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55 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
hearing impairment
less than normal hearing (either sensitivity or speech understanding) resulting from auditory disorders
hearing sensitivity loss
poorer than normal auditory sensitivity for sounds; usually measured in decibels, using pure tones
deaf
limited or absent hearing for ordinary purposes of daily living
residual hearing
remaining usable hearing in a person with hearing loss
hard of hearing
refers to a person who has hearing loss but uses the auditory channel as the primary avenue for oral communication, with or without a hearing aid
minimal hearing loss
technically not a hearing loss; individual experiences difficulty hearing spoken language at a distance or when background noise is present
cochlea
shell or spiral-shaped structure in the inner ear that is responsible for hearing
conductive hearing loss
the loss of sound sensitivity produced by abnormalities of the outer ear and/or middle ear
sensorineural hearing loss
the loss of sound sensitivity produced by abnormalities of the inner ear or nerve pathways beyond the inner ear to the brain
audiologist
a professional who studies the science of hearing, including anatomy, function, and disorders, and provides education and treatment for those with hearing loss
hearing impairment
less than normal hearing (either sensitivity or speech understanding) resulting from auditory disorders
hearing sensitivity loss
poorer than normal auditory sensitivity for sounds; usually measured in decibels, using pure tones
deaf
limited or absent hearing for ordinary purposes of daily living
residual hearing
remaining usable hearing in a person with hearing loss
hard of hearing
refers to a person who has hearing loss but uses the auditory channel as the primary avenue for oral communication, with or without a hearing aid
minimal hearing loss
technically not a hearing loss; individual experiences difficulty hearing spoken language at a distance or when background noise is present
cochlea
shell or spiral-shaped structure in the inner ear that is responsible for hearing
conductive hearing loss
the loss of sound sensitivity produced by abnormalities of the outer ear and/or middle ear
sensorineural hearing loss
the loss of sound sensitivity produced by abnormalities of the inner ear or nerve pathways beyond the inner ear to the brain
audiologist
a professional who studies the science of hearing, including anatomy, function, and disorders, and provides education and treatment for those with hearing loss
audiogram
a graphic representation of audiometric findings showing hearing thresholds as a function of frequency
frequency
the number of vibrations per second of a given sound wave, typically measured as cycles per second (cps) or hertz (Hz)
hertz (Hz)
a unit of measurement for sound frequency, expressed as cycles per second (cps)
decibels (dB)
a unit of measure expressing the magnitude of a sound relative to the softest sound to which the normal human ear can respond
atresia
the absence or closure of the ear canal; can be congenital or acquired from injury or disease
Why is important to know the age of onset, type, and degree of hearing loss?
they have significant implications for treatment and education
What are the four major causes of hearing impairments? Give examples related to each one.
genetic/hereditary: Waardenburg Syndrome, Usher Syndrome, Down Syndrome; infections: cytomegalovirus (CMV), meningitis; developmental abnormalities: atresia; environmental/traumatic factors: ototoxicity
What is the primary difference between prelingual and postlingual hearing loss?
prelingual is the disordered hearing present at birth or before the development of speech and language, postlingual describes the deficit acquired after the acquistion or speech and language
What are the major areas of development that are usually affected by a hearing impairment? What is the impact on the student's educational achievement?
intelligence, speech and language, social development, educational achievement, the students may be significantly delayed in comparison to their peers with normal hearing
Why is early identification of a hearing impairment important?
for speech and language development
What is the youngest age a child can be screened for a hearing impairment?
new borns
What type of information does an audiogram provide?
auditory thresholds
visual impairment
an impairment in vision that, even with correction, adversly affects an individual's educational performance. the term includes both partial sight and blindness
visual acuity
the ability to visually perceive details of near or distant objects
visual field
the amount of vision in the quadrant regions to the right, left, above, and below while gazing straight ahead
low vision
a visual impairment that interferes with the ability to perform daily activities and in which the primary channel of learning is through the use of prescription and nonprescription devices
residual vision
an individual's usable vision
functionally blind
an educational description when the primary channel of learning is through tactile and auditory means
Snellen chart
an eye chary of clinical measurement of the true amount of distance vision an individual has under certain conditions
primary literacy medium
an individual's most frequently used method of reading and writing
braille
a communication system utilizing raised apprehension of written materials for tactual interpretation
vision screening
a simple measure to determine possible vision loss
orientation and mobility (O&M)
systematic techniques to plan routes and move from place to place for persons with visual impairments
What is the legal definition of blindness? How does it differ from the IDEA definition?
the legal definition is a visual acuity of 20/200 or less in the better eye with correction or a visual field that is no greater than 20 degrees, it differs from the IDEA definition because it does not mention education
What does the Snellen chart assess? What doe 20/200 mean?
asses the true amount of distance vision an individual has under certain conditions, 20 refers to the distance at which visual acuity is measured and 200 indicates the distance from which a person with normal vision would be able to identify the largest symbol on the pie chart
Why is early detection of vision problems important?
it can determine the prognosis for visual impairments
Define the term learning media and give 3 examples of different forms.
includes the materials and methods a student uses in conjunction with the sensory channels in the process of learning; visual learning media: pictures, videos, imitation, demonstration; tactual learning media: models, real objects, physical prompting; auditory learning media: verbal communication, taped information, environmental sounds
What are some technology accommodations?
book on tape, Braille book, computer, screen reader, Braille printer, print printer
teratogen
infections, drugs, chemicals, or environmental agents that can produce fetal abnormalities
CHARGE association
a rare genetic disorder resulting in deaf-blindeness, a syndrome representing a cluster of physical abnormalities at birth
Usher Syndrome
an inherited disorder resulting in deaf-blindness, deafness present at birth accompanied by progressive vision loss, sometimes associated with intellectual disabilities
TORCH
toxoplasmosis, other, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes
supported (competitive) employment
at a work site for typical workers, individuals woth disabilities are employed and work alongside their typical peers but receive ongoing assistance from a job coach
spread
the practice of spreading inferences to other unrelated aspects of a disability, often resulting in stereotyping
explain the step you would take if a tonic-clonic seizure occured in your classroom
stay calm and note time of onset, move furniture out of way to prevent injury, loosen shirt collar and put something soft under head, turn student on his or her side to allow saliva to drain out of mouth, call an ambulance