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110 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
ABG
arterial blood gas
ACS
American Cancer Society
AFB
acid-fast bacillus (some types cause tuberculosis)
ARDS
acute or adult respiratory distress syndrome
C Pap, CPAP
continuous positive airway pressure (for sleep apnea)
CAL
chronic airflow limitation
CO2
carbon dioxide
COLD
chronic obstructive lung disease
COPD
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
CPR
cardiopulmonary resuscitation
CSR
Cheyne-Stokes respiration
ECMO
extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
ET
endotracheal
HSV
herpes simplex virus
LLL
left lower lobe
LRT
lower respiratory tract
LUL
left upper lobe
O2
oxygen
PFT
pulmonary function test
pH
potential hydrogen
PO2
oxygen partial pressure
R
respiration
RDS
respiratory distress syndrome
RLL
right lower lobe
RUL
right upper lobe
SARS
severe acute respiratory syndrome
SIDS
sudden infant death syndrome
SOB
shortness of breath
TB
tuberculosis
TTO
transtracheal oxygen
URI
upper respiratory infection
URT
upper respiratory tract
VC
vital capacity
A condition marked by the presence of less than the normal amount of carbon dioxide in the blood and tissues.
acapnia
Accumulation of carbon in the lungs from inhaled smoke or coal dust. Also called miner's lung.
anthracosis
Loss of the voice resulting from disease, injury to the vocal cords, or psychological causes, such as hysteria.
aphonia
Incomplete, retarded, or defective development of an organ or tissue.
aplasia
A condition in which an extreme decrease in the amount of oxygen in the body accompanied by an increase of carbon dioxide leads to loss of consciousness or death.
asphyxia
The absence of gas from all or a part of the lungs, due to failure of expansion or resorption of gas from the alveoli.
atelectasis
Chronic dilation of bronchi or bronchioles, often due to inflammatory disease or obstruction.
bronchiectasis
a condition in which concretions are present in a bronchus
broncholithiasis
Ulceration of the mouth and lips.
canker
A flexible tube, usually containing a trocar at one end, that is inserted into a bodily cavity, duct, or vessel to drain fluid or administer a substance such as a medication.
cannula
An abnormal pattern of breathing characterized by a gradual increase in depth and sometimes in rate to a maximum depth, followed by a decrease resulting in apnea, usually seen in comatose individuals having diseased nervous centers of respiration.
Cheyne-Stokes respiration
Any of various single-stranded, RNA-containing viruses that cause respiratory infection in humans and resemble a crown when viewed under an electron microscope because of their petal-shaped projections.
coronavirus
acute disease characterized by inflammation of and discharge from the mucous membranes of the upper respiratory tract, sinuses, and eyes
coryza
A pathological condition of the larynx, especially in infants and children, characterized by respiratory difficulty and a hoarse, brassy cough.
croup
A hereditary metabolic disorder of the exocrine glands, usually developing during early childhood and affecting mainly the pancreas, respiratory system, and sweat glands. It is marked by the production of abnormally viscous mucus by the affected glands, usually resulting in chronic respiratory infections and impaired pancreatic function.
cystic fibrosis
an acute febrile contagious disease marked by the formation of a false membrane especially in the throat and caused by a bacterium which produces a toxin causing inflammation of the heart and nervous system
diphtheria
A pathological condition of the lungs marked by an abnormal increase in the size of the air spaces, resulting in labored breathing and an increased susceptibility to infection. It can be caused by irreversible expansion of the alveoli or by the destruction of alveolar walls.
emphysema
The presence of pus in a body cavity, especially the pleural cavity.
empyema
A nosebleed.
epistaxis
Easy, free respiration, as is observed normally under resting conditions.
eupnea
A slender tube that connects the tympanic cavity with the nasal part of the pharynx and serves to equalize air pressure on either side of the eardrum.
eustachian tube
the space between one of the true vocal cords
glottis
The spitting of blood derived from the lungs or from the bronchial tubes.
hemoptysis
Blood in the pleural cavity.
hemothorax
A depression or slit-like opening through which nerves, ducts, or blood vessels enter and leave in an organ or a gland.
hilum
The accumulation of serous fluid in one or both pleural cavities.
hydrothorax
An increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood.
hypercapnia
Abnormally deep and rapid breathing.
hyperpnea
a deficiency of carbon dioxide in the blood
hypocapnia
Abnormally slow or shallow breathing
hypopnea
an instrument used to encourage voluntary deep breathing by providing visual feedback about inspiratory volume
incentive spirometer
An acute contagious viral infection, commonly occurring in epidemics or pandemics, and characterized by inflammation of the respiratory tract and by the sudden onset, fever, chills, muscular pain, headache, and severe prostration. (Also called grippe)
influenza
The part of the respiratory tract between the pharynx and the trachea, having walls of cartilage and muscle and containing the vocal cords enveloped in folds of mucous membrane
larynx
acute pneumonia involving one or more lobes of the lung characterized by sudden onset, chill, fever, difficulty in breathing, cough, and blood-stained sputum, marked by consolidation, and normally followed by resolution and return to normal of the lung tissue
lobar pneumonia
surgical removal of a lobe of an organ (as a lung) or gland (as the thyroid); specifically : excision of a lobe of the lung
lobectomy
A septum between two parts of an organ or a cavity
mediastinum
The layer of flat cells of mesodermal origin that lines the embryonic body cavity and gives rise to the squamous cells of the peritoneum, pericardium, and pleura
mesothelium
Capable of dissolving, digesting, or liquefying mucus
mucolytic
A device used to reduce liquid to an extremely fine cloud, especially for delivering medication to the deep part of the respiratory tract.
nebulizer
Discomfort in breathing that is relieved by sitting or standing in an erect position
orthopnea
pleura that lines the inner chest walls and covers the diaphragm
parietal pleura
A highly contagious disease of the respiratory system, usually affecting children, that is caused by a bacterium and is characterized in its advanced stage by spasms of coughing interspersed with deep, noisy inspirations. (also called whooping cough)
pertussis
Thick, sticky, stringy mucus secreted by the mucous membrane of the respiratory tract, as during a cold or other respiratory infection
phlegm
Of or relating to the diaphragm
phrenic
downward displacement of the diaphragm
phrenoptosis
The thin serous membrane that envelops each lung and folds back to make a lining for the chest cavity
pleura
a sticking together of the parietal and visceral pleura, causing pain on inspiration
pleural adhesion
The potential space between the parietal and visceral layers of the pleura
pleural cavity
an exudation of fluid from the blood or lymph into a pleural cavity
pleural effusion
An inflammation of the pleura, usually occurring because of complications of a disease such as pneumonia, and accompanied by accumulation of fluid in the pleural cavity, chills, fever, and painful breathing and coughing
pleurisy (also called pleuritis)
aspiration of fluid from the chest (as in empyema)
pleurocentesis ( called also thoracocentesis)
Surgical removal of all or part of a lung
pneumectomy
aspiration of fluid from the lung
pneumocentesis
Gram-positive pyogenic organisms usually encapsulated, closely related to streptococci, associated with diseases of the lung
pneumococci
A disease of the lungs, such as asbestosis or silicosis, caused by long-term inhalation of dusts, especially mineral or metallic dusts
pneumoconiosis
The accumulation of air and blood in the pleural cavity
pneumohemothorax
An acute or chronic disease marked by inflammation of the lungs and caused by viruses, bacteria, or other microorganisms and sometimes by physical and chemical irritants
pneumonia
Accumulation of air or gas in the pleural cavity, occurring as a result of disease or injury or as a treatment of tuberculosis and other lung diseases
pneumothorax
A usually nonmalignant growth of tissue protruding from the mucous lining of an organ such as the nose, bladder, or intestine, often causing obstruction.
polyp
the formation of scar tissue in the connective tissue of the lungs
pulmonary fibrosis
an empyema in the pleural cavity
pyothorax
an abnormal crackling or rattling sound heard upon auscultation of the chest, caused by disease or congestion of the lungs.
rale
A calculus present in the nasal cavity.
rhinolith
an excessive discharge of mucus from the nose.
rhinorrhea
a wheezing or snoring sound heard upon auscultation of the chest, caused by an accumulation of mucus or other material.
rhoncus
A pneumonia caused by a corona virus that can progress to respiratory failure and is often characterized by high fever, malaise, dry cough, and shortness of breath.
SARS
A disease of the lungs caused by continued inhalation of the dust of minerals that contain silica and characterized by progressive fibrosis and a chronic shortness of breath.
silicosis
A high-pitched noisy sound occurring during inhalation or exhalation, a sign of respiratory obstruction.
stridor
situated or occurring below the diaphragm
subphrenic
the operation removing selected portions of the ribs to collapse part of the underlying lung or an abnormal pleural space, usually in the treatment of tuberculosis.
thoracoplasty
Degeneration of the elastic and connective tissue of the trachea.
tracheomalacia
Abnormal narrowing of the lumen of the trachea.
tracheostenosis
A nodule or swelling, especially a mass of lymphocytes and epithelioid cells forming the characteristic lesion of tuberculosis.
tubercle
An infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is transmitted through inhalation and is characterized by cough, fever, shortness of breath, weight loss, and the appearance of inflammatory substances and tubercles in the lungs.
tuberculosis
a respiratory therapy face mask designed to allow inspired air to mix with oxygen supplied
venturi mask
The amount of air that can be forcibly expelled from the lungs after breathing in as deeply as possible.
vital capacity
To breathe with difficulty, producing a hoarse whistling sound.
wheeze