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240 Cards in this Set

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Idiom (n.)
an expression whose meaning is different from the literal meaning of the words; a language or dialect used by a group of people
Imbue (v.)
to inspire; to permeate or tinge
Impasse (n.)
a deadlock; a situation from which there is no escape
Impeach (v.)
to accuse or indict; to challenge; call into question
Impecunious (adj.)
without money; penniless
Impede (v.)
to obstruct or interfere with; to delay
Impending (adj.)
approaching; imminent; looming
Impenetrable (adj.)
incapable of being penetrated; impervious
Imperative (adj.)
completely necessary; vitally important
Impetuous (adj.)
rash; over-impulsive; headlong
Implication (n.)
something implied or suggested; ramification
Importune (v.)
to urge with annoying persistence; to trouble
Impoverish (v.)
to reduce to poverty; to make destitute
Impregnable (adj.)
unconquerable; able to withstand attack
Impresario (n.)
a person who manages public entertainments
Impromptu (adj.)
done without preparation, on te spur of the moment
Improvise (v.)
to perform without preparation; to make do with whatever materials are available
Impunity (n.)
freedom from punishment or harm
Inadvertent (adj.)
unintentional; heedless; not planned
Inalienable (adj.)
sacred; incapable of being transferred, lot or taken
Incarnation (n.)
embodiment
Incendiary (adj.)
used for setting property n fire; tending to
Inclination (n.)
tendency; preference; liking
Inculcate (v.)
to instill or implant by repeated suggestions or admonitions
Incumbent (adj.)
currently holding in office; obligatory
Incursion (n.)
a hostile invasion; a raid
Indict (v.)
to charge with crime; to accuse of wrong doing
Induce (v.)
to persuade; to influence; to cause
Ineluctable (adj.)
inescapable; incapable of being resisted or avoided
Ineradicable (adj.)
incapable of being removed or destroyed or eradicated
Inflammatory (adj.)
fiery; tending to arouse passion or anger; incendiary
Influx (n.)
inflow; arrival of large numbers of people or things; inundation
Infraction (n.)
violation; infringement; the breaking of a law
Infrastructure (n.)
the basic framework of a system; foundation
Infringe (v.)
to violate; to encroach or trespass
Infuse (v.)
to introduce into; to instill
Ingratiate (v.)
to work to make yourself liked
Inimical (adj.)
unfavorable; harmful; detrimental; hostile
Inimitable (adj.)
impossible to imitate; incomparable; matchless; the best
Innuendo (n.)
an insinuation; a sly hint
Inquisition (n.)
ruthless questioning; an official investigation characterized by cruelty
Insouciant (adj.)
nonchalant; lighthearted; carefree
Insufferable (adj.)
unbearable; intolerable
Insuperable (adj.)
unable to be overcome; insurmountable
Insurrection (n.)
an act of open rebellion against authority; a revolt
Integral (adj.)
essential; indispensable
Interim (n.)
meantime; an intervening time; a temporary arrangement
Interloper (n.)
intruder; trespasser; unwanted person
Interlude (n.)
an intervening episode; an intermission; a pause
Interminable (adj.)
seemingly unending; tediously long
Intermittent (adj.)
occasional; repeatedly starting and stopping; recurrent
Intersperse (v.)
to place at intervals; to scatter among
Intervene (v.)
to come between opposing groups; to mediate
Intimate (v.)
to hind or imply
Intricate (adj.)
complicated; sophisticated; having many parts or facets
Intrigue (n.)
a secret scheme; a crafty plot
Invidious (adj.)
causing envy or resentment; offensively harmful
Inviolate (adj.)
free from injury; pure
Invoke (v.)
to entreat or pray for; to call on as in prayer; to declare to be in effect
Iridescent (adj.)
displaying glowing,changing colors
Jargon (n.)
the specialized language or vocabulary of a particular jo or a trade
Jaunt (n.)
a short pleasure trip
Jingoism (n.)
belligerent, chauvinistic patriotism; war-mongering
Jocular (adj.)
humorous; jolly; fond of joking
Jubilation (n.)
exultant joy
Junction (n.)
convergence; linkup; the act or state of being joined together
Junta (n.)
a small group ruling a country after a coup d'etat
Karma (n.)
a good or bad emanations from someone or something
Larceny (n.)
theft; robbery
Lascivious (adj.)
lustful; obscene; lewd
Lavish (v.)
to spend freely or bestow generously; to squander
Lax (adj.)
negligent; lazy; irresponsible
Layman (n.)
a nonprofessional; a person who is not a member of the clergy
Liaison (n.)
connection; association; alliance; secret love affair
Licentious (adj.)
lascivious; lewd; promiscuous; amoral
Limpid (adj.)
clear; transparent; lucid
Listless (adj.)
sluggish without energy or enthusiasm
Litany (n.)
recital or list; tedious recounting
Livid (adj.)
discolored; black and blue; enraged
Loath (adj.)
extremely unwilling; reluctant
Lobby (v.)
to urge legislative action; to exert influence
Lout (n.)
boor; oaf; clod
Ludicrous (adj.)
ridiculous; absurd
Lyrical (adj.)
melodious; songlike; poetic
Malapropism (n.)
humorous misuse of a word that sounds similar to the word intended but has a ludicrously different meaning
Mania (n.)
crazed, excessive excitement; insanity; delusion
Marginal (adj.)
related to or located at the margin or border; at the lower limit of quality; insignificant
Materialistic (adj.)
preoccupied with the material things; greedy for possessions
Mawkish (adj.)
overly sentimental; maudlin
Meander (v.)
to travel along a winding or indirect route; to ramble from topic to topic
Medium (n.)
the means by which something is conveyed or accomplished; a substance through which something is transferred or conveyed
Melancholy (adj.)
gloomy; depressed and weary
Melee (n.)
a brawl; a confused fight or struggle; a violent free-for all
Menagerie (n.)
a collection of animals
Meticulous (adj.)
precise and careful about details; fussy
Millennium (n.)
a period of 1,000 years;
Mire (n.)
marshy, mucky ground
Mode (n.)
method of doing; type; manner; fashion
Modulate (v.)
to reduce or regulate; to lessen the intensity of
Momentum (n.)
force of movement; speed; impetus
Moratorium (n.)
suspension of activity; a period of delay
Mores (n.)
customary moral standards
Motif (n.)
reoccurring theme or idea
Motley (adj.)
extremely varied or diverse; heterogeneous
Municipal (adj.)
pertaining to a city or town and its government
Muse (v.)
to ponder; to meditate
Muster (v.)
to assemble for battle or inspection; to summon up
Mystic (adj.)
otherworldly; mysterious; enigmatic
Nebulous (adj.)
vague or indistinct; unclear; hazy
Nemesis (n.)
unconquerable opponent or rival; one who seeks just compensation or revenge to right a wrong
Neophyte (n.)
beginner; novice
Nirvana (n.)
blissful, painless, worry free state
Noisome (adj.)
offensive or disgusting; stinking; noxious
Nomadic (adj.)
wondering from place to place; without a permanent home
Nomenclature (n.)
a set or system of names
Nonchalant (adj.)
indifferent; coolly unconcerned; blase
Nullify (v.)
to repeal; to cancel; to void`
Obeisance (n.)
a blow or curtsy; deep reverence
Objective (adj.)
unbiased; unprejudiced
Obtrusive (adj.)
interfering; meddlesome; having a tendency to butt in
Obviate (v.)
to make unnecessary
Occult (n.)
supernatural; magic; mystical
Odious (adj.)
hateful; evil; vile
Odyssey (n.)
a long, difficult journey usually marked by many change of fortune
Olfactory (adj.)
pertaining to the sense of smell
Oligarchy (n.)
government by only a very few people
Ominous (adj.)
threatening; menacing; portending doom
Omniscient (adj.)
all knowing; having infinite wisdom
Opprobrious (adj.)
damning; extremely critical; disgraceful
Ordinance (n.)
regulation; decree; law
Oscillate (v.)
to swing back and forth; to pulsate; to waver or vacillate between belies or ideas
Osmosis (n.)
gradual or subtle absorption
Ostracize (v.)
to shun; to shut out or exclude a person from a group
Oust (v.)
to eject; to expel; to banish
Override (v.)
to overrule; to prevail over
Overture (n.)
opening move; preliminary offer;
Oxymoron (n.)
a figure of speech in which two contradictory words or phrases are used together
Palatable (adj.)
pleasant to the taste; agreeable to the feelings
Pallor (n.)
paleness; whiteness
Pandemic (adj.)
prevalent throughout a large area
Panegyric (n.)
elaborate praise; eulogy
Parable (n.)
religious allegory; fable; morality tale
Paragon (n.)
a model or pattern of excellence
Parallel (adj.)
similar; comparable
Paranoia (n.)
a mental illness in which the sufferer believes people are out to get him
Paranormal (adj.)
having to do with an event or events that can't be explained scientifically
Paroxysm (n.)
a sudden, violent outburst; a severe attack
Partition (n.)
division; dividing wall
Pastoral (adj.)
rural; rustic; peaceful and calm, like the country
Pathos (n.)
that which makes people pity or sorrow
Patina (n.)
surface discoloration caused by age and oxidation
Patrimony (n.)
an inheritance, especially from a father; a legacy
Peculiar (adj.)
unusual; bizarre; individual; belonging to a particular region
Peregrination (n.)
wandering; traveling; expedition
Perpetrator (n.)
the one who committed the act
Perpetuate (v.)
to make something perpetual; to keep from perishing
Perverse (adj.)
contrary; stubborn
Phantasm (n.)
apparition; ghost; phantom
Phlegmatic (adj.)
calm or indifferent; not easily roused to excitement
Pilgrimage (n.)
religious or spiritual journey; excursion
Placebo (n.)
a fake medication; a fake medication
Platonic (adj.)
nonsexual; purely spiritual
Plausible (adj.)
believable; convincing
Pliable (adj.)
flexible; easy to bend; easy to convince, persuade
Plight (n.)
a dangerous, distressing or unpleasant situation
Plunder (v.)
to loot; to ransack
Pluralism (n.)
a condition of society in which distinct groups exist and function together yet retain their own identities
Pontificate (v.)
to speak pompously or dogmatically
Porous (adj.)
filled with many tiny holes; permeable; absorbent
Posterity (n.)
future generations; descendants; heirs
Posthumous (adj.)
occurring after one's death; published after the death of the author
Posture (v.)
to act or speak artificially or affectedly
Prattle (v.)
to chatter on and on; to babble childishly
Precarious (adj.)
dangerously insecure or unsteady
Precocious (adj.)
unusually mature; uncommonly gifte
Predecessor (n.)
someone or something that precedes in time
Predicament (n.)
a dangerous or unpleasant situation; dilemma
Predispose (v.)
to make susceptible; to put in a frame o mind for; to incline toward
Predominant (adj.)
most important; dominant; having power over others
Pregnant (adj.)
highly significant; overflowing
Prelude (n.)
introduction; something that precedes something else
Premeditated (ad.)
planned beforehand; prearranged; plotted
Preponderance (n.)
superiority in weight, number and size,
Presage (v.)
to portend; to foreshadow; to forecast or predict
Presentiment (n.)
the feeling that something (especially something bad) is about to happen
Presumably (adv.)
probably; the assumption is that; doubtless
Presuppose (v.)
to assume beforehand; to take for granted in advance
Primal (adj.)
first; original; of the greatest importance
Pristine (adj.)
perfectly clean and untouched; uncontaminated
Privation (n.)
lack of comforts or necessities; poverty
Proclaim (v.)
to announce; declare; make known
Procure (v.)
to obtain or acquire by special means
Progeny (n.)
offspring; descendants
Propagate (v.)
to reproduce; to multiply; to spread or disseminate
Propound (v.)
to set forth or propose; to offer for consideration
Protege (n.)
a person under the care of someone interested in his welfare or career
Protocol (n.)
diplomatic etiquette and customs
Provocation (n.)
the act of provoking; incitement; cause
Prowess (n.)
exceptional skill or strength; uncommon bravery
Prurient (v.)
having lustful thought or desires; causing lust
Pseudonym (n.)
a false name; an alias
Psyche (n.)
the human soul; the mind; the spirit
Pummel (v.)
to pound or punch with the fists
Punctilious (adj.)
meticulously attentive to detail; scrupulously
Pundit (n.)
an expert; an authority; a learned person
Pungent (adj.)
sharp-tasting or sharp-smelling; acrid; caustic or incisive
Punitive (adj. )
inflicting punishment
Purblind (ad.)
dim-sighted; practically blind; lacking understanding or imagination
Puritanical (adj.)
very severe and strict about morals
Quaint (adj.)
pleasantly old-fashioned; picturesque
Quandary (n.)
state of perplexity; predicament
Quasi (adv/adj)
almost; near; resembling
Quay (n.)
a landing on the edge of the water; wharf; pier
Quell (v.
to put an end to; to squelch; to suppress
Query (n.)
a question; an inquiry
Queue (n.)
a line or file
Quiescent (adj.)
motionless; at rest; still
Quintessential (adj.)
being the most perfect example of
Quizzical (adj.)
teasing; mocking; questioning
Quotidian (adj.)
daily; everyday; ordinary
Rampant (adj.)
widespread; uncontrollable; prevalent; raging
Rapture (n.)
ecstasy; bliss; unequaled joy
Rarefied (adj.)
esoteric; interesting to a select group only
Ratify ( v.)
to confim; to approve something formally
Ratiocination (n.)
logical reasoning
Rationale (n.)
underlying reason; basis; reasoning
Raucous (adj.)
stridently loud; harsh; rowdy
Reactionary (adj.)
ultraconservative; right-wing; backward-thinking
Rebuff (v.)
to snub; to reject
Recidivism (n.)
the act of repeating an offense
Reclaim (v.)
to make uncultivated areas of land fit for cultivation
Redeem (v.)
to buy back; to fulfill; to make up for
Redress (v.)
to remedy; to make amends for
Referendum (n.)
a public vote on measure proposed or passed by a legislature
Refractory (adj.)
disobedient and hard to manage; resisting treatment
Regime (n.)
a governing power
Regimen (n.)
regulated course
Remission (n.)
the temporary or permanent disappearance of a disease
Remuneration (n.)
payment; recompense
Rend (v.)
to tear; to rip