Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/19

Click to flip

19 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Robin Pomeroy. “Pope Benedict vows new battle for souls.” Yahoo!News 25 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=564&ncid=2357&e=2&u=/nm/20050425/ts_nm/pope_dc_92>.
ROME (Reuters) - Pope Benedict pledged the Roman Catholic Church to a new push for converts on Monday on his first papal visit outside the Vatican to the shrine of Christianity's first missionary.


Fresh from a jubilant audience with German pilgrims that shed the stress of his election and inauguration, the Pope, 78, journeyed to the southern suburbs of Rome to pray at the 4th century Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls.


The church, the largest in Rome after St. Peter's Basilica, has associations with the theme of Christian unity.


The Pope, however, used his visit to the reputed burial place of St. Paul, the co-founder of the Church with St. Peter and its first evangelizer, to make clear he saw a pressing need to revitalize the quest to spread the Catholic message.


"This is a pilgrimage I very much desired to make ... a pilgrimage, so to speak, to the roots of the mission," the Pope, the former Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, said in his homily.


"The Church is by its very nature missionary, its first task is evangelization," he said. "At the start of the third millennium, the Church feels with renewed vigor that the missionary mandate from Christ is more current than ever."


Earlier in the day, Benedict seemed almost overcome by joy and a touch of stage fright as he strode down the aisle of the Paul VI audience hall through a crowd of several thousand German pilgrims who had made the trip to Rome for his inauguration.


FIRST PAPAL JOKE


A shy Bavarian thrust into the limelight by his election last Tuesday, he smiled amid the flashing camera lights and touched grasping hands, then drew laughter and applause when he apologized for arriving late from an inter-religious meeting.


"Germans are known for being punctual -- it seems I've become a bit of an Italian," he joked.


He also recounted that he had begged God not to make him Pope as successive ballots by his fellow cardinals showed it was likely that "the guillotine would fall" on him.
Nicole Winfield. “New Pope jokes God spurned his prayer.” Yahoo!News. 26 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://www.guardian.co.uk/international/story/0,3604,1470509,00.html>.
Fresh from a jubilant audience with German pilgrims that shed the stress of his election and inauguration, the Pope, 78, journeyed to the southern suburbs of Rome to pray at the 4th century Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls.


The church, the largest in Rome after St. Peter's Basilica, has associations with the theme of Christian unity.


The Pope, however, used his visit to the reputed burial place of St. Paul, the co-founder of the Church with St. Peter and its first evangelizer, to make clear he saw a pressing need to revitalize the quest to spread the Catholic message.


"This is a pilgrimage I very much desired to make ... a pilgrimage, so to speak, to the roots of the mission," the Pope, the former Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, said in his homily.


"The Church is by its very nature missionary, its first task is evangelization," he said. "At the start of the third millennium, the Church feels with renewed vigor that the missionary mandate from Christ is more current than ever."


Earlier in the day, Benedict seemed almost overcome by joy and a touch of stage fright as he strode down the aisle of the Paul VI audience hall through a crowd of several thousand German pilgrims who had made the trip to Rome for his inauguration.


FIRST PAPAL JOKE


A shy Bavarian thrust into the limelight by his election last Tuesday, he smiled amid the flashing camera lights and touched grasping hands, then drew laughter and applause when he apologized for arriving late from an inter-religious meeting.


"Germans are known for being punctual -- it seems I've become a bit of an Italian," he joked.


He also recounted that he had begged God not to make him Pope as successive ballots by his fellow cardinals showed it was likely that "the guillotine would fall" on him.
also underscored that the former Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger - known as the stern guardian of the Vatican's conservative doctrine - has a sense of humour, knows how to work a crowd and seems to be winning fans.
"As the trend in the ballots slowly made me realise that, in a manner of speaking, the guillotine would fall on me, I started to feel quite dizzy," the Pope told his countrymen in his native German. "I thought that I had done my life's work and could now hope to live out my days in peace.

"I told the Lord with deep conviction, 'don't do this to me. You have younger and better [candidates] who could take up this great task with a totally different energy and with different strength'."

He said that during the secret deliberations, a fellow cardinal had written him a note, reminding him of the sermon he delivered during the funeral mass for Pope John Paul II, in which he referred to a biblical passage where God tells the apostle Peter to follow him. Benedict XVI officially began his pontificate on Sunday during a solemn installation mass which drew about 400,000 people to the Vatican area, including many world and religious leaders.
Michael Paulson. “Reaching out, Pope asks for unity.” The Boston Globe 25 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://www.guardian.co.uk/international/story/0,3604,1470509,00.html>.
Pope Benedict XVI, accepting the Ring of the Fisherman and the woolen mantle that symbolize his authority, yesterday declared the extraordinary outpouring of grief over the death of his predecessor to be evidence of the Roman Catholic Church's vitality and urged young people to embrace Christian faith.
Presiding at a festive inauguration Mass in St. Peter's Square, where just 16 days earlier he had led millions of mourners in a somber funeral Mass for Pope John Paul II, Benedict offered a plea for unity in his divided church and reached out to other Christians, to Jews, and to ''nonbelievers."

Archbishop O'Malley urges acceptance of new pontiff. B4

''How alone we all felt after the passing of John Paul II -- the pope who for over 26 years had been our shepherd and guide on our journey through life," said Benedict, wearing a golden chasuble and a golden miter and sitting in a white throne atop a stepped platform. ''And now, at this moment, weak servant of God that I am, I must assume this enormous task, which truly exceeds all human capacity. How can I do this? How will I be able to do it? . . . All the saints of God are there to protect me, to sustain me, and to carry me. And your prayers, my dear friends, your indulgence, your love, your faith, and your hope accompany me."
"John Paul's presence still felt at Vatican". Yahoo!News 25 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=518&ncid=2357&e=5&u=/ap/20050425/ap_on_re_eu/pope_s_ghost_4>.
Pope Benedict XVI won rousing applause when he borrowed some of his predecessor's most popular sound bites. Pilgrims snapped up postcards with the late pontiff's image. Polish flags appeared to outnumber German banners in packed St. Peter's Square.
"John Paul's presence still felt at Vatican". Yahoo!News 25 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=518&ncid=2357&e=5&u=/ap/20050425/ap_on_re_eu/pope_s_ghost_4>.
John Paul II's presence was keenly felt Sunday during the formal installation of his German successor Benedict as leader of the 1.1-billion member Roman Catholic Church.


Some in the crowd of 350,000 were torn between joy at welcoming their new pope and sadness that the man who guided them in their faith for 26 years had finished his earthly journey.


"There's pain on one side and joy on the other," said Grazyna Klimowicz, who led a pilgrimage of fellow Poles to pay tribute to John Paul in the grottoes under St. Peter's Basilica and to cheer on Benedict at Sunday's Mass.


Benedict has repeatedly signaled that he also cherishes John Paul, having served at his side as Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the Vatican's theological watchdog, for most of that papacy.


When he led John Paul's funeral April 8, Ratzinger assured mourners that the late pope was benevolently watching them from heaven.


On Sunday, Benedict again struck a sentimental note, invoking John Paul's words from his 1978 inauguration — "Do not be afraid" — and directing them to young people in Sunday's homily.


He then echoed another John Paul sound bite, that young people should "open wide the doors" to Christ.


From the first hours after John Paul's death, several cardinals and many rank-and-file Catholics hailed him as a "saint." Benedict appeared to both acknowledge this popular acclaim and the bewilderment of Catholics after the third-longest pontificate in history.


"How alone we all felt after the passing of John Paul II, the pope who for over 26 years had been our shepherd and guide on the journey through life," Benedict said.


Saying that "the saints from every age" are John Paul's "friends," Benedict offered another crowd-pleaser: "Now we know that he is among his own and is truly at home."


Photos of John Paul were selling briskly at shops and stalls near the square.


Antonietta Pezzulla bought a pack of postcards with images of John Paul for her three children, now in their 30s. They did not want any souvenirs of Benedict, she said.


"My children grew up with the old pope and they are attached to him," said the homemaker from southern Italy.


Rosa Napoli, who traveled from Sicily, said she does not have the same affection for the new pope that she had for John Paul.


"I'm a believer. But I admit that Benedict isn't as charismatic as the other one. I was in love with the last one," Napoli said.
"Bush insists on Bulton's nomination as US envoy to UN". English: people's daily online 24 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <>.
US President George W. Bush will hold to his nomination of John R. Bolton as the US ambassador to the United Nations, White House spokeswoman Christie Parell said Sunday.

"The president believes he's exactly the man needed at the United Nations," Parell said.

She made the statement after Democratic Senator Christopher Dodd said in a CBS interview that Bolton's nomination should withdraw from consideration or risk embarrassing the president.

Bolton, 55, currently under secretary of state for arms control and international security, was nominated to be American envoy to the United Nations in early March.

He has drawn praise from conservatives and most Republicans for his criticism of the United Nations, but Democrats and UN supporters have expressed criticism and concern.

Last week, the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee postponed a vote on Bolton's nomination to next month.

President Bush has urged the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to put aside politics and confirm Bolton.

Bolton has been a harsh critic of the UN bureaucracy and is thus a provocative choice to the United Nations. Moreover, Bolton has been accused of being a bully with a history of berating people he works with and of seeking to remove those who disagree with him.
"ACU will Score Fillibuster Vote in 2005 'Rating of Congress'". Yahoo!News 25 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/050425/dcm032.html?.v=7>.
The American Conservative Union today announced it would score the Senate procedural vote to end the Democrats' filibuster of President Bush's judicial nominees in its annual Rating of Congress, the gold standard scorecard among conservatives. "ACU rarely announces in advance the votes it will score," said ACU Chairman David A. Keene. "Our decision to announce that we will score the upcoming vote to end the filibuster demonstrates clearly how important ACU regards the need to restore fairness and the historic practices of the Senate on the issue of nominees to the federal bench."

"All of the highly qualified filibustered nominees deserve a fair up-or- down floor vote if the Senate is to fulfill its obligation under the Constitution. Republicans cannot permit a minority to change the rules and raise the bar to 60 votes needed to confirm judges. In 214 years of its history, this has never been the custom of the Senate. Such a change would be intolerable.

"ACU urges Majority leader Bill Frist to move forward with his plans to restore fairness to the process. ACU also urges all Republicans as well as fair-minded Democrats to support the Majority Leader," Keene said. "Simple fairness requires all nominees to be given an up-or-down vote."
Eddie Pells. "Colorado hires Tulsa Coach in womens basketball". Yahoo!News 26 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://www.signonsandiego.com/sports/college_basketball/20050426-1431-bkw-coloradocoach.html>.
BOULDER, Colo. – Colorado hired Tulsa's Kathy McConnell-Miller to replace Ceal Barry as women's basketball coach on Tuesday, ending a search that was prolonged when another coach accepted the job and then backed out.

Athletic director Mike Bohn told The Associated Press that McConnell-Miller will be introduced as coach at a news conference Wednesday.

She takes over a program that thrived for 22 years under Barry but struggled to a last-place finish in the Big 12 last season, which led to Berry's retirement.

Tulsa had won just 21 games in the three seasons before McConnell-Miller took over in 1999. It has averaged 15 wins since then and has gone to the WNIT two straight seasons. McConnell-Miller is 91-88 in six seasons at Tulsa.

"I feel like we've been blessed with some pretty good breaks to get her," Bohn said.

Colorado had agreed to terms with Wisconsin-Green Bay coach Kevin Borseth, but Borseth backed out on April 14, the day he was scheduled to be introduced. That coincided with Bohn's first full day as athletic director and gave him an urgent project right away.

Bohn said it was a great opportunity to work with Barry and the rest of the search committee.

"We got to use some real teamwork in the department, we pulled together and got a coach, and that was a real positive," he said.

Other candidates for the job were Melissa McFerrin of American University and Kamie Ethridge, an assistant at Kansas State.

McConnell-Miller played at Virginia in the mid-1980s, and was coached by Geno Auriemma, who was an assistant for the Cavaliers before going to Connecticut.

She was an assistant at Illinois, Rutgers and Pittsburgh before going to Tulsa. Much of her family is in coaching, as well. Her sister, Suzie McConnell-Serio is coach of the Minnesota Lynx of the WNBA.
"Broncos take chance on basketball player".Fox Sports 26 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/3573050?CMP=OTC-K9B140813162&ATT=5>.
So, they signed Wesley Duke on Tuesday, a player who could be the steal of the offseason if he turns out to be as good at football as he was at basketball.

Denver signed the four-year starter from Mercer, hoping the athleticism that helped him average 11.5 points, 7.2 rebounds and a little more than one block a game last season will translate to football. Duke also finished fourth in a dunking contest held during the weekend of the Final Four.

The Broncos didn't reveal where the 6-foot-5, 225-pound player will play, although he was listed as a tight end on the NFL.com draft website. Before going to Mercer, Duke played football and basketball and ran track at Meadowcreek High School in Norcross, Ga.

All-Pro tight end Antonio Gates of San Diego played basketball, not football, in college at Kent State.
"More Wrangling over Tom Delay". CBS News 21 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/04/21/politics/main689910.shtml>.
In an ethics stalemate that is rivaling the most partisan legislative struggles, House Republicans are proposing an investigation of Majority Leader Tom DeLay while threatening to put several Democrats under scrutiny as well.

Republicans made their second attempt in two weeks Wednesday to get a deadlocked House ethics committee functioning again, adding the new proposal to blunt Democratic demands for an investigation of DeLay. Some House Republicans have acknowledged the steady Democratic attacks have made them nervous.

Democrats gave no ground. They said they wouldn't allow the evenly divided committee to conduct investigations unless Republicans reversed a rule providing for automatic dismissal of cases.

The ethics committee's Republican chairman, Rep. Doc Hastings of Washington state, made the surprising offer to investigate DeLay, R-Texas. The proposal will go nowhere unless the Democrats provide votes to allow the committee to conduct business.

Democrats have criticized DeLay for taking foreign trips that may have been financed by clients of a lobbyist.

Lawmakers cannot accept trips from lobbyists, but DeLay has said he believed a nonprofit organization financed the travel as permitted under House rules.

Hastings proposed the DeLay investigation at a news conference flanked by three of the four other Republicans on the ethics panel. The committee also has five Democrats.

Senior committee Democrat Alan Mollohan of West Virginia quickly rejected the offer, saying his party would continue blocking the panel unless a bipartisan task force was appointed to write new rules for investigating lawmakers.

"The first principle in doing it right is that it be bipartisan," said Mollohan. "That's a beginning point for me."

Mollohan would not say whether he supported an investigation of DeLay, commenting that his effort to change the rules is "totally independent from any specific case."

Democrats want to revert to a rule in effect until last January, which provided for an automatic investigation if no action was taken on a complaint of wrongdoing. The new rules provide for automatic dismissal if the committee doesn't act within 45 days — a period that can be doubled if necessary.

"This is a problem that's going to continue until both sides sit down and decide how to organize themselves and what the rules of the committee can be," said CBS News National Political Correspondent Gloria Borger.
"Junkets didnt start with Tom Delay". CBS News 26 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://cbsnewyork.com/topstories/topstories_story_116122835.html>.
A new study shows that members of Congress have taken more than $16 million in privately financed trips over the past five years, with many of the trips sponsored by non-profit groups that are not obligated to disclose who paid the bills.

The results of the study by PoliticalMoneyLine, an Internet site that compiles campaign finance information, were first reported by USA Today.

The problems of House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas, have placed a spotlight on congressional travel. DeLay has been accused of a spate of alleged ethical lapses, including travel that may have been paid for by a lobbyist.

Congressional rules permit privately financed travel, provided the money doesn't come from a lobbyist or the representative of a foreign interest.

But the study shows that more than half the private money spent on congressional travel since 2000 - $8.8 million - came from non-profit organizations who are not obligated to identify who may be actually paying the bills.

Widespread interest in DeLay's woes have spread bipartisan jitters through the halls of Congress. The Washington Post reports that members are racing to put their travel and campaign finance records in order in case their own activities come under scrutiny.

The newspaper also said that some members are restricting privately financed travel or even halting it altogether because of affaire DeLay.

The PoliticalMoneyLine study reviewed 5,410 trips taken by 605 members of the House and Senate. Democratic lawmakers had the edge, taking 3,025 trips, to 2,375 trips for GOP members.

The No. 1 trip-taker in dollar terms was Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. Sensenbrenner took 19 trips valued at $168,000.

In contrast, DeLay finished 28th by taking 14 trips valued at $94,568.

Rep. Harold Ford Jr., D-Tenn., took the most trips - 63. But Ford's less expensive domestic jaunts only totaled $61,000.

Top travel destinations, besides the U.S., were Mexico and Israel.
Kristen Mack. "Dems still seeking DeLay Challenger". Houston Chronicle 26 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/rssstory.mpl/metropolitan/3152915>.
Sugar Land attorney Richard Morrison, the Democrat who challenged House Majority Leader Tom DeLay last year and said as recently as Friday that he would try again, said Monday that he won't make the race.

Morrison sent an e-mail to supporters announcing his decision. His departure leaves two prominent Democratic prospects, former U.S. Rep. Nick Lampson of Beaumont and Houston City Councilman Gordon Quan.

Morrison took 41 percent of the vote in last year's election for the 22nd District. DeLay, R-Sugar Land, won with 55 percent, and two other candidates split the rest.

Morrison told the Houston Chronicle that as the sole breadwinner in his family and with a fifth child due in August, he could not afford to run again. He said he already has placed his law practice on hold for two years.

"I've got to watch out for my family first and my financial condition," he said. "By the time I got to November (2006) I would be bankrupt. " Morrison has continued campaigning since last year's election, and has maintained a campaign Web site.

On Friday, he met with Lampson and Quan to discuss uniting behind a single candidate to avoid a divisive Democratic primary. Afterward, Morrison and Lampson said they were committed to the race, and Quan said he would form an exploratory committee.

In announcing his change of heart Monday, Morrison did not endorse Quan or Lampson but encouraged his supporters to back them.

"If I can be so bold, I demand that each one of you will commit to work as hard for Congressman Lampson or Councilman Quan as you did for me," he wrote. "Democracy will suffer if you slack off even one bit."
Caren Bohan. "Bush Backs Rep. DeLay Amid Ethics Allegations". 26 April 2005. 26 April 2005 <http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20050426/us_nm/bush_delay_dc_7>.
DeLay, the No. 2 Republican in the House of Representatives, has been dogged by questions about his ties to lobbyists, foreign trips funded by outside groups and use of campaign funds. Two House Republicans have said he should step aside for the good of his party.


White House aides underscored Bush's backing for DeLay -- who has denied wrongdoing -- as he joined the president at a Social Security event in their home state of Texas. Bush and DeLay flew back to Washington together aboard Air Force One.


Bush made no mention of the ethics controversy but he praised DeLay's efforts on important legislation. "I appreciate the leadership of Congressman Tom DeLay in working on important issues that matter to the country," he said.


White House spokesman Scott McClellan told reporters Bush supports DeLay "as strongly as he ever has, which is strongly."


"The president is very gracious and I always appreciated his support," DeLay told reporters after Air Force One arrived at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington.


Asked about a Washington Post report that an overseas trip he made in 2000 was charged to a lobbyist's credit card, DeLay said he "always believed" the trip was paid for by a nonprofit organization. "Other than that, I have no idea," he said.


The Social Security event was held at a medical school in Galveston, which is near DeLay's congressional district.


DeLay sat in the audience and smiled as Bush pitched his plan to add private accounts to the retirement system, a proposal that polls show is unpopular with many Americans.


The hand-picked audience of the president's supporters gave DeLay an enthusiastic welcome. Before Bush spoke, DeLay stood up and waved, drawing applause and some shouts of "We love you, Tom" and "Keep up the good work."


VOTE GATHERING SKILL


DeLay, widely admired among Republicans for his skill at rallying votes, has been a key force behind a number of Bush's legislative victories, such as a new prescription drug benefit for older Americans and curbs on class-action lawsuits.


Although they share a pride in their Texas roots, Bush and DeLay have more of a political friendship than a personal one.


Describing their relationship this month, White House spokesman Scott McClellan said DeLay was a "friend" in the way the president is friends with other congressional leaders but said the two were not "social friends."


White House deputy chief of staff Karl Rove, in an interview with USA Today, predicted DeLay would keep his job. "He's going to continue to be an effective and strong leader," Rove said.
Noelle Knox. "Pope Benedict XVI formally installed". 25 April 2005. 25 April 2005 <http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/usatoday/20050425/ts_usatoday/popebenedictxviformallyinstalled>.
About 500,000 people, including more than 100,000 Germans, filled St. Peter's Square and the wide street leading up to it, according to police estimates provided by the Vatican media office. Among the dignitaries seated in front of St. Peter's Basilica were Jeb Bush, the governor of Florida and brother of President Bush; German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder; and Great Britain's Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.


Joseph Ratzinger, 78, a cardinal from Germany, was elected Tuesday to succeed Pope John Paul II, who died April 2 after a 26-year papacy. Ratzinger chose his papal name partly in honor of Benedict XV (1914-22), who healed divisions in the church and tried to promote peace during World War I.


In a solemn homily, Benedict reached out to Jews and other non-Christians, and asserted that faith in Jesus brings relief in the deserts of loneliness, poverty, hunger and destroyed love. (Related item: Text of Pope Benedict XVI's homily in English)


Over the pope's golden vestments, a white wool stole, or pallium, embroidered with five silk crosses, was placed on his shoulders to symbolize his role as a shepherd. The gold signet ring emblazoned with the image of Peter with a boat and net was put on his right hand. This symbolizes Benedict's role as 264th successor to the Apostle Peter, who was a fisherman and the first pope.


"At this moment, weak servant of God that I am, I must assume this enormous task, which truly exceeds all human capacity," he said in the two-hour ceremony.


Ratzinger, as a cardinal, worked for 24 years in the Vatican as chief guardian of church orthodoxy as head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.


His sermon contained little mention of doctrinal matters, political issues or divisions among Catholics and between them and other faiths.


Benedict is the first German pontiff since the 11th century, and his Mass drew many pilgrims from his homeland to Rome on Sunday. More than 200, including Bernard Lehfeldt, 20, who traveled from Frieberg, camped overnight in the Circus Maximus, the stadium built in the sixth century. (Related item: Mass marks pope's installation in Germany)


"Some people said they don't agree with Cardinal Ratzinger's beliefs, that he was too tough," Lehfeldt said. "But that was his job. The job of a cardinal is different. The job of the pope is not the same. He has a lot to do, and I believe he will be a good pope."
“Bush says 'blunt' Bolton will be an asset at UN.” Stuff News 30 April 2005. 1 May 2005 <http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,3264527a12,00.html>.
President George W Bush said yesterday that John Bolton's "blunt" style would be an asset in pushing for reform at the United Nations, stepping up pressure on rebellious Republicans in the Senate to back his embattled choice for ambassador to the world body. Bush believes that Bolton will be blunt in many issues and will try to reform the UN in a good way. He believes that John Bolton will "get the job done".
"Bush says ’blunt’ Bolton will be an asset at UN." khaleej Times Online 29 April 2005. 1 May 2005 < http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticle.asp?xfile=data/theworld/2005/April/theworld_April654.xml&section=theworld&col=>. or <Khaleejtimes.com>.
President George W. Bush said on Thursday that John Bolton’s “blunt” style would be an asset in pushing for reform at the United Nations, stepping up pressure on rebellious Republicans in the Senate to back his embattled choice for ambassador to the world body.


Bush compared himself to Bolton, and said his nominee had already “given very good answers” to the questions that have been raised about his criticism of the United Nations and his treatment of subordinates.

The United Nations has “had some problems that we’ve all seen” that need to be addressed, Bush said.

“John Bolton’s a blunt guy. Sometimes people say I’m a little too blunt,” Bush told a news conference.

“If we expect the United Nations to be effective, it needs to clean up its problems. And I think it makes sense to have somebody representing the United States who will be straightforward about the issues.”

“John Bolton can get the job done,” Bush added.

Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney and other administration officials have been scrambling in recent days to put Bolton’s nomination on track after Republicans on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee were forced to postpone his confirmation vote because of a defection in their ranks.

The committee was in the process of interviewing some 20 people including former intelligence officials and Bolton’s subordinates about whether he tried to pressure analysts to write reports to conform with his hard-line views and whether he showed a pattern of abusive behavior.

Bush questioned the hold-up in the vote.
"Cuomo Warns against Filibuster Changes." ABC News 1 May 2005. 1 May 2005 <http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory?id=718932&CMP=OTC-RSSFeeds0312>.
Cuomo, in the Democratic Party's weekly radio address, said Senate Republicans "are threatening to claim ownership of the Supreme Court and other federal courts, hoping to achieve political results on subjects like abortion, stem cells, the environment and civil rights that they cannot get from the proper political bodies."
"How will they do this? By destroying the so-called filibuster, a vital part of the 200-year-old system of checks and balances in the Senate," Cuomo said.
"The Republicans say it would assure dominance by the majority in the Senate," he said. "That sounds democratic until you remember that the Bill of Rights was adopted, as James Madison pointed out, to protect all of Americans from what he called the `tyranny of the majority.'"
"It sounds nearly absurd when you learn that the minority Democrats in the Senate actually represent more Americans than the majority Republicans do," Cuomo said.
Democrats have blocked 10 of President Bush's appellate court choices through filibuster threats. Under current Senate rules, 60 votes are needed in the 100-member body to end a filibuster. Republicans are threatening to use their majority to change the rules and require only a simple majority vote to end a filibuster.
"The Republican senators should instead start working with the Democrats to address all the serious problems of this country in the proper forums in the Congress and in the presidency leaving the judges to be judges instead of a third political branch controlled by the whim of the politicians in power," Cuomo said.
Cuomo, who was leading in Democratic polls in late 1991 when he pulled the plug on a possible presidential bid, lost the New York governorship in 1994 as he sought a fourth term against current Republican Gov. George Pataki. He later turned down a chance to be considered by President Clinton for a Supreme Court seat.
"Cuomo Warns Against Filibuster changes." Yahoo! News 1 May 2005. 1 May 2005 <http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20050501/ap_on_go_co/democrats_filibuster_4>.
If Republicans rewrite Senate rules to more easily end filibusters, the country will experience "exactly the kind of `tyranny of the majority' that James Madison had in mind," former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo said Saturday.Cuomo, in the Democratic Party's weekly radio address, said Senate Republicans "are threatening to claim ownership of the Supreme Court and other federal courts, hoping to achieve political results on subjects like abortion, stem cells, the environment and civil rights that they cannot get from the proper political bodies."
"How will they do this? By destroying the so-called filibuster, a vital part of the 200-year-old system of checks and balances in the Senate," Cuomo said.
"The Republicans say it would assure dominance by the majority in the Senate," he said. "That sounds democratic until you remember that the Bill of Rights was adopted, as James Madison pointed out, to protect all of Americans from what he called the `tyranny of the majority.'"
"It sounds nearly absurd when you learn that the minority Democrats in the Senate actually represent more Americans than the majority Republicans do," Cuomo said.
The New York Times 1 May 2005. 1 May 2005 <http://www.nytimes.com/pages/books/bestseller/>.
1. MY LIFE SO FAR, by Jane Fonda
2. THE WORLD IS FLAT, by Thomas L. Friedman
3. BLINK, by Malcolm Gladwell
4. FREAKONOMICS, by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner
5. ON BULL----, by Harry G. Frankfurt