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13 Cards in this Set

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noun
: an established preference for something
predilection
comes to us through French, but it's based on the combination of the Latin "prae-" and "diligere" (meaning "to love"). Together they form "praediligere," a Latin verb meaning "to love more" or "to prefer." "Diligere" is also the root of English "diligent" and is based on the Latin verb "legere," which means "to gather" or "to read."
verb
: to change or alter greatly and often with grotesque or humorous effect
transmogrify
Latin prefix "trans-" means "across" or "beyond"
noun
1 a : work especially of a painful or laborious nature : toil b : a physical or mental exertion or piece of work : task, effort *c : agony, torment
2 : labor, parturition
travail
from "trepalium," the Late Latin name of an instrument of torture. from the Latin "tripalis," which means "having three stakes" (from "tri-," meaning "three," and "palus," meaning "stake"). From "trepalium" sprang the Anglo-French verb "travailler," which originally meant "to torment" but eventually acquired the milder senses "to labor" and "to journey."
adjective
1 : emptied of or lacking content
*2 : marked by lack of ideas or intelligence : stupid, inane
3 : devoid of serious occupation : idle
vacuous (missile)
shares the same root as "vacuum"—the Latin adjective "vacuus," meaning "empty."
verb
*1 : to abolish by authoritative action : annul
2 : to treat as nonexistent
abrogate
comes from the Latin root "rogare," which means "to propose a law," and "ab-," meaning "from" or "away."
adjective
*1 : reserved, modest
2 : affectedly modest, reserved, or serious : coy
demure
part of the French cultural exchange; etymologists think it may have derived from the Anglo-French verb "demurer," meaning "to linger.
verb
: to call together to a meeting
convoke
Latin verb "vocare" ("to call") and the noun from which it comes, "vox" (meaning "voice")
noun
: adherence to the highest principles and ideals : uprightness
probity
descends from Latin "probus," meaning "honest," implies tried and proven honesty or integrity.
verb
: to instruct and improve especially in moral and religious knowledge; also : enlighten, inform
edify
aedes," meaning "house" or "temple," is the root of "aedificare," a verb meaning "to erect a house." used to mean "to build"
verb
*1 : to check or stop the flow of; also : to stop the flow of blood from (a wound)
2 a : to stop or check in its course b : to make watertight : stop up
stanch
verb
1 : to beat with or as if with a short heavy club
*2 : to criticize severely
fustigate
when it first appeared in the 17th century, originally meant "to cudgel or beat with a short heavy stick," a sense that reflects the word's derivation from the Latin noun "fustis," which means "club" or "staff."
verb

*1: to expose to shame or blame by means of falsehood and misrepresentation
2: violate, betray
traduce
noun

: laborious or intensive study; also : the product of such study — usually used in plural
lucubration
from the Latin verb "lucubrare," meaning "to work by lamplight" (yes, that Latin root is related to "lux," the Latin word for "light"); imagine one who studies late at night by the lamp :D