Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/53

Click to flip

53 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What is INTOXICATION?
A reversible nondependent experience with a substance that produces impairment.
What is Psychological dependence?
Habituation - the continuous or intermittent craving for a substance to avoid a dysphoric state.
When trying to diagnose a substance disorder, what must you differentiate?
Whether it's Abuse or Dependence
What are the 4 criteria for Substance Abuse? (have to have at least 3 in 12 month period)
1. Recurrent use results in failure to fulfill obligations
2. Use is in physically hazardous situations
3. Recurrent legal problems related to substance use
4. Continues despite problems
What are the 7 criteria for Substance DEPENDENCE? (have to have at least 3 in 12 months)
1. Tolerance (need more & more)
2. Withdrawal
3. Use more to avoid withdrawal
4. Desire/fail to cut down use
5. Spend much time doing it
6. Gave up important activities due to using
7. Continue despite problems
If you do diagnose some one as Substance Dependent, what must be specified?
Whether it's with physiological dependence (tolerance/withdrawal) or without.
What is Substance withdrawal defined as?
The development of substance-specific symptoms due to stopping use that has been long and heavy
When can Remission specifiers be used in diagnosing a patient?
When the substance has not been used and no criteria for abuse or dependence have been met for at least one month.
Can you say a person is in remission if they are in a controlled environment or on an agonist?
no
What is Early full remission?
No criteria have been met for at least a month, but not a full year yet.
What is Early partial remission?
One or more, but not 3 criteria have been met in over a month but not a year.
What is Sustained partial remission?
Having met a couple criteria, but not 3, for a year or more
What is Sustained full remission?
Not having met any criteria for over a year
What % of the US population has a substance related disorder?
10%
What personality disorder may precede alcohol dependence in men?
Antisocial personality disorder
What is INTOXICATION?
A reversible nondependent experience with a substance that produces impairment.
What is Psychological dependence?
Habituation - the continuous or intermittent craving for a substance to avoid a dysphoric state.
When trying to diagnose a substance disorder, what must you differentiate?
Whether it's Abuse or Dependence
What are the 4 criteria for Substance Abuse? (have to have at least 3 in 12 month period)
1. Recurrent use results in failure to fulfill obligations
2. Use is in physically hazardous situations
3. Recurrent legal problems related to substance use
4. Continues despite problems
What are the 7 criteria for Substance DEPENDENCE? (have to have at least 3 in 12 months)
1. Tolerance (need more & more)
2. Withdrawal
3. Use more to avoid withdrawal
4. Desire/fail to cut down use
5. Spend much time doing it
6. Gave up important activities due to using
7. Continue despite problems
If you do diagnose some one as Substance Dependent, what must be specified?
Whether it's with physiological dependence (tolerance/withdrawal) or without.
What is Substance withdrawal defined as?
The development of substance-specific symptoms due to stopping use that has been long and heavy
When can Remission specifiers be used in diagnosing a patient?
When the substance has not been used and no criteria for abuse or dependence have been met for at least one month.
Can you say a person is in remission if they are in a controlled environment or on an agonist?
no
What is Early full remission?
No criteria have been met for at least a month, but not a full year yet.
What is Early partial remission?
One or more, but not 3 criteria have been met in over a month but not a year.
What is Sustained partial remission?
Having met a couple criteria, but not 3, for a year or more
What is Sustained full remission?
Not having met any criteria for over a year
What % of the US population has a substance related disorder?
10%
What personality disorder may precede alcohol dependence in men?
Antisocial personality disorder
What mood disorders make women more prone to alcoholism?
-Major depressive disorder
-Bipolar I disorder
Why do folks with bipolar use alcohol?
To self medicate manic episodes
What % of alcoholics commit suicide?
10-15%
What are 2 lab tests specific for alcoholism?
-MCV (high)
-GGT
What is the behavioral effect of alcohol?
Depressant
What drugs cross react with alcohol and are used in treating withdrawal?
Benzodiazepines
What are some commonly used benzodiazepines to treat alcoholism?
-Librium
-Diazepam (valium)
-Lorazepam
-Tegretol (carbamezapine)
What are the classic signs of alcohol withdrawal?
-Tremor
-Seizures
-Autonomic hyperactivity
-Hypertension
What is the worst form of alcohol withdrawal?
Withdrawal delirium
Why is withdrawal delirium so bad?
It can result in death
What is important to remember about the dietary requirement of alcoholics?
They need vitamin B12
What % of the US population has used alcohol at least once?
What % of men are alcoholics?
What % of women are alcoholics?
90% tried it once
10% men
3-5% women
What nationality has highest % of drinkers? Highest abstention rate?
Highest drinkers are jews, but they're lowest dependents
Highest abstainers are irish, but they have severe EtOH problems
What is a normal low dose level of blood alcohol?
20-30 mg/dl
What is a high dose of alcohol at which nystgmus and blackouts occur?
200-300 mg/dl
What happens at blood alcohol levels above 300 mg/dL?
Impaired vital signs and possible death.
What enzyme converts alcohol in the liver to acetaldehyde?
Alcohol dehydrogenase
Does alcohol help sleeping?
no it decreases REM stage 4 sleep
What causes peripheral neuropathy in alcoholics?
Vitamin deficits and direct effects of the alcohol
What happens to the brain in alcoholism?
The cerebellum degenerates
In what four personality disorders are alcoholism overrepresented?
1. Antisocial personality disorder
2. Schizophrenia
3. Bipolar disorder
4. Anxiety disorders
If a person dies due to alcoholism what is the average age of death?
60
Once a person meets criteria for alcohol dependence what are the chances of being able to drink under control?
Very low