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65 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Position
A position is a social label that tells people who we are, what our duties and rights are, adn where we stand in comparison to others
role
set of expectations that govern how persons holding a given position should behave
role rigidity
When role takes over ones identity

ex. Military officer/Dad?
role repertoire
the number of roles one can successfully play
role conflict
when two or more roles make opposing demands

work takes away from home, home takes away from work
looking-glass self
the self that comes to us from others; others act as mirrors reflecting back at us who we are and how we are doing
social comparison theory
people have a basic need to know how they are doing; they need to knwohow thier opinionsn and abilities stack up and turn to other people for feedback
self-perception theory
one way we learn about hwo we are is through self-observation, in order to get a clearer idea of our emotions or attitudes we observe our external behaviors
face
describes the part of self presented to others for their approval
face-work
effort spent in presenting face to others
line
lines consist of the verbal and nonverbal behaviro we use during a performance. this is how we present face.
front, Setting, Personal front
our everyday performance takes two parts; the public part, teh stage, he calls the front; Setting includes teh sc enery adn props; Personal front involves costume, makeup, physical charac. gestures, ect
Back region
Backstage behavior; the private area where social actors can escape the critical eye; most people need a place where they can slip out of thier roles and simply be whoever they want
Role Distance
We find a way to let others know the roles we are playing dont completely define us; there is more to us than meets the eye
Role SEts
Ensemble Acting: most plays are not one person shows-the success of the performance depends on teamwork; others who help put on a given performance
Altercasting
Choosing relational partners who will play thier parts reliably; choosing friends who support our def. of self
Mirroring
Another technique to ensure smooth performance, here we achieve coordination by following the lead of our partner
mutual negotiation
both partners wrok together to construct roles that are mutually satisfactory
narrative theorists
believe that we make sense of our world by making up adn sharing stories about it, the social roles we choose to play are reinforced and maintained through these stories/legends
myth
an anonymous shared story of origins and destinies; explain the nature and goals of a country and reflict teh qualities and values admired by its citizens; Politician storys: America is a chosen nation
mindlessness
a state of reduced attention; accept whatever authorities say is true
mindfulness
a state of alertness; have their own opinions, examine thoughts and acitons critically, looking for new solutions and perspectives
social identity
when we conform to standard roles and rules
personal identity
when we resist standard roles or make our own rules
modal self
refers to an idealized type of perosn whose existance si viewed as essential if the prevailing social order within a culture is to maintain itself
self-concept
each person's own subjective veiw or image of him- or himself as a person
personality
each of us exhibits organized, enduring adn characteristic ways of behaving; Personality refers to how sychologist see us, self concept is how we see ourselves
narrative-self
personal myth; concept is fashioned over time as a narrative with ourselves as the main heroic character
psychosocial moratorium
process of trying on new identities without playing for keeps
self-schemata
cognitive structures that organize adn guide processing of self-related information and make sense of thier collection of self concents
life script
relativley fixed way of thinking about the self adn relating to others; the repitoire of events that a person perceives as identified with themselves
self-handicapping strategies
using a lifescript to manufacture protective excuses ahead of time to prevent possible failure in the future
behavioral self
self-understanding that is brought to a situation and helps us communicate in that situation
self-perception theory
we come to know who we are by observing our own behavior after the fact adn then inferring what kind of person we must be
relational self
refers to the particular self identity we normally display in a given relationship
presenting self
the particular self that steps forward and interacts with another person
communicator style
the way one verbally, nonverbally, adn paraverbally interacts to signal how literal meaning should be taken, interpreted, filtered and understood
Position
A position is a social label that tells people who we are, what our duties and rights are, adn where we stand in comparison to others
role
set of expectations that govern how persons holding a given position should behave
role rigidity
When role takes over ones identity

ex. Military officer/Dad?
role repertoire
the number of roles one can successfully play
role conflict
when two or more roles make opposing demands

work takes away from home, home takes away from work
looking-glass self
the self that comes to us from others; others act as mirrors reflecting back at us who we are and how we are doing
social comparison theory
people have a basic need to know how they are doing; they need to knwohow thier opinionsn and abilities stack up and turn to other people for feedback
self-perception theory
one way we learn about hwo we are is through self-observation, in order to get a clearer idea of our emotions or attitudes we observe our external behaviors
face
describes the part of self presented to others for their approval
face-work
effort spent in presenting face to others
line
lines consist of the verbal and nonverbal behaviro we use during a performance. this is how we present face.
front, Setting, Personal front
our everyday performance takes two parts; the public part, teh stage, he calls the front; Setting includes teh sc enery adn props; Personal front involves costume, makeup, physical charac. gestures, ect
Back region
Backstage behavior; the private area where social actors can escape the critical eye; most people need a place where they can slip out of thier roles and simply be whoever they want
Role Distance
We find a way to let others know the roles we are playing dont completely define us; there is more to us than meets the eye
Role SEts
Ensemble Acting: most plays are not one person shows-the success of the performance depends on teamwork; others who help put on a given performance
Noble self
the person who has a self-schema that emphasises consistancy above all else
rhetorical reflector
for each situation a person reflects a new self
rhetorical sensitive
believes there is no single self adn seeks a variety of ways to communicate ideas; think about the way we communicate, before, during adn after we do so
communication apprehension
an individuals level of fear or anxiety ass. with real or anticipated comm.
attachment style
developed in infancy and continue to influence our comm. and relationship behavior throughout life
secure style
images of self adn other are both positive; dev. highly sociable behavior
fearful style
low regard for self is more dependent on others for acceptance, but does not trust others
preoccupied style
person has a low opion of self, but generally positive view of others
dismissing style
denys any need for attachment; low self image adn low opinion of other people
need for intimacy
recurrent preference or readiness for experiences of close, warm adn and comm. exchange with others
self-disclosure
any information you reveal about yourself that others are unlikely to discover from other sources.
aligning action
a statement that tries to minimize the perceived deveiation form thenorm by pointing out special circumstances or reason why the deviation should take place; eliminating useless introductions; freshman orientation
coming out
a self affirming rite where one recognizes ther sexual orientation adn then share that news with others