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45 Cards in this Set

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FUTURISM ideas
-study relationship between art and public, art and everyday life (avant-garde)
-look toward the future, no connection to past (demolition)
-synesthesia
FUTURISM techniques
-use of technology/language of mass culture
-repetition drains work of uniqueness and focuses on music
-make abstract, dynamic patterns representing movement
-analogues between pictures and technology
FUTURISM influences
Picasso (analytic Cubism: fracture objects to create a frontality, 360-deg view)
CONSTRUCTIVISM ideas
-abandonment of mimetic/representation
FUTURISM years
early 1910s-20s
Zurich DADA dates
1916-20
Z. DADA influences
-horrors of WWI
-rationality led us to war, so reject it (esp. boirgeoise culture)
-opposed to oppressive rigidity in art/society
Z. DADA practices
-destruction of bourgeoisie (cause of war)
-move away from inplications of studio/commodity/etc.
Z. DADA techniques
-Cabaret Voltaire: repetition until meaning is lost, mystical aspects (German Dada not mystical but secular)
-emphasis on commercialism over individual, found materials
CONSTRUCTIVISM dates
1920s-early 30s
CONSTRUCTIVISM ideas
-attacking "easelism"
-how does one make art relative to the people in the face of Communism, which abandons private property?
CONSTRUCTIVISM influences
-Analytic Cubism- studying behavior/relationships of materials
CONSTRUCTIVISM practices/techniques
-break from language of sculpture, finding of "zeros" of painting
-use of labout/graphics
-notion of factura (properties of materials), tectonica (technological aspects, though may be faked)
-interventions into architecture
DUCHAMP
-readymade
-art is anti-optical (intentionally ugly)
-makes many philosophical jokes
-indexical marks (represents you- i.e. fingerprint)
-loss of subjectivity through geometrical renderings
-openness of art to random events (Large Glass)
-phenomenological experience
-site-specific installation (ties experience to surroundings)
NEO-DADA ideas
-anti-AbEx (gestural, etc.)
-Zen principles (see eshadow in painting)
-non-heroic approach to life
-randomness of gesture
-art as non-representational
NEO-DADA influences
-WWII, existentialism
-have to distance themselves from realism (suppressed in Europe)
-
NEO-DADA techniques
-encaustic (transparent, waxy)
-play with representations (targets, flags- "peculiar objects" that are physical and conceptual)
ART BRUT/INFORMEL dates
1940-1950
ART BRUT/INFORMEL influences
-WWII ideas of madness, crisis of values
-Surrealism (fetishism, dream interpretation, automatic drawings, cultivation of desire, juxtaposition) + baseness
FLUXUS and HAPPENINGS dates
1962-78 (early)
FLUXUS/HAPPENINGS influences (SHARED)
Duchamp, Cage, Rauschenberg, Bauhaus
-art no longer confined to canvas
-examination of body
-meaning of art as exchange
FLUXUS/HAPPENINGS practices
-new idea of readymade
FLUXUS dates
1960s
FLUXUS characteristics
-international (Japan)
-fixing objects is an act of violence
-artist as unprofessional, dispensable and replacable
-art as inclusive, self-sufficiency of audience
-"art-amusement"-FUN
-question idea of framing
-notion of temporality, passage of time
FLUXUS influences
-artists trying to find mode of working amongst post-WWII movement
-not as corrosive as DADA, but still attacking established meaning
FLUXUS practices
-video art
HAPPENINGS ideas
-try to break through artist/viewer gap
-beauty cannot be made after Holocaust, cannot totalize remnants
HAPPENINGS practices
-installations/performances
SI ideas
-art is a creation of situations that realize daily life
-alienation of world due to destruction of individual in mass media
SI practices
-derive: wandering through city, everything that needs to be said is already there and just needs to be put together
-unitary urbanism (status quo urbanism developed using other techniques)
-psychogeography (how the individual intentionally/un- organizes their environment)
-society of the spectacle: fragmentation of everyday life
LETTRIST INTERNATIONAL
-situationist too, repetition of spectacle through mass media, alphabet is talismanic force
-detournement- reusing mass media to create new meanings (usu. opposed to orig. meaning)
SI dates
1957-72
CONTEMPORARY ART (movements)
New Realists, Independent Group
NEW REALISM ideas
-explore daily life, making installations
-index daily life (actual things assembled), bring attention to a ubiquitous activity
-people consist of the commodities they consume, no internality
POP ART years
1960s
POP ART influences
-growth of counterculture (anti-Nam), emphasis on heterogeny and fragmentation
-movement from painting to "mapping"
IG influences
-drab postwar London, hit by shock of modernity, more scarcity so consumer culture has a large impact
IG practices
-seminars, research, multiple interests
IG ideas
-ideas of future (bright, post-apocalyptic)- tomorrow is something to be feared and anticipated, commodified and mediated
AMERICAN POP ART
-simulacrum (copy of a copy of a copy with no original)
-Warhol also focuses on what happens when things go wrong in shiny new world
-when/how is art different from commodity?
MINIMALISM influences
-Geometric Abstraction (Martin, grids, remove subjectivity, logic of knowing one part of canvas then know all)
-Constructivism
-Readymade
-Greenberg- move away from limits of medium, focus on experience w/ body (phenomenology)- problematizing Greenberg
-no depth, no author, sculptural components or ensembles working with space, repeating elements
-Johns: can be Greenberg but still brings in outside life
-Stella: flat painting but not rectangular, industrial paints, serial logic
MINIMALISM dates
early to late 1960s
MINIMALISM practices
-involve body to see work
-industrial readymades
-construction/assemblage through serial logic using readymades
ECCENTRIC ABSTRACTION ideas
-use of Surrealist tools (language of the uncanny, sexualize everyday objects), part-object relations (Freud)
-
EX AB practices
-use of highly sexualized forms (suggestive)
-gendered concepts (female artists)
-seriality in some works, but more eccentric and sexualized