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14 Cards in this Set

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L 1211 DETERMINING MANNER OF RESPONSE:
1. NORMAL RESPONSE -- ANY CALL OR ASSIGNMENT WHICH IS NOT AN
EMERGENCY.

- EMERGENCY RESPONSE -- ANY CALL OR ASSIGNMENT WHICH IS AN
EMERGENCY AND REQUIRES A FASTER POLICE RESPONSE THAN
WOULD OCCUR IF TRAFFIC LAWS WERE STRICTLY OBEYED.
L 2102 INITIATING, CONTINUANCE AND TERMINATION OF PURSUITS:
When the violator does not stop, or attempts to avoid capture, a pursuit is
initiated.
a non-violent felon,
misdemeanant, person suspected of a property crime, or vehicle code violator,
should terminate the pursuit when it becomes apparent the violator exhibits the
intent to evade, willfully flees or otherwise attempts to elude the pursuing
officer(s) by driving without due care for the safety of others.
with a violent felon who poses a
significant, on-going threat to public safety, may continue the pursuit unless the
specific facts and circumstances change to the point that the danger or serious
injury posed by the vehicle pursuit to other motorists and pedestrians outweighs
the need to apprehend the violator.
The seriousness of the offense and the threat posed by the fleeing suspect(s
-Speeds Involved, Pedestrian and Vehicular Traffic
-Road Conditions, Weather, and /or Visibility
-Capability of Police Vehicle, Including Radio Communications
-Ability to Identify the Suspect(s) Suspect(s) and Likelihood of Subsequent
Apprehension
L 2103 NUMBER OF UNITS INVOLVED:
The units involved in a pursuit should ordinarily be limited to a primary and
secondary unit. The primary pursuing unit is the vehicle closest to the suspect
vehicle. The secondary pursuing unit is to serve as a backup in case trouble
develops with the primary unit and to assist in the apprehension at the
termination of the pursuit. The secondary unit should perform the
communications function when requested to do so by the primary unit. A
supervisor may also be involved in a pursuit with the two pursuing units, as per
Duty Manual Section L 2106.
An officer in the primary unit or a supervisor may request additional units to be
involved in a pursuit if it appears the officers in the vehicles involved would not be
sufficient to safely effect the ultimate arrest of the suspect(s). Variables of each
pursuit, such as the nature of the crime, number of suspects, need for canines, or
other articulable facts to warrant additional units, will dictate the number of units
involved.
L 1306 NUMBER OF UNITS TO RESPOND/BASIC RESPONSE TEAM:
The Department member initiating the call for assistance is usually the best judge
of what resources are required to control the situation. Communications
personnel will abide by the field unit's request. When a Department member does
not specify the number of units needed, or there is insufficient information
supplied or available, or a citizen initiates the call in place of a member, a "Basic
Response Team" will be dispatched. A "Basic Response Team" consists of the
following units:
- Two units responding to the scene using an "emergency response."
- Two units responding to the scene using a "normal response."
- One supervisor responding to the scene using a "normal response."
Other units will not move into the area unless assigned by Communications
personnel or Field Supervisors
L 2006 "CODE 3" ESCORTS:
Vehicle Code Section 21057 prohibits officers from escorting under "Code 3"
conditions except when performing the following:
- Escorting for the purpose of preserving life.
- Expediting the movement of supplies or personnel during a national, state or
local emergency.
When escorting for the purpose of preserving life, officers will consider the nature
of the emergency, the dangers and hazards involved, and the emotional
condition of the person to be escorted before deciding to escort "Code 3."
L 1603 NO ATTEMPTED ENTRY - FALSE ALARM:
Officers will check the premises of the alarm. If there is no evidence of entry or
attempted entry, or if the alarm is otherwise determined to be false, the officer
assigned the call will complete a "False Alarm Incident Report" (Form 200-29).
The officer will leave the duplicate of the report at the premises or with the
responsible, if present. The officer will turn in the original to a box provided in the
report writing room prior to the end of shift.
After completing the "False Alarm Incident Report" at the scene, the officers will
return to "in-service" status. The officers will not wait for the alarm company or
the responsible party to respond to the scene. However, if police assistance to
enter and check the premises is requested by the responsible party, officers will
respond and assist consistent with existing resources and demands for service.
L 1604 AUDIBLE ALARMS:
If the alarm is an audible alarm, the name and address of the alarm and the
location and the name of the alarm company, will be given to Communications by
a responding officer. Communications will notify the responsible alarm company.
L 1605 DISPOSITION CODE:
When returning to "in-service" status from an alarm response, officers will use
one of the following codes:
- If the alarm is false, officers will use the disposition "U." Officers will complete a
"False Alarm Incident Report."
- If the alarm was caused by a crime, or an actual or attempted entry, the officers
will use the disposition "R" and will complete a "Crime Report" (Form 200-2).
- Officers will update the event with Communications to reflect the type of report
taken (i.e. "update to 459, 1098 R").
- If an officer is assigned to an audible alarm but is unable to locate the source of
the alarm, the officer will use the disposition "G."
- If an officer responds to a previously reported alarm, the officer will use the
disposition "P."
Laned Roadways
21658 C.V.C.
Whenever any roadway has been divided into two or more clearly marked lanes for traffic in one direction, the following rules apply:
(a) A vehicle shall be driven as nearly as practical entirely within a single lane and shall not be moved from the lane until such movement can be made with reasonable safety.
Designated Traffic Direction
21657 C.V.C.
The authorities in charge of any highway may designate any highway, roadway, part of a roadway, or specific lanes upon which vehicular traffic shall proceed in one direction at all or such times as shall be indicated by official traffic control devices. When a roadway has been so designated, a vehicle shall be driven only in the direction designated at all or such times as shall be indicated by traffic control devices.
PC
415
Any of the following persons shall be punished by imprisonment in the county jail for a period of not more than 90 days, a fine of not more than four hundred dollars ($400), or both such imprisonment and fine: (1) Any person who unlawfully fights in a public place or challenges another person in a public place to fight. (2) Any person who maliciously and willfully disturbs another person by loud and unreasonable noise. (3) Any person who uses offensive words in a public place which are inherently likely to provoke an immediate violent reaction
L 4605 RESPONSIBILITY FOR PROCEDURE:
Due to the complex nature of the formal identification process, officers intending
to conduct formal identification processes will do so through the investigative unit
assigned to the case. When no investigative unit has been assigned, the initiating
officer will contact the commanding officer of the Detective Division to arrange for
the procedure. The Formal Identification process will follow the Line-up protocol
outlined in L 4603.
- RECORDING CIRCUMSTANCES: The officer will record the following
circumstances when conducting a Formal Identification:
• Record the admonition given to the witness(es).
• Duration.
• Persons present.
• Distance from which the identification was made.
• Statements of witnesses attempting the identification.
• Photograph or describe the physical appearance of the person being
identified.
• Other circumstances which may assist in determining the validity of the
identification.
• A Supplementary Offense Report (Form 200-3) will be used to document the
process.
L 2102 INITIATING, CONTINUANCE AND TERMINATION OF PURSUITS:
Vehicle pursuits are one of the most dangerous enforcement actions in which a
police officer may be engaged. A police officer must consider that his or her split
second decision to initiate a vehicle pursuit may result in serious consequences.
This policy provides specific guidelines and criteria to assist an officer in
determining when the seriousness of an offense justifies the initiation,
continuation, or termination of a vehicle pursuit.
Vehicle pursuits originate from a variety of often-unpredictable circumstances,
including traffic stops, surveillances, in-progress crimes, etc. When an officer
attempt to conduct a car stop, and the violator fails to immediately yield, there is
a brief interval where the officer follows the violator with lights and siren activated
in an effort to lawfully stop them. It is during this time that officers shall gather as
much identifying information as possible about the vehicle and occupant(s)
should later investigation be needed, and evaluate the violators behavior to
determine their intent to yield or to evade.
When the violator does not stop, or attempts to avoid capture, a pursuit is
initiated.
When the violator does not stop, and the driving behavior is reasonably
perceived as being non-hazardous, (i.e., the violator is mindful of other persons'
safety, the vehicle code, and is traveling at reasonable speeds for the conditions
of the traffic and roadway), the officer can continue to pursue the vehicle, unless
the driving behavior or circumstances change that would make it unsafe to
continue.
Personnel who are involved in a vehicle pursuit with a non-violent felon,
misdemeanant, person suspected of a property crime, or vehicle code violator,
should terminate the pursuit when it becomes apparent the violator exhibits the
intent to evade, willfully flees or otherwise attempts to elude the pursuing
officer(s) by driving without due care for the safety of others.
Personnel who are involved in a vehicle pursuit with a violent felon who poses a
significant, on-going threat to public safety, may continue the pursuit unless the
specific facts and circumstances change to the point that the danger or serious
injury posed by the vehicle pursuit to other motorists and pedestrians outweighs
the need to apprehend the violator.
The seriousness of the offense and the threat posed by the fleeing suspect(s)
must justify the vehicle pursuit. When initiating or continuing a vehicle pursuit,
officers should continually weigh the seriousness of the offense(s) against the
potential dangers to themselves and members of the community.
Proximity to Vehicle
Officers intending to stop a vehicle should be within close proximity to the
violators' vehicle before activating the emergency equipment. Depending upon
the circumstances, officers should evaluate if the distance between the pursuing
and fleeing vehicles is so great that initiating or continuing a pursuit would be
impractical.
Speeds Involved, Pedestrian and Vehicular Traffic
The speeds of vehicles involved in a pursuit should not create an unreasonable
risk of accident or injury to pedestrian and other vehicular traffic. In determining
the risks, Department members should consider whether the speeds of the
vehicles disproportionately exceeds the speeds of other traffic, or may require
pedestrian or vehicular traffic to perform abrupt evasive maneuvering.
Road Conditions, Weather, and /or Visibility
The road conditions should not create unreasonable risks of accident or injury.
When determining risks, adverse weather, time of day, traffic congestion, and
overall visibility should be considered.
Capability of Police Vehicle, Including Radio Communications
Officers should consider the capabilities of the police vehicles involved and the
quality of radio communications between the pursuing unit(s), the dispatcher, and
the field supervisor.
Ability to Identify the Suspect(s) Suspect(s) and Likelihood of Subsequent
Apprehension
When pursuing known suspects, Department members should consider the
option of delaying immediate apprehension. A pursuit may not be necessary if a
known suspect can be apprehended later, and there is no compelling public
safety need for an immediate arrest. Also, a pursuit may not be necessary if
there is an aircraft available to observe the fleeing vehicle.
Familiarity With Area
Department members should consider their knowledge of the area in which the
pursuit takes place, as well as the particular characteristics of the area (such as
schools, parks, residential and business areas).
Continuation of Pursuit
The primary pursuit unit may continue a pursuit if it is reasonable to do so under
these guidelines, or unless directed to terminate the pursuit by a supervisor or
other proper authority. When directed to terminate a pursuit, the pursuing
officer(s) shall do so immediately and acknowledge the directive on the radio.
L 1211 DETERMINING MANNER OF RESPONSE:
Only two types of response are allowed. To assist Department members in
determining the appropriate response, the following guidelines are provided:
- NORMAL RESPONSE -- ANY CALL OR ASSIGNMENT WHICH IS NOT AN
EMERGENCY.
Officers will respond to the call immediately unless there is a need/reason to
delay response. Communications will be advised of any delays. Department
members will obey all traffic laws and consider road and traffic conditions when
making a "normal response." Red lights and/or siren are not authorized.
- EMERGENCY RESPONSE -- ANY CALL OR ASSIGNMENT WHICH IS AN
EMERGENCY AND REQUIRES A FASTER POLICE RESPONSE THAN
WOULD OCCUR IF TRAFFIC LAWS WERE STRICTLY OBEYED.
Red lights and siren will be used.
An "emergency response" does not relieve the driver of a vehicle from the duty to
drive with due regard for the safety of all persons using the highway nor protect
the driver from the consequences of an arbitrary exercise of an "emergency
response."