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73 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Globe
Main theater of Shakespeare's plays
Tiring House
Area behind stage where actors rest
-help avoid distractions
Liberties
Areas in London where plays/theaters are located
-tends to be shady, , has hospitals full of lepers, brothels.
-links theater with some negative things and danger
Repertory Company
Works together to put on several plays (same company)
Lord Chamberlin’s Men/King’s Men
Shakespeare’s company (men’s)
Men’s Company/Boy’s Company
actors are men/boys
-no women ever on main London stages
Sharers
Principle adult players, have a financial stake, own part of the company
Boys
Smaller parts, hired people
Doubling
One actor plays more than one character
-can make a statement about parallels or opposites between roles. How are the characters that are doubled connected?
Chauncer
Medieval English writer
-Source of MSND
Ovid
Latin writer (metamorphosis)
-Source of MSND
New Comedy
Classical (Greece and Rome) flourished, some main characteristics-type characters, concerns for love
-Source of MSND
Tricky servants
character plays tricks on master (new comedy)
Senex irotus
angry old man, to be rebelled against, source of comedy, threat
Diction
word choice
Denouement
“untying” conclusion, problems get untied
Perspective
how the angle from which you look at something changes/affects the way you see it
Closure
-Aesthetic
-Political
how something ends, how the ending is created
-move to a different kind of verse
-first to impose has a “power” –used as a way to assert power
Off-rhyme/Slant-rhyme
almost, but not quite rhyming
Thematized
enclosed man-assertion of her power over him
Anaphora
beginning of lines and phrases with the same word
Epiphera
closing lines and sentences with the same word
Commutatio
reversal of order of words, to suggest reversal of meaning
Comedy
defined relationally -comedy ends happily
-vs. tragedy (ends sad, about evil)
Sonnet
14 line poem generally following rhyme pattern and usually about love, but also about politics and religion
Petrarch
-Rimesparse
-Canzoniere
Italian poet, wrote sonnets
-scattered rhyme (title for Petrarch’s sonnets)
Quatrain
group of 4 lines, 1 and 3, 2 and 4 rhyme
Volta
turns, changes meaning (in sonnet) generally occurs after line 8
Octet
a, b, b, a, a, b, b, a
Oxymoron
rhetorical figure language that links together opposites, usually 1 adjective & 1 noun
Blaz(s)on
description of a body, part by part, usually moving from head to foot.
-turned into parts instead of whole person, asserting masculine control
Procreation sonnets
he advises reader to get married
Deictic
pointed word, shows position relation
Ex: this, that, here, there, etc.
Nationalism
series of beliefs celebrating individual country
Renaissance
connected with rebirth of learning
-different periods in different countries
-wasn’t renaissance for everyone
-implies that learning had been lost
-focuses on bringing back- limits progress
Early modern
between middle ages and modern period
Elizabeth/Elizabethan
Tudor
ruled 2nd half of 16th century
-family on the throne in 16th century
James/Jacobean
Stuart
ruled after Elizabeth
-royal family
Baron
powerful aristocrat
Spanish Armada
Spanish navy defeated by England
Reformation
move from Catholicism to Protestant –economic change in England
Calvin and Luther
leader of reformation- protestant leaders
anaphora
beginning of lines and phrases with same word
epiphera
closing lines and sentences with same word
Commutatio
reversal of order of words, to suggest reversal of meaning
comedy
defined relationally v. tragedy
-ends happily, people being foolish
-ends sad, about evil
oxymoron
rhetorical figure language that links together opposites, usually 1 adjective and 1 noun
codpiece
pants taht showed off balls
dramatic irony
audience knows something the character doesn't
soliloquy
speech delivered on stage, character talking to themselves, apparently alone
-gives info, shows thoughts and emotions
seneca
playwright in classical Rome
-tragedies had a big impact, melodramatic
senecan monologue
way characters deliver soliloquies in Senecan drama
fourth wall
theory actors are in a separate world, unconscious of audience
alba, aubade
lovers talking at dawn
-type of poem
apostrophe
address to something inadament
anaphora
beginning of lines and phrases with same word
epiphera
closing lines and sentences with same word
Commutatio
reversal of order of words, to suggest reversal of meaning
comedy
defined relationally v. tragedy
-ends happily, people being foolish
-ends sad, about evil
oxymoron
rhetorical figure language that links together opposites, usually 1 adjective and 1 noun
codpiece
pants taht showed off balls
dramatic irony
audience knows something the character doesn't
soliloquy
speech delivered on stage, character talking to themselves, apparently alone
-gives info, shows thoughts and emotions
seneca
playwright in classical Rome
-tragedies had a big impact, melodramatic
senecan monologue
way characters deliver soliloquies in Senecan drama
fourth wall
theory actors are in a separate world, unconscious of audience
alba, aubade
lovers talking at dawn
-type of poem
apostrophe
address to something inadament
convention
-comedy=confusion->order
-tragedy=apparent order->loss
Aristotle
greek philosopher, scientist, writer of tragedies.
-suggests tragedies involve someone noble
-invokes pity and fear
hamartia
tragic flaw (Aristotle, greek)
Peripeteia
reversal, move from moment,
-going well to going terribly
anagorisis
recognition, person or basic truths