• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/9

Click to flip

9 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
bony prominences most susceptable to skin breakdown
Sacurm
Heels
Trochanteric areas
Four physical factors that can lead to the development of pressure ulcers:
(a) Pressure – Mild pressure can produce ischemia in tissue after only two hours. This ischemia can then lead to tissue necrosis
(b) Shear - A shearing force is produced where the skin is against a fixed exterior surface while the subcutaneous tissues are subjected to lateral forces
(c) Friction – When the skin moves across another surface, abrasions can occur and cause burns
(d) Moisture – Moisture can lead to tissue maceration. If urinary or fecal incontinence is present, this can add a chemical irritant
Risk factors for skin breakdown
Recent hospitalization
Fracture
CVA
Low BMI
Fecal/urinary incontinence
Low serum albumin
Immobility
Bed/chair bound
DM
Anemia
Dry skin
Stage I: pressure ulcer
blanchable hyperemia
(47%)
Stage II: pressure ulcer
extension of ulcer through the epidermis
(33%)
superficial and presents clinically as an abrasion, blister, or shallow crater
Stage III: pressure ulcer
(14%) full-thickness skin loss with damage or necrosis of SC tissue
Presents clinically as a deep crater with or without undermining of adjacent tissue.
Stage IV: pressure ulcer
(6%) full-thickness rounds with extensive destruction, tissue necrosis, or damage to muscle, bone or supporting structures
Principles of Treatment of pressure ulcers
Debride wound
Clean wound
Use solutions that DON’T kill cells
DON’T use solutions that are cytotoxic i.e. hydrogen peroxide, Dahen’s Solution, or Betadine
Irrigate wound, using minimal force
Cover wound with appropriate dressing
Moist wound environment increase healing
40% faster than dry wounds
Any therapy that dehydrates the wound is detrimental
Types of Topical dressings
Polymer films
Polymer foams
Hydrogels
Hydrocolloids
Alginates
Biomembranes
SHOULD be left in place until wound fluid is leaking from the sides….ideally a period of days