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44 Cards in this Set

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Quotation: "Go, sell what you have, and give it to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.
This quote is made by JESUS in the GOSPEL OF MARK. While setting out on his journey from Judea, a man with material wealth approached Jesus and asked him how one could receive eternal life. In addition to living by the commandments, one must sell all possessions, for the rich man will not to enter the kingdom of god.
Quotation: "Truly I say to you, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see that the Kingdom of God has come with power"
This passage comes from the Gospel Of Mark and is spoken by Jesus. This quote is a warning that the end of the reign of Men is coming to a close, and God will soon come to power. Whoever loses his life for Jesus will save it for the kingdom of God, but if one tries to save his own life, without following God will lose it when God comes to power.
Quotation: "Remember we are women; we are not born to contend with men."
THis is a quote from Ismene, sister to the protagonist Antigone from Sophocles' play ANTIGONE. Sophocles explains how women are inferior to men when it comes to ruling, women should submit to and respect the authority of males. In this quote, Ismene is trying to dissuade Antigone from disobeying a decree from the king that prohibits the burial of Antigone's brother Polynice.
Quotation: As for your wife Sarai, you shall not call her Sarai, but her name shall be Sarah."
This quote is from God to Abraham from the Book Of Genesis. The naming assigment is a sign of the covenant made between God and Abraham. Sarah is to be the mother of a multitude of nations, much like how Abraham is the Father of a multitude of nations.
Quotation: What the good itself is in the intelligible realm, in relation to understanding and intelligible things, the sun is in the visible realm, in relation to understanding and intelligible things.
This quote is made by Socrates and is directed towards Glaucon in the REPUBLIC by PLATO. This relates to the allegory of the cave, Plato uses a dialectic approach to explain that good can only be derived from the sun, and the soul needs the sun to make the good visible and to become truly intelligible.
Quotation: "Remember we are women; we are not born to contend with men."
THis is a quote from Ismene, sister to the protagonist Antigone from Sophocles' play ANTIGONE. Sophocles explains how women are inferior to men when it comes to ruling, women should submit to and respect the authority of males. In this quote, Ismene is trying to dissuade Antigone from disobeying a decree from the king that prohibits the burial of Antigone's brother Polynice.
Quotation: As for your wife Sarai, you shall not call her Sarai, but her name shall be Sarah."
This quote is from God to Abraham from the Book Of Genesis. The naming assigment is a sign of the covenant made between God and Abraham. Sarah is to be the mother of a multitude of nations, much like how Abraham is the Father of a multitude of nations.
Quotation: What the good itself is in the intelligible realm, in relation to understanding and intelligible things, the sun is in the visible realm, in relation to understanding and intelligible things.
This quote is made by Socrates and is directed towards Glaucon in the REPUBLIC by PLATO. This relates to the allegory of the cave, Plato uses a dialectic approach to explain that good can only be derived from the sun, and the soul needs the sun to make the good visible and to become truly intelligible.
Quotation: "Oh Haemon, never lose your sense of judgement over a woman."
This quote is made by Creon to his son Haemon in Sophocles' Antigone. This just displays the misogyny that Creon has against women. It basically expresses how a man should never heed to the actions or persuasion of any woman, regardless of their position. The entire story is dictated by a sense of protofeminism that becomes apparent throughout the story.
Quotation: "I have a divine or spiritual sign which Meletus has riduculed in his deposition."XXX
This quote is made by Socrates to the jury in Plato's The Trial and Death of Socrates. Socrates is plainly saying that he has a divine voice that mandates his action. This is an insult to the accuser/jury member Meletus, who Socrates refutes by saying that his accusations are false.
Quotation: "Nor did I think your edict had such force that you, a mere mortal, could override the gods, the great unwritten, unshakable traditions."
This is from Sophocles' Antigone, where Antigone is speaking to Creon. Antigone is arguing that the decree made by King Creon goes against the timeless laws of the God. Basically, Antigone is accusing Creon of being unlawful and she is the just one in her actions.
Quotation: "What has caused my reputation is none other than a certain kind of wisdom." XXX
This quote is made by Socrates in Plato's The Trial and Death of Socrates. Socrates is defending his wisdom and claims that it has been scrutinized by slanderous comments made by people that do not understand his wisdom.
Quotation: "My god, my god, why hast thou forsaken me?."
This is a quote made by Jesus in the Gospel of Mark shortly before his death on the cross. While this translation could be different from what is actually said in the old scriptures, it seems as if Jesus has a slight moment of self-pity. In all his torment, Jesus might feel abandoned by God, even though he has spent all of his days in reverence of God.
Quotation: "You must not, however, eat flesh with its life-blood in it."
This is a reckoning from God towards Noah and his sons from the book of Genesis. God gives Noah permission to eat any animal as long as it is not alive, this is to avoid the consumption of life-giving blood. This quote extends to man the rule over the animal kingdom, deeming it acceptable to eat meat at their discretion.
Quotation: " Let the golden bough show itself now on a tree in the forest, since the prophetess was all too right about you, Misenus."
This quote is made by Aeneas as a prayer towards the Goddess and Mother in Virgil's Aeneid. The Golden Bough is similar to a fare for the passage over the waters to the Stygian groves, the realm of the dead. Aeneas thinks that the bough should be granted to him since he have Misenus a dirge and made a tomb and altar, Misenus is the companion and horn blower for Hector, this act gives insight into Roman burial customs.
Quotation: "Let the children first be fed, for it is not right to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs."XXX
This quote is from Jesus and is directed as a Greek Syrophoenician woman from the GOSPEL OF MARK. At this point, Jesus and his disciples were going to feast, as these were his children, and the women's child is the metaphorical dog, and feeding the dog would be wastefulness.
Quotation: "Do members of the assembly corrupt the young, or do they all improve them?"
This questions is from Socrates towards Meletus, a judge in The Trial and Death of Socrates by Plato. Socrates is trying to refute Meletus and prove that he is not the sole corruptor of the youth. Socrates is trying to prove that if he is the corruptor, it is unintentional and he is being dealt with incorrectly.
Quotation: "For dust you are, and dust you shall return."
THis quote is made by God towards Adam and Eve in the Book of Genesis. God is punishing Adam and Eve for eating an apple from the forbidden tree, he has put a time limit on their life for now they shall die and return to dust, denied everlasting life. This quote points out the that man is not perfect and they are plagued with a short and difficult life on this earth.
Quotation: "Oh, Dido, so the message was true...you took your one life with steel."
This was Aeneas speaking to Dido in the Fields of Lamentation in the underworld in Virgil's Aeneid. Aeneas felt sorrow for leaving Dido and being the cause of her death. Seeing Dido is confirmation to Aeneas that she actually took her life. Aeneas is genuinely sorry for the outcome but ultimately tries to justify his actions, claiming that his departure was god-mandated.
Quotation: "DO you think you can get away from me while wearing the spoils of one of my men? Pallas sacrifices you with this stroke."
THis quote is from Aeneas towards Turnus in Virgil's Aeneid. This is the dramatic end to the defeat of the Rutuli, Turnus was the chief antagonist of the hero. At this point Turnus has lost and asks for mercy, but seeing the trophy belt of his companion Aeneas is enraged and charges Turnus with the kill.
..."the god who made you mixed some gold into those who are adequately equipped to rule... he put silver into those who are auxiliaries and iron and bronze in the farmers and other craftsmen."
This is a quote from Plato in REPUBLIC. Plato uses a noble falsehood known as the myth of the metals to construct the ideal ruler. This is a parable, claiming There are natural rulers of the others because they are perfect, because their telos of nature is perfectly realized in them.
AENEAS
This is the epic hero from Virgil's Aeneid. Aeneas is a mythological hero, who had superhuman qualities considering his mother is the goddess Aphrodite. Aeneas is destined to establish and become king of Rome(well the precursor of what is Rome) but must first go through many trials, with godly intervention, to fulfill his destiny.
Allegory of the cave
The allegory of the cave uses a brilliant metaphor of the sun and how it's analogous to the divided line. This story points out how the good is the last thing to be seen and is reached only with difficulty. Whoever sees the light has entered the visible realm which controls the intelligible realm and provides truth and understanding.
Arete
Arete is used by can be related to goodness, excellence, or virtue in Greek. This word has is related to anything virtuous and responsible for good-making characteristics. It is bound of with the notion of living up to one's full potential.
Democracy
Democracy is discussed in Great detail by Aristotle in POLITICS, hence the name. Though Aristotle described several different and situational kinds of democracy, it can be simplistically depicted as a deficient system where the poor are in power.
Relativism
Is touched upon by sophist philosophers and Plato to name a few. Using the idea of relativism; the way something appears and exists to one person, could appear and exist to someone else differently, but each person believes their way to be the truth. So there is no separate or objective truth apart from how each individual happens to see things. This makes it impossible for absolute truths to exist.
epistemology
This term is relevant to the writings of Plato and can be witnessed in his book REPUBLIC. Epistemology studies the nature of human knowledge and it's validity.
epistemology. XXX
This term is relevant to the writings of Plato and can be witnessed in his book REPUBLIC. Epistemology studies the nature of human knowledge and it's validity.
Gadfly
The Gadfly is a parable used by Plato in the Trial and Death of Socrates. Socrates relates his role in society as a Gadfly on a slow and moronic horse(the current political system). Though small in comparison to the horse, the Gadfly's purpose is important to irritate and subsequently motivate society to an improved state.
Lyceum
This is popular philosophical school that was founded by Aristotle. the school was built on the site of the Temple of Apollo of Lyceus.
metaphysics
This term is relevant to the readings from Plato and Aristotle and Seneca. It is the branch of philosophy that treats of first principles, includes ontology and cosmology, and is intimately connected with epistemology.
Myth of the metals
This is a "noble lie" that is explained in Plato's republic. This falsehood would be used to persuade the rulers or at least the others in the city. THis myth argues that everyone is born with an intrinsic metal instilled in them, whether it be gold, silver, bronze, or a mixture that predetermines their most useful purpose in life.
Monarchy
A monarchy is described in detail in Aristotle's POLITICS. Monarchy was a badly devised constitution where there is rule by one. This is one of his theoretical classification where he gives many examples of what constitutes a monarchy.
Monarchy
A monarchy is described in detail in Aristotle's POLITICS. Monarchy was a badly devised constitution where there is rule by one. This is one of his theoretical classifications where he gives many examples of what constitutes a monarchy.
monotheism
Signs of Monotheism can be seen throughout the evolution religion and is the belief in only one God. The earliest signs of Monotheism was briefly adopted in Egyptian society with their omnipotent God Aten. Later the Tanakh describes a movement from henotheism to monotheism. Crhristians also believe in only one god.
Oligarchy
An oligarchy is explained by Aristotle in detail. Aristotle refers to a government controlled by a minority consisting of the wealthy. Unlike aristocracy, Aristotle believes, oligarchy is a bad form of government, as the ruling faction governs solely in its own interests, disregarding those of the poor.
Tanakh
Tanakh is the name for the sacred scriptures of the Jewish religion, it is a collection of books from different time periods. In Christianity, the Tanakh is referred to as the Old testament.
Tetragrammaton
This is the collective label for the four Hebrew letters that are transliterated YHWH, which considered a personal form when referring to God.
Theory of Forms
Plato proposed the theory of forms in REPUBLIC. A form is a perfect, eternal, unchanging, transcendent essence of the item in question; a universal concept under which all of its specific instantiations fall; an ideal standard by which all particular examples are judged.
Stoics
Founded by Zeno, and practiced by the famous philosopher Seneca. Stoics have a strong sense of civil duty. The three key precepts or ideas of stoicism are 1) materialims: everything in the niverse has some kind of bodily substance; 2) monism: everything is the manifestation of one ultimate reality; and 3) mutation: everything in perpetually changing. Determinism, reason, natural law, equality, cosmopolitinism, apatheia.
Epicureans
Epicureanism was prevalent around the same time as stoicism. The main ideas were: atomism: everything is composed of tiny indivisible particles called atoms. 2) Egoistic hedonism: the highest good is the individual pleasure or happiness.
Rationalism
The idea of rationalism was a conception of knowledge from Plato. Rationalism stresses that our knowledge of reality originates in and is justified by reason; the intellect. Apriori knowledge, innate ideas, certainty as the ideal, top-down approach, deduction, and dislikes natural science and most art.
Empiricism
Empiricism was adopted by Aristotle and is covered in POLITICS. It is a theory of knowledge, our knowledge of reality originates in and is justified by sensory experience. Aposteriori, mind as "blank slate", probablility as the ideal, bottom-up approach, induction, Loved natural science.
Teleology
Aristotle based everything on teleology, and it relates to goal-directedness. His idea of teleology informs every area of his intellectual activity, from science and metaphysics to ethics and politics. i.e. Teleology in relation to the state: The state and the individual each pursues its "good", but the individual's good can only be pursued within the context of the good of the state.