Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/188

Click to flip

188 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Clinical Practice
_____ seeks to alleviate the internalized negative effects of environmental factors such as stress from health, vocatioinal, family, and interpersonal problems
Social Workers help
___ individuals, couples, and families to modify attitudes, feelings and coping behaviors that interfere with optimal social functioning.
Clinical Practice is conducted in
agencies or private practice settings.
Different theorists differentiate clinical practice from other practice by
its goal of helping individuals change, facilitating personal adjustment, treating emotional disorders and mental illness or enhancing intrapsychic or interpersonal functioning.
Like all social work practice, assessment is psychosocial
focused on the person in environment with the goal of enhancing social functioning.
Psychosocial focuses on
Intrapsychic and interpersonal change
Psychosocial is based on
Psychoanalytic theory, ego psychology, role and systems theory.
Problem solving
to solve discrete problems, based on psychosocial and functional approaches.
Behavior Modification is used for
symptom reduction of problem behaviors and learning alternative positive behaviors.
Cognitive Therapy is used for
symptom reduction of negative thoughts, distorted thinking, and dysfunctional beliefs.
Crisis Intervention used for
brief treatment of reactions to crisis situations and reestablich the client's equilbrium
Family Therapy is used for
treat the whole family system and sees the individual symptom bearer as indicative of a problem in the family as a whole.
Group Therapy is used for
A practice model in which group members can help and be helped by others with similar problems, get validation for thier own experiences, and test new social identities and roles.
Narrative Therapy is used for
Uses the storeis that people tell about their lives as revealing how they structure perceptions of their experiences. Therapist co-constructs alternative, more affirming storeies with client.
Ecological or Life Model
Focuses on Life transitions, environmental pressures, and the maladaptive fit between individual and family or the larger environment. Focuses on the interaction and interdependance of people and environments.
Task Centered is used for
focuses on accomplishing tasks to reinforce self esteem and reestablish usual capacity for coping
Assumptions and Knowledge base.
Individual growth, development, and behavior result from complex interaction of psychological and environmental factors
Individual growth, development and behaviors
are a result from complex interaction of psychological and environmental factors
Theories of personality development
systems theroy, clinical diagnosis:DSM IV-TR, Sociocultural factors
sociocultural factors
are significant influence, including ethnicity, immigration status, occupation, race, gender, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic class
Methodology
The Ongoing clinical process includes
Methodology
Problem Assessment, Planning for Change, Determining the intervention locus, Evaluating change in order to
Problem Assessment
To identify forces that contribue to or maintain the problem
Problem Assessment
Stresses that may impair functioning can orginate in the individual, the individaul's system (family),or the system's environment (peer group,school, neighborhood).
Problem Assessment
DSM IV-TR is a resource used to categorize and describe the characteristics and severity of problems. It does not go beyound description and ategorization and does not seek to incorporate etiology.
Problem Assessment
Assessment is done to evaluate the client's strengths, to appraise the client system's strength and weakesses and to identify supports or constraints that may influence change possiblities.
Planning for change
Identify specific treatment goals, select appropriate change strategies
Planning for Change
Criteria for selecting intervention strategies:
1. should be consistent with objectives.
2.Should be evidence that strategy is effective.
3. Must be consistent with professional values.
Determining the intervention locus.
Behavioral, Affective, Cognitive
Determining the intervention locus
Behavioral--Modify actions
Affective --Modify feelings
Cognitive -- Modify thoughts or thought patterns.
Evaluating change in order to
a: Assess progress in achieving treatment goals
b: Assess effectiveness of treatment interventions
c: Determine areas still needing work.
Beginning Stage of Clinical Practice
Begining Stage---Assessment
2. Match between presenting problem and available services, contracting wiht resistant clients
Assessment / Match between presenting problem and available services
Does the agency or private practice setting offer the appropriate services and have the needed skills to address the client's presenting problem effectiveley?
Assessment / Match between presenting problem and available services
Should the client remain with this worker or agency or be referred elesewhere?
Assessment / Match between presenting problem and available services
Understanding of the client's problems depends largely on data collected in early interviews that is expanded as treatment progresses. Study involves the ongoing collection of data and continuing reassessment of the client
Assessment / Match between presenting problem and available services
Other sources of data: Interviewing other family members, home visits, collateral contacts with teachers, clergy doctors, social agencies, friends
Assessment / Match between presenting problem and available services
Clinical dagnosis. Diagnosis is a product of the worker's understanding of the client's problems based on the data collected. This process is possible because of te client's willingness to discuss problems and the worker's interest and skill in understandign and interpreting. Worker notes symptoms characteristic of known clincial and personality disorders. This is an attempt to define or classify the basic manner in which the client functions and to understand the areas in which the client dysfunctional. Clinical diagnosis categorizes the client's functioning. Diagnosis also includes relvant medical illnesses or physical conditions and their influence onthe client's emotional life and functioning.
Stages of Clinical Practice/ Beginning Stages
1.Assessment
2.Establishing a positive therapeutic relationship
3. Contracting or goal setting
Establishing a positive therapeutic relationship
Characteristics of the worker: Nonpossesssive warmth and concern, geniiness, appropriate emapaty, nonjudgmental acceptance, optimism about the possibilites for change, objecttivity regarding the cient and the client's situation, professional knowledge ad competence, the capacity to communiate with the client and self awareness. Consider suing self disclosure only when purposeful for clients benefits
Establishing a positive therapeutic relationship
Needs of the client: Hope and courage to engage in the change process motivation to change, trust in the worker's interest and skill to help to be dealt with as an individual rather than a case, personality type or category to express self to be accepted as a person of worth, to make ones own choices and to change at ones own pace.
Contracting or setting
Not limited to an intial working agreement, but part of the total socail work process
Contracting or goal setting
Helpful in facilitating client's activity in problem solving, maintaining a focus, and continuing in therapy.
Contracting or goal setting
An explicit agreement between the worker and client regarding target problems, goals and strategies of social work intervention and differentiating the roles and tasks of the client and the worker.
Contracting or goal setting
Mutual agreement. Determined in a reciprocal process between client and worker. Must be established at the beginning and monitored throughout to avoid hidden agendas.
Contracting or goal setting
Differentiated participation. Worker is responsible for delineating unique aspects of his or her participation at each phase of the process.
Contracting or goal setting
Reciprocal accountability. The client and the worker are each accountable to the other for fulfilling agreed upon work toward agreed upon goals.
Contracting or goal setting
Explicitness. Work is specific, clear, and open. No implicit or covert contracts or discrepant client worker expectations.
Contracting or goal setting
Realistic. Agreement is within the capacities of client and worker
Contracting or goal setting
Flexibility. To guard against rigidity, includes provisions for renegotiation by mutual consent.
Contracting with resistant clients
The worker recognizes, accepts, and addresses his/her own resistance if present
Contracting with resistant clients
The worker recognizes and accepts client's resistance, whether due to negative experiences with professionals, fear of worker's authority, or fear of change.
Contracting with resistant clients
Client resistance may be expressed passively or through open hostility.
Contracting with resistant clients
The worker explores client's reactions (resistance) and strategizes on how to work with them.
Contracting with resistant clients
Limitations. Difficult to contract with involuntary clients who do not acknowledge or recognize problems or who see the worker as marginal or unhelpful and with very severely disturbed or mentally retarded clients. Useful to openly acknowledge the difficulty for both worker and client inherent in mandatory treatmetn and to negotiate a contract.
Beginning Stage
1. Assessment
2. Establishing a positive 3. therapeutic relationship
Contracting or goal setting
Middle Stage
Worker's intervention. Continue to work of the beginning sate with more emphasis on helping the client resolve problems and make changes in feelings, behavior or way of thinking.
Middle Stage
Supporting or sustaining. To reduce the client's feeling of anxiety, poor self esteem and low self confidence, the worker expresses confidence in or esteem for the client, interest in and acceptance of the client and a desire to hel. Expressed through interest, sympathetic listeningk, acceptance of client, honest reassurance and encouragement.
Middle Stage
Direct influence. Worker gives advice or suggestions to influence the client.
Middle Stage
Exploration. Worker's continued effort to understanc the client's view of self and his or situation.
Middle Stage
The worker encourages the client's reflection on pattern dynamics and underlying personality dynamics adversely affecting current adaptation. The focus isonconscious and preconscious, rather than unconscious material. The worker is sensitive to manifest (what is expressed) and latent (underlying material) content.
Middle Stage
Confrontation. The worker finds ways to challenge the client to think about discrepancies in what he says or does, other maladaptive behavior, or about resistance to treatment or to change, e.g. evasiveness, pregnant, silences, lateness, missed appointments, tasks not worked on.
Middle Stage
Clarification. Acccomplished through questions, repeating rephrasing material the client brings up. Requires sensitivity to the client's defensiveness.
Middle Stage
Interpretation. Used with clients who are not emotionally fragile. The worker suggests the psychodynamic meaning of the client's thoughts, feelings and fantasies, especially about the origins of problem behaviors. Aims at enhancing the client's insight and working through of conflictual material by deepening and extending the client's conscious understanding.
Middle Stage
Interpretation may involve, Uncovering repressed (unconscious process) or suppressed (Conscious process) material.
Middle Stage
Interpretation may involve, connecting the present to past so the client can see present distortions more clearly.
Middle Stage
Interpretation may involve Integration of material from various sources so the client gains a more realistic perspective on his or her situation.
Middle Stage
Partialization. To facilitate the client feeling less overwhelmed and more empowered to problem solve, break down problems or goals into smaller, more manageable components. Then prioritize the components into a hierarchy of importance to the client or those that are more manageable to address first
Middle Stage
Universalization. Problems are normalized or presented as part of the human condition to reduce their being seen as pathological.
Middle Stage
Ventilation. The client airs feelings associated with the data presented about oneself and the situation. The release of emotions may help reduce the intensity of the client's feelings, the feeling that they are unspeakable or the client must be alone with them. Worker may need to distinguish between times when ventilation is useful to reducethe intensity and when it "feeds the fire."
Middle Stage
Catharsis. Reliving and consciously examining represed, early life or traumatic experiences in treatment to achieve abreaction, the release of tension or anxiety that was caused by conflict and its repression.
Middle Stage
1.Supporting or sustaining 2. Direct influence 3. Exploration 4. The worker encourages the client's reflections andrespond to enhance the client's insight. 5. The worker encourages the client's reflection on pattern dynamics and underlying personality dynamics adversely affecting current adaptation.
Middle Stage
1. Confrontation 2. Clarification 3. Intrepretation 4. Partialization 5. Unversalization 6. Ventilation 7. Catharsis
Special Considerations in Treatment
Resistance. In psychodynamic terms, resistance is unconscious defense against painful or repressed material. It can be expressed through silence, evasiveness, balking at the worker should recognize and understand reistance as an opprtunity to learn more about the client and then work empathically with the client to face resistance and understand when and how to use it effectively.
Special Considerations in Treatment
Transference. Client's unconscious attempts to recapitulate with worker the conflicts attached to a relationship experienced with significant persons in the past. The worker needs to help the client understand dynamics of transference, how it relates to past relationships, and how it contributes to present relationship difficulties. The worker must be awarre of self, reality of clinical situation and relationship, and of the client's conflict that are revealed through transference.
Special Considerations in Treatment
Counter Transference. The therapist's unconscious distorted perceptions and responses to the client based on emotional conflicts regarding a significant person from social workers' past. Worker needs to understand counteransference reactions, be aware of thier presence and consequences, and use supervisory help or therapy to understand them and not impose them on the client.
Ending Stage
1. Use of termination phase of treatment 2.Factors that affect the client's ending 3. The client's dynfunctional responses to ending 4. The worker's role
Use of the termination phase of treatment
Provides a unique opportunity to rework old, unfinished issues. Often initial symptoms of presenting problem reemeerge at time of termination. This is nont a reason to continue treatment, but should be worked on within the termination period to consolidate earlier gains made.
Use of the termination phase of treatment
Provides growth opportunity for coping constructively with loss and endings. Acknowledge, articulate, and manage feelings about ending: anger, sadness, success, disappointment, abandonment. An opportunity to reconsider the meaning of prior losses in the client's life.
Use of the termination phase of treatment
Evaluate treatment and the treatment relationship. What treatment goals were met? What was effective withi the treatment that facilitated growth? What did not work effectively? What facilitated meeting treatment goals from the client's resources outside treatment and which may continue as resurces beyond termination?
Factors that affect the client's ending
Degree of client's involvement in treatment
Factors that affect the client's ending
Degree of success and satisfaction
Factors that affect the client's ending
The client's earlier losses
Factors that affect the client's ending
Mastery of early life Separation - Individualization stage of development
Factors that affect the client's ending
Reason for ending. May be more intense if worker leaves and ending is perceived as against the client's wishes or as a rejection or narcissistic injury to self esteem.
Factors that affect the client's ending
Timing. Is ending occuring at a difficult or a propitious moment in the client's life?
Factors that affect the client's ending
Is termination with one worker part of a transfer plan to begin with a new worker? In this case, the evaluation phase of work should be used to formulate ideas about the focus and goals for the next treatment relationship.
The client's dysfunctional responses to ending
Clinging to therapy and to the worker to protect self from anxious and angry feelings
The client's dysfunctional responses to ending
The client resists reworking old problems and symptoms if they recur during termination
The client's dysfunctional responses to ending
Introducing new problems to avoid ending
The client's dysfunctional responses to ending
Finding new relationships as an escape from dealing with pain of ending with the worker. By contrast, it is constructive to acknowledge feelings about losing the worker and to reinforce the value of other resources in the client's life
The client's dysfunctional responses to ending
Defensive reactions. Client may deny or devalue the work and the worker to deny feelings about losing something of value. The client may act out feelings of tension, anxiety, depression through self-defeating behaviors, e.g. lateness, explosiveness, premature ending.
The worker's role
Plan adequate time for termination. In long term treatment, this would be four to eight sessions.
The worker's role
Inform the client if ending prematurely.
The worker's role
Be aware of countertransference attitudes and behaviors about ending.
The worker's role
Remain sensitive, observant, empathic, and responsive to the client's response to ending.
The worker's role
Encourage the client's belief in ability to take care of self and to direct his or her own life.
The worker's role
Present the possibility of future contact at times of difficulty. Review the client's' internal and environmental resources that can be drawn on before deciding to reenter treatment.
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR)
Comprehensive description of the symptoms and manifestations of mental disordrs and associated information; eg prevalence, major features of various disorders.
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR)
Does not discuss etiology
Diagnostic0 and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR)
Is descriptive, delineating the clinical features of disorders and offering specific diagnostic criteria for the use of clincians.
Multaxial evaluation
AXIS I
Clinical Disorders, e.g. Schizophrenia, Delusional Disorder, Mood Disorder, and other conditions that may be a focus of clinical attention. A person may have more than one Axis I diagnosis.
Multaxial evaluation
AXIS II
Personality Disorders or Mental Retardation. A person may have more than one Axis II diagnosis
Multaxial evaluation
AXIS III
Physical Disorders and Conditions. These are medical diagnosis, or that have either directly cause or somewhat contribute to an Axis I diagnosis, or that have important treatment implications, or that influence the choice of psychotropic medication
Multaxial evaluation
AXIS IV.
Psychosocial and environmental problems that affect diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. The problem can be events (death in the family) and may include lack of family or community supports or resources. The problems can be pecipitants or consequences of pathology.
Multaxial evaluation
AXIS V,
Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). A numerical designation reflectingcurrent functioning and/ or the highest level of functioning in the past year by considering the person's psychological, social, and occupational functioning.
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR) Cultural Assessment
Evaluation of the impact of cultural context, cultural belief systems, and cultural differences between client and interviewer in assessing illness behavior. Includes Culture Bound Syndromes.
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR) Defensive Functioning Scale
An assessment of the client's defenses or coping patterns at the time of the evaluation and the period preceeding it.
Axis I
Disorders usually first diagnosed in Infancy, Childhood, or Adolescence
Characteristics of Childhood Disorders inDSM IV-TR
They were revised. They are primarily disorders of abnormal development and maturation. eg. the inability to attain certain normal developmental skills.
Characteristics of Childhood Disorders inDSM IV-TR
It is common for children to have more than one diagnosis eg. ADHD and Conduct Disorder
Characteristics of Childhood Disorders inDSM IV-TR
Eating Disorders and Gender Identity Disorders were moved from the child section in DSM IV TR.
Characteristics of Childhood Disorders inDSM IV-TR
Mental Retardation is an Axis II diagnosis and is found in this outline under Axis II.
Learning Disorders for Reading, Mathematics, or Written Expression.
These diagnoses are determined through the use of individualy administred, standardized test when the child scores substantially below expectations for age, grade level, or intellectual level.
Motor skills Disorder
Developmental Coordination Disorders. Motor coordination is substantially below or markedly delayed for the child's age and measured intelligence.
Communciation Disorders
Expressive or receptive language disorders
Communciation Disorders
Phonological (articulation) or stuttering disorders.
Pervasive Developmental Disorders
A spectrum of disorders taht are characterized by qualitative impairment in reciprocal social interaction, impairment in communication skills, and stereotyped behavior, interests, and activities.
Pervasive Developmental Disorders / Autistic Disorder
Onset before three years of delays or abnormal functioning in social interaction, language for soical communication and or symbolic or imaginative play. Non verbal communication is not used or understood spontaneously. There is a restricted or stereotyped repertoire of activities and intersts, and a lack of peer relationships or reciprocal interpersonal sharing
Pervasive Developmental Disorders / Rett's Disorder
Normal development until five months, followed by severe deterioration of head growth and hand skills, and later loss of social interaction, language development and psychomotor capacity.
Pervasive Developmental Disorders / Childhood Disintegrative disorder
At least two years of normal development, followed by deterioration of language skills and social interaction, and onset of sterotyped behaviors and interestrs.
Pervasive Developmental Disorders / Asperger's Disorder
Social impairment and restricted behaviors and interests, but with normal language and cognitive development.
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders / Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Inattentive and or hyperactive, impulsive types. Symptoms persist for at least six months and include difficulty staying focused being easily distracted, fidgeting acting "driven." Symptoms are not motivated by anger or the wish to displease or spite others. Treatment by medication and or Behavior Modification.
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders / Conduct Disorder
Persistent pattern of behavior in which other's rights and property are violated and significant age - appropriate rules or societal norms are ignored: agrresion and destruction of property are common.
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders / Oppositinal Defiant Disorder
Pattern of negative, hostile, and defiant behavior with less serious vioatons of the basic rights of others that characterize Conduct Disorder. Behavior is motivated by interpersonal ractivity or a resntful puower struggle with adults.
Feeding and Eating Disorders of Infancy or Early Childhood / Pica
Persistent eating of nonnutritive substance such as paint hair, sand, clth, pebbles, without aversion to food.
Feeding and Eating Disorders of Infancy or Early Childhood / Rumination Disorder
Regurgitation and rechewing of food.
Tic Disorders
Characterized by rapid recurrent steroptyped motor movements or vocalizations.
Tic Disorders / Tourette's Disorder
Multiple motor tics and one or more vocal tics
Tic Disorders / Chronic Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder
Either motor or vocal tics
Tic Disorders / Transient Tic Disorder
Like Tourette's but less severe and symptoms end within 12 months.
Elimination Disorders / Encopresis
Repeated passage of feces in inappropriate places
Tic Disorders/ Enuresis
Repeated voiding of urine during day or night in bedding or clothes after continence would be expected.
Other Disorders of Infancy, Childhood and Adolescence / Separation Anxiety Disorder
Excessive distress wehn separated from major attachment figure(s): sleep refusal unless near that person.
Other Disorders of Infancy, Childhood and Adolescence / Reactive Attachment Disorder
A lack of attachment or indiscriminate, superficial attachments.
Other Disorders of Infancy, Childhood and Adolescence / Selective Mutism
Not Speaking in specific social situations though having the ability to communicate.
Other Disorders of Infancy, Childhood and Adolescence / Stereotype / Movement Disorder
Repetitive, driven motor behavior e.g. hand waving picking, head banging, rocking.
Delrium, Dementia, Amnestic, and other Cognitive Disorders.//Delrium
Disturbance in consciousness or cognition that develops over a short period of time and is due to a medical conditon or substance induced.
Delrium, Dementia, Amnestic, and other Cognitive Disorders.// Dementia
Memory impairment, multiple cognitive deficits. Includes Alzheimer's (gradual onset woth progessive deterioration) Vascular Dementia, Dementia due to HIV disease, Parkinson's or toher medical conditions.
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, and other Cognitive Disorders // Amnestic Disorder
Memory impairment without other cognitive impairments. May be subastance induced, e.g. Lorsakoff's Syndrome (alcohol).
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, and other Cognitive Disorders //
Mental Disorders due to General Medical Contion. Delirium, Dementia or Amnestic Disorder, psychosis, mood disorder, sexual dysfunction, sleep disorder or personality change due to medical conditions, e.g. epilepsy, tumors, head trauma
Substance Related Disorders
May be caused by abusing a drug, by side effects of a medication, or by toxin exposure
Substance Related Disorders// Substance Dependence
Maladaptive pattern of drug use with increased tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, compulsive use or behavior problems.
Substance Related Disorders// Substance Abuse.
Social role, legal, or medical problems due to drug use
Substance Related Disorders// Substance Intoxication or Withdrawl
Behavioral, psychological, and physiological symptoms due to effects of the substance; will vary depending on type of substance, e.g. hallucinations, insomnia, stupor, agitation.
Substance Related Disorders//
The client may also have substance induced delirium, dementia, psychosis, mood disorderes, anxiety disorders, sexual or sleep dysfunction. Treatment must first focus on the substance.
Substance Related Disorders//
Treatment options includeoutpatient or inpatient: residential or day car; group, individual, and or family counseling; methadone maintenance (for opiates); detoxification; self helpl groups; combination of therapies and medicaiton.
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders.
Characterized by psychotic symptoms during an active phase: delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech, thught disorders e.g. loose associations or poverty of content. Negative symptoms e.g. flat affect. alogia or avolition.
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders.
Also characterized by deterioration from a previous level of functioning (in work wocial relations,self care). Durations: Continuouis illness for at least six months with at least one month of an active phase of psychotic symptoms. Onset is often in adolescence or young adulthood. Medical or substance causing psychosis should be evaluated and diagnosed separately.
Schizophrenia / Catatonic Type
Stupor, negativism, rigidity, mutism
Schizophrenia/ Disorganized Type
Incoherence, flat or grosslyinappropriate affect
Disorganized Type / Paranoid Type
Delusions or frequent auditory hallucinations often persecutory or grandiose
Paranoid Type / Undifferentiated Type
prominent delusions, hallucinations, incoherence or grossly disorganized behavior
Undifferentiated Type / Residual type
absence of prominent psychotic features
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Schizophrenia
Treatment: medicaiton and ego supportive therapy aimed at containing psychotic symptoms and maintaining the person's highest level of functioning.
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Schizophreniform Disorder
Illness of less than six months duration; also a greater likelihood of an acute onset preceded by turmoil / high stress; a range of prognoses and characterized by the absence of blunted or flat affect. Treatment is similar to Schizophrenia
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Schizoaffective Disorder
Psychotic symptoms of Schizophrenia concurrent with the presence of either a Major Depressive Episode, a Manic Episode, or a Mixed Episode. treatment is the same as for Schizophrenia
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Delusional Disorders
Caracterized by the presence of a persistent delusion. Hallucinations are either absent or not prominent.
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Delusional Disorders / Persecutory Type
Delusion that one is being malevolently treated
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Delusional Disorders / Jealous Type
that one's sexual partner is unfathful
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Delusional Disorders / Erotomanic Type
That someone is in love with the delusion person
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Delusional Disorders/ Somatic Type
that one has some physical defect or disease
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Delusional Disorders/ Grandiose Type
that one has a great but unrecognized talent, has made a great discovery, or is a prominent person or close to a prominent person
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Delusional Disorders/ Brief Psychotic Disorder
Usually sudden onset and duration of less than one month.
Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Delusional Disorders/ Shared Psychotic Disorder
A dulusion is held with another person in a close relationship.
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders /Psychopharmacology
Antipsychotic medication with consisten administration and monitoring for response and side effects. e.g. Tardive Dyskinesia-involuntary movement of the mouth tongue, jaw, facialgrimacing
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Individual Psychotherapy
Supportive in nature, little anxiety inducement, contain psychotic symptoms, and focus on realistic goals to maintain highest level of functioning. The goal is to facilitate coping and self acceptance.
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Family Therapy
Provide education and support to family members
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / gROUP Therapy
Practical, supportive, helps develop social skills to begin or sustain relationships.
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Milieu Therapy
Often hospital /nstitutional treatment involving a therapeutic combination of staff, program, social structrue, respite, and expectations of resonable behavior
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Social Network Intervention / Case Management
Help with housing, income, social cntacts, educational and vocational oportunities, medical care, or other resources
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Self help groups
For support and education to the client and family members
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Differential Diagnosis // Paranoid Personality Disorder
There may be paranoid ideation or pathological jealousy, but there are no delusions or hallucinations.
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Differential Diagnosis
Dementia, medial conditions, and substance disorders may also cause psychotic symptoms.
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Differential Diagnosis
Illnesses that may have less severe or transient psychotic features include Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder or Personality Disorder, such as Schizotyal Personality Disorder
Treatment of Schizophrenic and Other Psychotic Disorders / Differential Diagnosis / Course
Varies from chronic to remission within a few months.
Mood Disorders
Characterized by peristent abnormal mood, either, depressed or euphoric. Symptoms may be somatic, affective, cognitive, and or behavioral.
Mood Disorders
Impact is psychological distress and impaired role functioning. Culture may affect presentation; e.g. more somatic symptoms among Asian Clients.
Mood Disorders / Major Depressive Disorder
Vegetative or classic symptoms: significant weight loss or gain insomia or sleeping too much, motor agitation or low energy. Feeling sad or empty, worthless, difficulty concentrating or making decisions. general loss of pleasure and interest. Recurrent thoughts of death or sucide. At least two weeks duration
Mood Disorders / Dysthymic Disorder
Similar symptoms to Major Depressive Disorder, but less severe and more chronic, at least two years.
Mood Disorders / Bipolar I Disorder
Formerly called Manic Depression. One or more Manic Episodes characterized by persisteent abnormally elevated or irritable mood, pressured speech, grandiosity, sleeplessness, and / or excessive pleasurable, high-risk activity.
Mood Disorders / Bipolar II Disorder
Major Depressive Episodes with at least one Hypomanic Episode (Manic symptoms at a less severe intensity)
Mood Disorders / Cyclothymic Disorder
Chronic fluctuating mood with many hypomanic and many depressive symptoms, but not as severe as in either Bipolar I or Bipolar II
Mood Disorders / Treatment of Mood Disorders / Psychopharmacology
Antidepressants for Major Depressive Disorder and Dysthymia.
Mood Disorders / Treatment of Mood Disorders / Psychopharmacology
Antipschotics if Mood Disorder is accompained by psychotic features.
Mood Disorders / Treatment of Mood Disorders / Psychopharmacology
Mood stabilizers if Bipolar I, Bipolar II or Cyclothymia.
Mood Disorders / Treatment of Mood Disorders / Psychopharmacology
Medications require consistent administration and monitoring for effectiveness and side effects.
Mood Disorders / Treatment of Mood Disorders /
Interpersonal / Psychodynamic Therapy
Mood Disorders / Treatment of Mood Disorders / Psychopharmacology
Behavioral Therapy
Cognitive Therapy
Group Psychotherapy
Self help groups