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6 Cards in this Set

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What is a sentence modifier?
A word, phrase, or clause that modifies the sentence as a whole. (page 196-197)
Vocative
Noun or noun phrase of direct address. It modifies the sentence as a whole. Can come at the beginning, middle, or end of the sentence and is set off by commas. Term "direct address" = to direct the writer's or speaker's message to a particular person or group. (pg. 198)
Interjection
A word considered independent of the main sentence, often punctuated with an exclamation point: EX: "Oh, don't frighten me like that." "Wow! That's not what I expected." (pg. 198-199)
Subordinate Clause
A dependent clause introduced by a subordinating conjunction, such as if, since, because, and although. A subordinating conjunction turns a complete sentence into a subordinate clause and expresses the connection between the subordinate clause and the main clause. (page 200-201)
Elliptical clause
A clause in which a part has been left out but is understood. EX: "When (you are) planning your essay, be sure to consider the audience."
Absolute phrase/ Nominative absolute
A structure independent from the main sentence; in form the absolute phrase is a noun phrase that includes a postnoun modifier. The modifier is commonly an -en or -ing participle or participial phrase, but it can also be a prepositional phrase, an adjective phrase or a noun phrase. The absolute phrase introduces an idea related to the sentence as a whole. Two kinds of absolute phrases: one that explains a cause or condition or adds a detail or point of focus to the idea stated in the main clause.