Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/5

Click to flip

5 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
New Supreme Court term starts with rejections

By Bill Mears
CNN
Thursday, October 9, 2003 Posted: 10:57 PM EDT (0257 GMT)
WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Supreme Court on Monday officially began its fall term, rejecting without comment many of the pending appeals before the court.

The brief session was largely ceremonial, with a third of the justices missing from the bench. Court arguments were canceled because of the Yom Kippur holiday. Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer, who are Jewish, were not present, and court officials said Justice Anthony Kennedy was traveling.
Alabama chief justice: 'Judges can't make the law'

Tuesday, September 2, 2003 Posted: 10:55 PM EDT (0255 GMT)
(CNN) -- Suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore plans to file an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court next month.

Moore was suspended for refusing to obey a federal judge's order to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building.
Published Thursday
December 9, 2004

White House Defends Commandments Displays



By GINA HOLLAND

Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Bush administration on Wednesday urged the Supreme Court to allow Ten Commandments displays on government property, adding a federal view on a major church-state case that justices will deal with early next year.

The government has weighed in before in religion cases at the high court, including one earlier this year that challenged the words ''under God'' in the classroom recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance.

The government supported a California school district in that case. Now, it is backing two Kentucky counties that had framed copies of the Ten Commandments in their courthouses.

The American Civil Liberties Union sued McCreary and Pulaski counties, claiming the displays were an unconstitutional promotion of religion. The group won.
Published Thursday
December 9, 2004

Administration asks court to allow Commandments displays
WASHINGTON (AP) - The Bush administration on Wednesday urged the U.S. Supreme Court to allow Ten Commandments displays on government property, adding a federal view on a major church-state case that the justices will deal with early next year.

The government is backing two Kentucky counties that had framed copies of the Ten Commandments in their courthouses. The American Civil Liberties Union sued McCreary and Pulaski Counties, claiming that the displays were an unconstitutional promotion of religion. The group won, and the counties appealed.
Published Thursday
December 2, 2004

Burlington Eagles to save monument
BURLINGTON, Iowa (AP) - Members of an Eagles club plan to move granite tablets engraved with the Ten Commandments from a train depot to their meeting place.

Local Aerie 150 Fraternal Order of Eagles' trustees Larry Bauer, Mike Albaugh and Fire Chief Tom Clements told the City Council this week that they are concerned about the fate of the large monument.

"Today, court cases are seen popping up claiming such religious relics have no place on public ground," the trustees wrote in a letter to Mayor Mike Edwards. "The courts have ordered many of these tablets removed, and those who feel that they should be removed have vandalized many other tablets."