, mass can be calculated.
II) For any substance, the relationship between mass and volume varies directly with sample size.
T, F
I) For any substance, solid, liquid or gas, mass increases as volume increases.
II) Density represents mass per volume.
F, T
I) If a substance X and Y have specific heats of 0.2cal/gC and 0.6cal/gC, respectively, then 10g of substance X has less heat content than 10g of substance Y.
II) A substance with a relatively low specific heat will, when heated, experience less change in its temperature than a substance with a relatively high specific heat.
F, F
Two solid objects are of equal volume, but object A has density = X, and object B has density = 0.5X. Which of the following i true concerning objects A and B?
(A) Objects A and B are of equal density
(B) Object B has twice the density of A
(C) Objects A and B are of equal mass
(D) Object A has one half the mass of object B
(E) Object A has twice the mass of object B
E
The specific heat of a substance is approx. 0.5cal/gC. If 30 calories of heat are absorbed by 15g of the substance at 30C, its temperature will become
(A) 19C (B) 32C (C) 34C (D) 60C (E) 90C
C
10g of oxygen gas are in a rigid 5L vessel. If 2g of oxygen gas are added to the vessel and temperature is kept constant, which of the following characteristics of the gas will increase?
(I) Mass (II) Density (III) Pressure
All three
The smallest representative particle of helium.
(atom, ion, neutron, proton, electron)
atom
Gain or loss creates positively or negatively charged ion, respectively.
(atom, ion, neutron, proton, electron)
electron
Particle responsible for positive nuclear charge
(atom, ion, neutron, proton, electron)
proton
Isotopes of uranium always differ in their number of this particle
(atom, ion, neutron, proton, electron)
neutron
Their number in the nucleus determines an element's atomic number.
(atom, ion, neutron, proton, electron)
Proton
I) The periodic table doesn't report mass numbers.
II) A mass number can be assigned to one isotope of an element, but not to an element in general.
T, T, CE
I) Addition of an electron to an atom creates a positively charged ion.
II) Every electron carries a negative charge.
F, T
Two different sodium atoms or ions may differ in all of the following ways except:
(A) the number of electrons outside their nuclei
(B) the overall charge they carry
(C) their mass numbers
(D) the number of neutrons in their nuclei
(E) the number of protons in their nuclei
E
Two isotopes of the same element will always differ in
(A) mass number but never in atomic number
(B) atomic number but never in mass number
(C) charge outside but never inside their nuclei
(D) nuclear charge but never in overall charge
(E) the number of electrons outside their nuclei but never in the number of neutrons inside their nuclei
A
Is a diatomic molecule.
(A) N2O (B) C6H12O6 (C) SO3 (D) NO (E) N2O5
D
Has a formula weight of approx. 108 amu.
(A) N2O (B) C6H12O6 (C) SO3 (D) NO (E) N2O5
E
Has an empirical formula different from its molecular formula.
(A) N2O (B) C6H12O6 (C) SO3 (D) NO (E) N2O5
B
Composition is approx. 60% oxygen given by mass.
(A) N2O (B) C6H12O6 (C) SO3 (D) NO (E) N2O5
C
I) Chlorine is an element
II) Chlorine exists as unbonded atoms at room temperature and atmospheric pressure
T, F
I) One mole of HBr has greater mass than one mole of NO2.
II) The mass of a molecule of HBr is greater than the mass of a molecule of NO2.
T, T, CE
The formula for calcium nitrate is Ca(NO3)2. What is its approximate formula weight?
(A) 64 amu (B) 164 amu (C) 240 amu (D) 310 amu (E) 380 amu
B
An unknown substance is found to have a composition of 9% magnesium and 91% iodine by weight. The empirical formula for the substance is:
(A)MgI (B) Mg2I2 (C) Mg2I (D) MgI2 (E) Mg3I2
D
Value that determines whether reaction is spontaneous.
(A) Gibbs free energy
(B) Heat of formation
(C) Enthalpy change
(D) Entropy
(E) Kinetic energy
A
Quantity that determines whether reaction is exothermic or endothermic.
(A) Gibbs free energy
(B) Heat of formation
(C) Enthalpy change
(D) Entropy
(E) Kinetic energy
C
Indicates the degree of disorder of a system.
(A) Gibbs free energy
(B) Heat of formation
(C) Enthalpy change
(D) Entropy
(E) Kinetic energy
D
I) If a reaction is exothermic it always proceeds spontaneously.
II) The universe favours a negative enthalpy change.
F, T
I) Ice melting is an endothermic process.
II) Heat must be absorbed by ice if it is to melt.
T, T, CE