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13 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Types of IV Devices
Peripheral IV Catheter
Central Venous Catheter
Arterial Line
Chemotherapy ports
Peripheral IV Catheter
Deliver Medications, fluid therapy, nutrition.
Frequent blood sampling.
This is the only type of IV a nuclear medicine tech can start
Central Venous Catheter
A sterile tube inserted into the central circulation
- Allows monitoring of CV pressure
- Frequent blood sampling
- Administration of fluids
- Used when access of peripheral vein is difficult
- Used for prolonged IV therapy
- Insertion Point: subclavian or jugular vein
End point: Superior vena cava or right atrium
Types of Central Venous Catheters
- Single lumen and multi lumen catheters
- Groshong catheter
- Hckman catheter
- Broviac catheter
- Hickman/Broviac catheter
-Peripherally inserted central Catheter (PICC)
Arterial "A" Line
Catheter inserted into an artery
Allows real time blood pressure measurement
Allows constant monitoring of arterial blood gases
Common insertion sites: wrist (radial artery) elbow ( brachial artery) groin (femoral artery) neck ( carotid artery)
- Not commonly used for fluid therapy.
Chemotherapy Ports
A device implanted under the skin, usually the chest.
-Consists of a catheter connected into a central vein, plus a silicone bubble for administrating medications.
- Portacath, Mediport
- Generic Name: totally implantable venous access device (TIVAS)
- A version of central venous device
- May one be accessed by a nurse.
Types of Central Venous Catheters
- Single lumen and multi lumen catheters
- Groshong catheter
- Hickman catheter
- Broviac catheter
Hickman/Broviac catheter
Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) = usually a Ray vein
Arterial "A" Line
Catheter inserted into an artery
- Allows real time blood pressure
- Allows constant monitoring of arterial blood gases
- Common insertion sites wrist ( radial artery) elbow ( brachial artery) groin ( femoral artery) neck ( carotid artery)
Not used for fluid therapy
You will not inject into a A line
Chemotherapy Ports
A device implanted under the skin, usually in the chest.
- Consists of a catheter connected into a central vein, plus a silicone bubble for administering medications
- Common names: Portacath, Mediport
Generic Name: totally implantable venous access device (TIVAS)
- A version of central venous device
- May only be accessed by a nurse.
- If line is accessed, you may inject radioisotope, only if line is accessed.
Starting an IV
Same venipuncture technique used for injection, then:
-Once flashback occurs, untie tourniquet.
- Anchor vein with non-dominant hand and push catheter forward into vein with dominant hand.
- Have connections device ready
- Remove needle and connect device to catheter
Complication in IV devices
Infection
- Use aseptic technique whenever you touch an IV
- Gloves on!
- Wipe end of the adaptor with alcohol to air dry.
Thrombosis
Clot
Flush with saline, check before injecting
Leakage
Only in peripheral IV's check all connectors before injecting radiopharmaceutical
Complications in IV devices
Extravasation or infiltration
- IV fluid enters tissue instead of vein
- Redness, swelling, irritation in area around vein
- Wheal or raised area when IV is flushed
- Patient complains of burning sensation when IV is flushed
-** Do not use this IV