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28 Cards in this Set

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what are the functions of the cytoskeleton:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
1. Movement of cell
2. Muscular contraction
3. Cell shape changes
4. Movement of organelles in the cytoplasm
5. Calcium-ion storage
6. Site of enzyme activity
microfilaments are composed of ... and are ... in diameter and is found is all cells
actin
5-7 nm
microtubules are ... nm in diameter and is composed of ...
25
tubulin subunits
intermediate filaments are ... nm in diameter and are composed of ... and function to
10
fibrous subunits
maintain shape of cell
what is the function of filament-associated proteins?
a. link cytoskeletal filaments to one another or to other cytoplasmic components
b. assembly and disassembly of filament monomers.
c. interact with the filaments to cause movement
... attach to plasma membrane and are involved in defining the surface morphology of the cell.
microfilaments
in red blood cells a defect in the actin associated protein, spectrin leads to a condition called ...
hereditary spherocytosis
actin filaments are linked together by ...
cross linking proteins
The interaction of actin and ... in the cytoplasm of non-muscle cells results in movement of the ... along the actin filaments
myosin
myosin
The plasma membrane of cells is mechanically supported by the interaction of several membrane-associated filaments with ... thus, the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton are connected to one another
actin
microvilli and its surrounding plasma membrane are also stabilized by cross-linked ...
actin filaments
The ... filaments of the microvilli are anchored to the terminal web which is a specialized area of the apical cytoplasm of intestinal epithelial cells containing a network of ... molecules and intermediate filaments
actin
spectrin
..., a family of metabolites excreted by molds bind specifically to fast-growing plus ends of actin filaments.
Cytochalasins
... are formed by polymerization of tubulin molecules
microtubules
how many subunits are there in tubulin and they are called:
2
alpha
beta
microtubules are (stable/unstable)
unstable - while it grows on one end, disassembling at the other
how are microtubules stabilized?
by microtubule-associated proteins
New microtubules are form by specialized structures called ... such as basal bodies and
...
microtubule-organizing centers
centrioles
Vinblastin, taxol and vincristine are agents that interfer with microtubule dynamics and are useful in the treatment of ...
cancers
Basal bodies act as the templates that control the development of the ... subunits of ... or flagella.
axoneme
cilia
Microtubules play a role in development and maintenance of cell ...
form/shape
Microtubules appear to be important in the intracellular ... of organelles
transport/movement
Intermediate Filaments (IF) are rope-like polymers which play structural and tension-bearing roles in the cell and a "basket" around the ...
nucleus
... 10-12 nm in diameter and are sized between microfilaments and microtubules.
Intermediate Filaments (IF)
since different tissues produce different IF proteins, the tissue of origin for ... may be identified according to the type of the IF
metastatic cancer
In Alzheimer's disease, neurofilaments (IFs) form ... within affected neurons
neurofibrillary tangles
The Intermediate Filaments (IF) network inside the nucleus is called the ... and it supports the inner nuclear membrane.
nuclear lamina
In the fatal disease, ... individuals make antibodies against one or more of their own desmosomal linker glycoproteins which bind with keratin type IF. This causes disruption of desmosomes between skin cells and blistering.
pemphigus