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20 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
altruism
motive to increase another's welfare without conscious regard for one's self-interests
social-exchange theory
human interactions are transactions that aim to maximize one's rewards and minimize one's costs
egoism
motive, which undelies all behavior, to increase one's own welfare; this is the oppostie of altruism, which aims to increase another's welfare
frustration-aggression theory
theory that frustration triggers a readiness to aggress - soda machine example
frustration
blolockin of goal-directed behavior
bystander effect
finding that a persin is less likely to provide help when there are other bystanders
door in the face technique
strategy for gaining concession: after someone first turns doen a large request, the same requester counteroffers with a more reasonable request
moral inclusion
regarding others as within one's circle of moral concern
moral exclusion
perception of certain individuals or groups as outside the boundary of which one applies moral values and rules of fairness
overjustification effect
result of bribing people to do what thtye arleady like doing: they may see their actions as externally controlled rather than intrinsically appealing
reciprocity norm
expectation that people will help, not hurt, those who have helped them
social capital
mutual support nad cooperation enabled by a social network
social-responsibility norm
expectationthat people will help those needing help
kin selection
idea that evolution has selected altruism toward one's close relatives to enhance the survival of mutually shared genes
empathy
vicarious experience of another's feelings; putting oneself in another's shoes
bystander effect
finding that a person is less likely to provide help when there are other bystanders
door-in-the-face technique
after someone first turns down a large request, the same requester counteroffers with a more reasonable request
ex: huge sundae....can i have two cookies then?
moral exclusions
perception of certain individuals or groups as outside the boundary within which one applies moral values and rules of fairness
moral inclusion
regarding others as within one's circle of moral concern
overjustification effect
result of bribing people to do what they are already doing, they may then see their actions as externally controlled rather than intrinsically appealing