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61 Cards in this Set

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Alliteration
The purposeful repetition of initial consonant sounds. (e.g. "Let us go forth to lead the land we love." J.F. Kennedy, Inaugural; "Veni, vidi, vici." Julius Caesar)
Allusion
A reference to a well known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art. (Allusions sometimes refer to Biblical or mythological people, places, etc.)
Ambivalent
simultaneous and contradictory attitudes or feelings (as attraction and repulsion) toward an object, person, or action
Anecdote
A short, often autobiographical, narrative told to achieve a purpose such as to provide an example, an illustration, or a thematic truth.
Aphorism
A statement of some general principle, expressed memorably by condensing much wisdom into few words. ("Without pain there is no gain" Benjamin Franklin)
Aside
Away from one's thought or consideration, away from others or into privacy
Chiasmus
Parralle structure in inverted/mirror form -- Two corresponding pairs arranged not in parallels (a-b-a-b) but in inverted order (a-b-b-a).
Colloquial/Colloquialism
An expression used in informal conversation but not accepted universally in formal speech or writing. A colloquialism lies between the upper level of dignified, formal, academic, or "literary" language, and the lower level of slang.
Conceit
An elaborate, complex metaphor or simile comparing two extremely dissimilar things
Cursory
Rapidly and often superficially performed. Hastily.
Cynical
1. Believing or showing the belief that people are motivated chiefly by base or selfish concerns; skeptical of the motives of others. 2. Selfishly or callously calculating . 3. Negative or pessimistic, as from world-weariness . 4. Expressing jaded or scornful skepticism or negativity
Decorous
characterized by propriety and dignity and good taste in manners and conduct; "the tete-a-tete was decorous in the extreme"
Delusion
psychology) an erroneous belief that is held in the face of evidence to the contrary
a mistaken or unfounded opinion or idea; "he has delusions of competence"; "his dreams of vast wealth are a hallucination"
the act of deluding; deception by creating illusory ideas
Derision/Derisive
contemptuous laughter
the act of deriding or treating with contempt
Diction
Word choice. To discuss a writer's diction is to consider the vocabulary used, appropriateness of the words, and the vividness of the language.
Didactic
instructive (especially excessively)
Digression
a message that departs from the main subject
diversion: a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern); "a diversion from the main highway"; "a digression into irrelevant details"; "a deflection from his goal"
wandering from the main path of a journey
Disparagingly
derogative: expressive of low opinion; "derogatory comments"; "disparaging remarks about the new house"
Duplicitous
ambidextrous: marked by deliberate deceptiveness especially by pretending one set of feelings and acting under the influence of another; "she was a deceitful scheming little thing"- Israel Zangwill; "a double-dealing double agent"; "a double-faced infernal traitor and schemer"- W.M.Thackeray
Epiphany
"Epiphany in fiction, when a character suddenly experiences a deep realization about himself or herself; a truth which is grasped in an ordinary rather than a melodramatic moment." (Meyer).
Euphemism
A device where being indirect replaces directness to avoid embarrassment or unpleasantness
Exorbitant
greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation; "exorbitant rent"; "extortionate prices"; "spends an outrageous amount on entertainment"; "usurious interest rate"; "unconscionable spending"
Foreshadowing
The use in a literary work of clues that suggest events that have yet to occur
Hyperbole
A deliberate exaggeration or overstatement
Incredulous
not disposed or willing to believe; unbelieving
Indignant
angered at something unjust or wrong; "an indignant denial"; "incensed at the judges' unfairness"; "a look of outraged disbelief"; "umbrageous at the loss of their territory"
Irony
The name given to literary techniques that involve differences between appearance and reality, expectation and result, or meaning and intention.
Jocular
In a joking manner
Judicious
marked by the exercise of good judgment or common sense in practical matters; "judicious use of one's money"; "a wise decision"
Lacerating
Cutting
Litotes
A form of understatment in which a thing is affirmed by stating the negative of it's opposite (e.g. "Not bad")
Magnanimous
greathearted: noble and generous in spirit; "a greathearted general"; "a magnanimous conqueror"
big: generous and understanding and tolerant; "a heart big enough to hold no grudges"; "that's very big of you to be so forgiving"; "a large and generous spirit"; "a large heart"; "magnanimous toward his enemies"
Metaphor
A figure of speech in which one thing is spoken of as though it were something else.
Metonymy
A figure of speech in which the name of one object is substituted for something closely related to it
Mien
a person's manner or appearance, as in: She was a woman of dignified mien.
Nonplussed
at a loss(p): filled with bewilderment; "at a loss to understand those remarks"; "puzzled that she left without saying goodbye"
Ostentatious
intended to attract notice and impress others; "an ostentatious sable coat"
of a display that is tawdry or vulgar
Oxymoron
A two-word figure of speech that combines two opposing or contradictory ideas
Parable
fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)
Paradox
An assertion seeminly opposed to common sense, but that may yet have some truth in it.
Parallelism
The repetition of a grammatical structure
Pathetic fallacy
The excessive attritution of human feelings to nature. Usually the pathetic fallacy gives a sense of overdone emotionalism.
Patronizing
arch: (used of behavior or attitude) characteristic of those who treat others with condescension
Pedestrian
Ordinary
Personification
A type of figurative language in which a nonhuman subject is given human characteristics
Platitude
a trite or obvious remark
Polysyndeton
The repetition of conjuctions in a series of coordinate words, phrases or clauses.
Posturing
Posing
Pragmatic
matter-of-fact: concerned with practical matters; "a matter-of-fact (or pragmatic) approach to the problem"; "a matter-of-fact account of the trip"
Pretentious
making claim to or creating an appearance of (often undeserved) importance or distinction; "a pretentious country house"; "a pretentious fraud"; "a pretentious scholarly edition"
Proprietary
proprietorship: an unincorporated business owned by a single person who is responsible for its liabilities and entitled to its profits
Rhetorical question
A question used for persuasion, to which the answer is obvious and usually only one answer is possible. A rhetorical question is not intended to induce a reply
Sardonic
Scornfully or cynically mocking
Sensory details
Appeals to more than one of the senses
Simile
A figure of speech in which like, as, or than is used to make a comparison between two basically unlike subjects.
Syllogism
A form of deductive reasoning consisting of a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion
Symbol
An object that has its own meaning, but also represents an abstract idea.
Synecdoche
A form of metaphor in which a part of something isused to stand for the whole thing.
Understatement
Saying less than is actually meant, generally in an ironic way.
Wistful
pensive: showing pensive sadness; "the sensitive and wistful response of a poet to the gentler phases of beauty"
Wry
dry: humorously sarcastic or mocking; "dry humor"; "an ironic remark often conveys an intended meaning obliquely"; "an ironic novel"; "an ironical smile"; "with a wry Scottish wit"
bent to one side; "a wry neck"