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497 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
abandon
noun.
total lack of inhibition
ex. With her strict parents out of tow, Kelly danced all night with abandon.
abate
verb.
to decrease, to reduce
ex. My hunger abated when I saw how filthy the chef's hands were.
abet
verb.
to aid; to act as an accomplice
ex. While Derwin robbed the bank, Marvin abetted his friend by pulling up the getaway car.
abjure
verb.
to renounce under oath; to abandon forever; to abstain from
ex. After having been devout for most of his life, he suddenly abjured his beliefs, much to his family's disappointment.
abnegate
verb.
to give up; to deny oneself
ex. After his retirement, the former police commissioner found it difficult to abnegate authority.
abortive
adj.
ending w/o results
ex. Her abortive attempt to swim the full five miles left her frustrated.
abrogate
verb.
to annul; to abolish by authoritative action
ex. The president's job is to abrogate any laws that fosters inequality among citizens.
abscond
verb.
to leave quickly in secret
ex. The criminal absconded during the night with all of his mother's money.
abstemious
adj.
done sparingly; consuming in moderation
ex. The spa served no sugar or wheat, but the clients found the retreat so calm that they didn't mind the abstemious rules.
accede
verb.
to express approval, to agree to
ex. Once the mayor heard the reasonable request, she happily acceded to the proposal.
acclivity
noun.
an incline or upward slope, the ascending side of a hill
ex. We were so tired from hiking that by the time we reached the acclivity, it looked more like a mountain than a hill.
accretion
noun.
a growth in size, an increase in amount
ex. The committee's strong fund-raising efforts resulted in an accretion in scholarship money.
acme
noun.
the highest level or degree attainable
ex. Just when he reached the acme of his power, the dictator was overthrown.
actuate
verb.
to put into motion, to activate; to motivate or influence to activity
ex. The leaders rousing speech actuated the crowd into a peaceful protest.
acuity
noun.
sharp vision or perception characterized by the ability to resolve fine detail
ex. With unusual acuity, she was able to determine that the masterpiece was a fake.
acumen
noun.
sharpness of insight, mind, and understanding; shrewd judgment
ex. The investor's financial acumen helped him to select high-yield stocks.
adamant
adj.
stubbornly unyielding
ex. She was adamant about leaving the restaurant after the waiter was rude.
adept
adj.
extremely skilled
ex. She is adept at computing math problems in her head.
adjudicate
verb.
to hear and settle a matter; to act as a judge
ex. The principal adjudicated the disagreement between two students.
adjure
verb.
to appeal to
ex. The criminal adjured to the court for mercy.
admonish
verb.
to caution or warn gently in order to correct something
ex. My mother admonished me about my poor grades.
adroit
adj.
skillful; accomplished; highly competent
ex. The adroit athlete completed even the most difficult obstacle course with ease.
adulation
noun.
excessive flattery or admiration
ex. The adulation she showed her professor seemed insincere; I suspected she really wanted a better grade.
adumbrate
verb
to give a hint or indication of something to come
ex. Her constant complaining about the job adumbrated her intent to leave.
aerie
noun.
a nest built high in the air; an elevated, often secluded, dwelling
ex. Perched high among the trees, the eagle's aerie was filled with eggs.
affected
adj.
phony, artificial
ex. The affected hairdresser spouted French phrases, though she had never been to France.
aggregate
noun.
a collective mass, the sum total
ex. An aggregate of panic-stricken customers mobbed the bank, demanding their life savings.
algorithm
noun.
an established procedure for solving a problem or equation
ex. The accountant uses a series of algorithms to determine the appropriate tax bracket.
alimentary
adj.
pertaining to food, nutrition, or digestion
ex. After a particularly good meal, Sherlock turned to his companion and exclaimed, "I fell quite good, very well fed. It was alimentary my dear Watson."
allay
verb.
to lessen, ease, reduce in intensity
ex. Trying to allay their fears, the nurse sat with them all night.
amity
noun.
friendship, good will
ex. Correspondence over the years contributed to a lasting amity between the women.
amorphous
adj.
having no definite form
ex. The show featured an amorphous creature that was constantly changing shape.
animus
noun.
a feeling of animosity or ill will
ex. Though her teacher had failed her, she displayed no animus toward him.
anodyne
noun.
a source of comfort; a medicine that relieves pain
ex. The sound of classical music is usually just the anodyne I need after a tough day at work.
anomaly
noun.
a deviation from the common rule, something that is difficult to classify
ex. Among the top-ten albums of the year was an anomaly- a compilation of polka classics.
anthropomorphic
adj.
suggesting human characteristics for animals and inanimate things
ex. Many children's stories feature anthropomorphic animals such as talking wolves and pigs.
antiquated
adj.
too old to be fashionable or useful
ex. Next to her coworker's brand-new model, Marisa's computer looked antiquated.
aphorism
noun.
a short statement of a principle
ex. The county doctor was given to such aphorisms as "Still waters run deep."
aplomb
noun.
self-confident assurance; poise
ex. For such a younger dancer, she had great aplomb, making her perfect to play the young princess.
apostate
noun.
one who renounces a religious faith
ex. So that he could divorce his wife, the king scoffed at the church doctrines and declared himself an apostate.
apposite
adj.
strikingly appropriate or well adapted
ex. The lawyer presented an apposite argument upon cross-examining the star witness.
apprise
verb.
to give notice to, inform
ex. "Thanks for apprising me that the test time has been changed," said Emanuel.
appropriate
verb.
to assign to a particular purpose, allocate
ex. The fund's manager appropriated funds for the clean-up effort.
arable
adj.
suitable for cultivation
ex. The overpopulated country desperately needed more arable land.
arcane
adj.
secret, obscure; known only to few
ex. The arcane rituals of the sect were passed down through many generations.
archipelago
noun.
a large group of islands.
ex. Between villages in the Stockholm archipelago, boat taxis are the only form of transportation.
arrears
noun.
unpaid, overdue debts and bills; neglected obligations
ex. After the expensive lawsuit, Dominic's accounts were in arrears.
arrogate
verb.
to claim w/o justification; to claim for oneself w/o right
ex. Lynn watched in astonishment as her boss arrogated the credit for her brilliant work on the project.
askance
adverb.
with disapproval; with a skeptical sideways glance
ex. She looked askance at her son's failing report card as he mumbled that he had done all the schoolwork.
assent
verb.
to agree, as to a proposal
ex. After careful deliberation, the CEO assented to the proposed merger.
atavistic
adj.
characteristic of a former era, ancient
ex. After spending three weeks on a desert island, Roger became a survivalist with atavistic skills that helped him endure.
autocrat
noun.
a dictator
ex. Mussolini has been described as an autocrat who tolerated no opposition.
aver
verb.
to declare to be true, to affirm
ex. "Yes, he was wearing a mask," the witness averred.
avuncular
adj.
like an uncle in behavior, especially in kindness and warmth
ex. The coach's avuncular style made him well-liked.
awry
adverb.
crooked, askew, amiss
ex. Something must have gone awry in the computer system because some of my files are missing.
balk
verb.
to stop short and refuse to go on
ex. When the horse balked at jumping over the high fence, the rider was thrown off.
ballast
noun.
a structure that helps to stabilize or steady
ex. Communication and honesty are the true ballasts of a good relationship.
beatific
adj.
displaying calmness and joy, relating to a state of celestial happiness
ex. After spending three months in India, she had a beatific peace about her.
becalm
verb.
to stop the progress of, to soothe
ex. The warm air becalmed the choppy waves.
becloud
verb.
to make less visible, to obscure, or blur
ex. Her ambivalence about the long commute beclouded her enthusiasm about the job.
bedraggle
adj.
soiled, wet and limp; dilapidated
beget
verb.
to produce, especially as an effect or outgrowth; to bring about
behemoth
noun.
something of monstrous size or power; huge creature
beneficent
adj.
pertaining to an act of kindness
berate
verb.
to scold harshly
bilious
adj.
ill-tempered, sickly, ailing
blasphemous
adj.
cursing, profane; extremely irreverent
blatant
adj.
completely obvious and conspicuous, especially in an offensive, crass manner
blithely
adverb.
merrily, lightheartedly cheerful; w/o appropriate thought
bombastic
adj.
high-sounding but meaningless; ostentatiously lofty in style
bovine
adj.
relating to cows; having qualities characteristic of a cow, such as sluggishness or dullness
braggart
noun.
a person who brags or boasts in a loud and empty manner
broach
verb.
to mention or suggest for the first time
bucolic
adj.
pastoral, rural
burnish
verb.
to polish; to make smooth and bright.
bursar
noun.
a treasurer or keeper of funds
cache
noun.
a hiding place; stockpile
cacophony
noun.
a jarring, unpleasant noise
calumny
noun.
a false and malicious accusation; misrepresentation
cantankerous
adj.
having a difficult, uncooperative, or stubborn disposition
captious
adj.
marked by the tendency to point out trivial faults; intended to confuse in an argument
cataclysmic
adj.
severely destructive
catalyst
noun.
something that provokes or speeds up significant change, especially w/o being affected by the consequences
caucus
noun.
a closed committee within a political party; a private committee meeting
caustic
adj.
biting, sarcastic
cede
verb.
to surrender possession of something
celerity
noun.
speed, haste
censorious
adj.
critical; tending to blame and condemn
certitude
noun.
assurance, freedom from doubt
cessation
noun.
a temporary or complete halt
chary
adj.
watchful, cautious; extremely shy
chimerical
adj.
fanciful; imaginary, impossible
circuitous
adj.
indirect, roundabout
circumvent
verb.
to go around, avoid
cloying
adj.
sickly sweet; excessive
coagulate
verb.
to clot; to cause to thicken
cogent
adj.
logically forceful; compelling, convincing
colloquial
adj.
characteristic of informal speech
commute
verb.
to change a penalty to a less severe one
complacent
adj.
self-satisfied, smug
compliant
adj.
submissive, yielding
concomitant
adj.
existing concurrently
concord
noun.
agreement
condole
verb.
to grieve; to express sympathy
conflagration
noun.
big, destructive fire
confluence
noun.
the act of two things flowing together; the junction or meeting place where two things meet
consanguineous
adj.
having the same lineage or ancestry; related by blood
consternation
noun.
an intense state of fear or dismay
constituent
noun.
component, part; citizen, voter
constraint
noun.
something that restricts or confines within prescribed bounds
contemptuous
adj.
scornful; expressing contempt
contentious
adj.
quarrelsome, disagreeable, belligerent
contiguous
adj.
sharing a boundary; neighboring
continence
noun.
self-control, self-restraint
convalesce
verb.
to recover gradually from an illness
convergence
noun.
the state of separate elements joining or coming together
coquette
noun.
a flirtatious woman
coterie
noun.
an intimate group of persons with a similar purpose
countervail
verb.
to act or react with equal force
covert
adj.
secretive, not openly shown
cull
verb.
to select, weed out
cumulative
adj.
increasing, collective
curt
adj.
abrupt, shirt with words
dearth
noun.
a lack, scarcity, insufficiency
debacle
noun.
a sudden, disastrous collapse or defeat; a total, ridiculous failure
declaim
verb.
to speak loudly and vehemently
defamatory
adj.
injurious to the reputation
demagogue
noun.
a leader, rabble-rouser, usually appealing to emotion or prejudice
denizen
noun.
an inhabitant, a resident
deride
verb.
to laugh at contemptuously, to make fun of
diffuse
verb.
to spread out widely, to scatter freely, to disseminate
digress
verb.
to turn aside, especially from the main point; to stray from the subject
dilapidated
adj.
in disrepair, run down
diluvial
adj.
pertaining to a flood
discomfit
verb.
to disconcert, to make one lose one's composure
discrete
adj.
individually distinct, separate
disingenuous
adj.
giving a false appearance of simple frankness; misleading
disinterested
adj.
fair-minded, unbiased
dispassionate
adj.
unaffected by bias or strong emotions; not personally or emotionally involved in something
dissident
adj.
disagreeing with an established religious or political system
doctrinaire
adj.
rigidly devoted to theories w/o regard for practicality; dogmatic
dogged
adj.
stubbornly persevering
doleful
adj.
sad, mournful
dour
adj.
sullen and gloomy; stern and severe
effluvia
noun.
waste; odorous fumes given off by waste
elegy
noun.
a mournful poem, usually about the dead
elude
verb.
to avoid cleverly, to escape the perception of
emollient
adj.
soothing, especially to the skin
emulate
verb.
to strive to equal or excel, to imitate
encumber
verb.
to weigh down, to burden
enjoin
verb.
to direct or impose with urgent appeal, to order with emphasis; to forbid
epochal
adj.
momentous, highly significant
eponymous
adj.
giving one's name to a place, book, restaurant
equivocate
verb.
to avoid committing oneself in what one says, to be deliberately unclear
ersatz
adj.
being an artificial and inferior substitute or imitation
eschew
verb.
to shun; to avoid (as something wrong or distasteful)
espouse
verb.
to take up and support as a cause; to many
espy
verb.
to catch sight of, glimpse
euphemism
noun.
an inoffensive and agreeable expression that is submitted for one that is considered offensive
euthanasia
noun.
the practice of ending the life of terminally ill individuals; assisted suicide
excoriate
verb.
to censure scathingly; to express strong disapproval of
exponent
noun.
one who champions or advocates
expound
verb.
to explain or describe in detail
expunge
verb.
to erase, eliminate completely
extirpate
verb.
to root out, eradicate, literally or figuratively; to destroy wholly
extrapolation
noun.
using known data and information to determine what will happen in the future; prediction
extrinsic
adj.
external, unessential; originating form the outside
extrude
verb.
to form or shape something by pushing it out, to force out, especially through a small opening
facetious
adj.
witty, humorous
facile
adj.
easily accomplished; seeming to lack sincerity or depth; arrived at w/o due effort
fallacious
adj.
tending to deceive or mislead; based on a fallacy
febrile
adj.
feverish, marked by intense emotion or activity
feckless
adj.
ineffective, worthless
feign
verb.
to pretend, to give a false appearance of
feral
adj.
suggestive of a wild beast, not domesticated
fictive
adj.
fictional, relating to imaginative creation
filibuster
verb.
to use obstructionist tactics, especially prolonged speech making, in order to delay something
fitful
adj.
intermittent, lacking steadiness; characterized by irregular bursts of inactivity
flippant
adj.
marked by disrespectful lightheartedness or casualness
flout
verb.
to scorn, to disregard with contempt
fodder
noun.
raw material, as for artistic creation, readily abundant ideas or images
forego
verb.
to precede, to go ahead of
forgo
verb.
to do w/o, to abstain from
formidable
adj.
fearsome, daunting; tending to inspire awe or wonder
fortitude
noun.
strength of that allows one to encounter adversity with courage
fortuitous
adj,
by chance, especially by favorable chance
frenetic
adj.
frantic, frenzied
fulsome
adj.
abundant; flattering in an insincere way
furlough
noun.
a leave of absence, especially granted to a soldier or a prisoner
furtive
adj.
sly, with hidden motives
galvanize
verb.
to shock; to arouse awareness
gamely
adj.
spiritedly, bravely
gauche
adverb.
lacking social refinement
grandiloquence
noun.
pompous talk; fancy but meaningless language
gregarious
adj.
outgoing, sociable
grotto
noun.
a small cave
harangue
verb.
to give a long speech
hedonist
noun.
one who pursues pleasure as a goal
hegemony
noun.
the domination of one state or group over its allies
heretical
adj.
departing from accepted beliefs or standards, oppositional
hiatus
noun.
a gap or interruption in space, time, or continuity
histrionics
noun.
deliberate display of emotion for effect; exaggerated behavior calculated for effect
hubris
noun.
excessive pride or self-confidence
husband
verb.
to manage economically; to use sparingly
hypocrite
noun.
one who puts on a false appearance of virtue; one who criticizes a flaw he in fact possesses
ignoble
adj.
having low moral standards, not noble in character; mean
illusory
adj.
producing illusion, deceptive
imbibe
verb.
to receive into the mind and take in, absorb
impassive
adj.
absent of any external sign of emotion, expressionless
imperious
adj.
commanding, domineering; urgent
imperturbable
adj.
unshakably calm and steady
implacable
adj.
inflexible; not capable of being changed or pacified
importunate
adj.
troublesomely urgent; extremely persistent in request or demand
imprecation
noun.
a curse
impudent
adj.
marked by cocky boldness or disregard for others
impugn
verb.
to call into question; to attack verbally
impute
verb.
to lay the responsibility or blame for, often unjust;y
incandescent
adj.
shining brightly
incarnadine
adj.
red, especially blood red
inchoate
adj.
being only partly in existence; imperfectly formed
incipient
adj.
beginning to exist or appear; in an initial stage
incorrigible
adj.
incapable of being corrected or amended; difficult to control or manage
incredulous
adj.
unwilling to accept what is true, skeptical
indomitable
adj.
incapable of being conquered
ingratiate
verb.
to gain favor with another by deliberate effort, to seek to please somebody so as to gain an advantage
inherent
adj.
involving the essential character of something, built-in, inborn
inquest
noun.
an investigation, an inquiry
insensate
adj.
lacking sensibility and understanding, foolish
insolent
adj.
insultingly arrogant, overbearing
insular
adj.
characteristic of an isolated people, especially having a narrow viewpoint
insuperable
adj.
incapable of being surmounted or overcome
inter
verb.
to bury
interlocutor
noun.
one who takes part in a conversation
internecine
adj.
mutually destructive; equally devastating to both sides
interregnum
noun.
a temporary halting of the usual operations of a government or control
intimation
noun.
a subtle and indirect hint
intractable
adj.
not easily managed or manipulated
intransigent
adj.
uncompromising, refusing to abandon an extreme position
intrepid
adj.
fearless, resolutely courageous
inundate
verb.
to cover with a flood; to overwhelm as if with a flood
inveterate
adj.
firmly established, especially with respect to a habit or attitude
irascible
adj.
easily angered, hot-tempered
ironic
adj.
poignantly contrary or incongruous to what was expected
irreverent
adj.
disrespectful in a gentle or humorous way
itinerant
adj.
wandering from place to place; unsettled
jettison
verb.
to discard, to get rid of as unnecessary or encumbering
jocular
adj.
playful, humorous
junta
noun.
a small governing body, especially after a revolutionary seizure of power
kismet
noun.
destiny, fate
lampoon
verb.
to ridicule with satire
largess
noun.
generous giving (as of money) to others who may seem inferior
laudable
adj.
deserving of praise
lax
adj.
not rigid, loose; negligent
levity
noun.
an inappropriate lack of seriousness, overly casual
lexicon
noun.
a dictionary; a stock of terms pertaining to a particular subject or vocabulary
libertarian
noun.
one who advocates individual rights and free will
libertine
noun.
a free thinker, usually used disparagingly; one w/o moral restraint
licentious
adj.
immoral; unrestrained by society
lilliputian
adj.
very small
limber
adj.
flexible, capable of being shaped
lithe
adj.
moving and bending with ease; marked by effortless grace
loquacious
adj.
talkative
macabre
adj.
having death as a subject; dwelling on the gruesome
macrocosm
noun.
the whole universe; a large-scale reflection of a part of the greater world
malaise
noun.
a feeling of unease or depression
malapropism
noun.
the accidental, often comical, use of a word which resembles the one intended, but has a different, often contradictory meaning
malediction
noun.
a curse, a wish of evil upon another
malevolent
adj.
exhibiting ill will; wishing harm to others
malfeasance
noun.
wrongdoing or misconduct, especially by a public official
malleable
adj.
easily influenced or shaped, capable of being altered by outside forces
mannered
adj.
artificial or stilted in character
maverick
noun.
an independent individual who does not go along with a group
mawkish
adj.
sickeningly sentimental
megalomania
noun.
obsession with great or grandiose performance
mellifluous
adj.
having a smooth, rich flow
microcosm
noun.
a small scale representation of a larger system
milieu
noun.
the physical or social setting in which something occurs or develops, environment
misanthrope
noun.
a person who hates or distrusts mankind
misnomer
noun.
an error in naming a person or place
missive
noun.
a written note or letter
mitigate
verb.
to make less severe, make milder
modicum
noun.
a small portion, limited quantity
mollify
verb.
to soothe in temper or disposition
mordant
adj.
biting and caustic in manner and style
mores
noun.
fixed customs or manners; moral attitudes
morose
adj.
gloomy, sullen
mote
noun.
a small particle, speck
mutability
noun.
the quality of being capable of change, in form or character; susceptibility of change
myopic
adj.
lacking foresight, having a narrow view or long-range perspective
nebulous
adj.
vague, undefined
necromancy
noun.
the practice of communicating with the dead in order to predict the future
nefarious
adj.
intensely wicked or vicious
neonate
noun.
a newborn child
nihilism
noun.
the belief that traditional values and beliefs are unfounded and that existence is useless; the belief that conditions in the social organization are so bad as to make destruction desirable
nomenclature
noun.
a system of scientific names
non sequitur
noun.
a statement that does not follow logically from anything previously said
novel
adj.
new and not resembling anything formerly known
obdurate
adj.
stubbornly persistent, resistant to persuasion
obfuscate
verb.
to confuse, make obscure
obstinate
adj.
unreasonably persistent
olfactory
adj.
relating to the sense of smell
oligarchy
noun.
a government in which a small group exercises supreme control
onus
noun.
a burden, an obligation
opine
verb.
to express an opinion
opportunist
noun.
one who takes advantage of any opportunity to achieve an end, with little regard for principles
opprobrious
adj.
disgraceful, shameful
ornery
adj.
having an irritable disposition, cantankerous
oscillate
verb.
to swing back and forth like a pendulum; to vary between opposing beliefs or feelings
ossify
verb.
to change into bone; to become hardened or set in a rigidly conventional pattern
ostracize
verb.
to exclude from a group by common consent
oust
verb.
to remove from position by force; eject
paean
noun.
a tribute, a song or expression of praise
palatial
adj.
relating to a palace; magnificent
palimpsest
noun.
an object or place having diverse layers or aspects beneath the surface
palpable
adj.
capable of being touched or felt; easily perceived
paltry
adj.
pitifully small or worthless
panache
noun.
flamboyance or dash in style and action
pandemic
adj.
occurring over a wide geographic area and affecting a large portion of the population
panegyric
noun.
elaborate praise; formal hymn of praise
paradigm
noun.
an outstandingly clear or typical example
paragon
noun.
a model of excellence or perfection
paramount
adj.
supreme, of chief importance
pare
verb.
to trim off excess, reduce
pariah
noun.
an outcast
patent
adj.
obvious, evident
pathogenic
adj.
causing disease
patrician
adj.
aristocratic
patronize
verb.
to act as patron of, to adopt an air of condescension toward; to buy from
peculate
verb.
to embezzle
pecuniary
adj.
relating to money
pellucid
adj.
transparently clear in style or meaning, easy to understand
penchant
noun.
an inclination, a definite liking
penitent
adj.
expressing sorrow for sins or offenses, repentant
penury
noun.
an oppressive lack of resources (as money), severe poverty
peregrinate
verb.
to travel on foot
phalanx
noun.
a compact or close-knit body of people, animals, or things
philistine
noun.
a person who is guided by materialism an is disdainful of intellectual or artistic values
philology
noun.
the study of ancient texts and languages
phlegmatic
adj.
having a sluggish, unemotional temperament
pique
verb.
to arouse anger or resentment in; provoke
plaintive
adj.
expressive of suffering or woe, melancholy
platitude
noun.
overused and trite remark
plebeian
adj.
crude or coarse; characteristic of commoners
plucky
adj.
courageous; spunky
politic
adj.
shrewd and crafty in managing or dealing with things
polyglot
noun.
a speaker of many languages
pore
verb.
to read studiously or attentively
portentous
adj.
foreshadowing, ominous; eliciting amazement and wonder
posit
verb.
to assume as real or conceded; propose as an explanation
potable
adj.
suitable for drinking
potentate
noun.
a ruler; one who wields great power
precarious
adj.
lacking in security or stability; dependent on chance or uncertain conditions
precipitous
adj.
steep
presage
noun.
something that foreshadows; a feeling of what will happen in the future
prestidigitation
noun.
a cleverly executed trick or deception; sleight of hand
preternatural
adj.
existing outside of nature; extraordinary; supernatural
primeval
adj.
ancient, primitive
prodigal
adj.
recklessly extravagant, wasteful
proffer
verb.
to offer for acceptance
progenitor
noun.
an ancestor in the direct line, forefather; founder
proliferate
verb.
to grow by rapid production of new parts; increase in number
promulgate
verb.
to make known by open declaration, proclaim
propensity
noun.
a natural inclination or preference
prosaic
adj.
relating to prose; dull, ordinary
proscribe
verb.
to condemn or forbid as harmful or unlawful
prostrate
adj.
lying face downward in adoration or submission
provincial
adj.
limited in outlook, narrow, unsophisticated
proxy
noun.
a person authorized to act for someone else
pseudonym
noun.
a fictitious name, used particularly by writers to conceal identity
pugilism
noun.
boxing
puissant
adj.
powerful
punctilious
adj.
concerned with precise details about codes or conventions
pundit
noun.
one who gives opinions in an authoritative manner
purloin
verb.
to steal
purport
verb.
to profess, suppose, claim
rancor
noun.
bitter hatred
rankle
verb.
to cause anger and irritation
rapacious
adj.
taking by force; driven by greed
rapt
adj.
deeply absorbed
rarefy
verb.
to make rare, thin, or less dense
raze
verb.
to tear down, demolish
reactionary
adj.
marked by extreme conservatism, especially in politics
recapitulate
verb.
to review by a brief summary
recidivism
noun.
a tendency to relapse into a previous behavior, especially criminal behavior
refract
verb.
to deflect sound or light
refute
verb.
to contradict, discredit
relegate
verb.
to send into exile, banish; assign
remission
noun.
a lessening of intensity or degree
remuneration
noun.
payment for goods or services or to recompense for losses
replete
adj.
abundantly supplied, complete
repose
noun.
relaxation, leisure
reprehensible
adj.
blameworthy, disreputable
reprove
verb.
to criticize or correct, usually in a gentle manner
requite
verb.
to return or repay
rescind
verb.
to repeal, cancel
resilient
adj.
able to recover quickly after illness or bad luck; able to bounce back to shape
resolute
adj.
marked by firm determination
resplendent
adj.
splendid, brilliant
revile
verb.
to criticize with harsh language, verbally abuse
rhetoric
noun.
the art of speaking or writing effectively; skill in the effective use of speech
rife
adj.
abundant prevalent especially to an increasing degree; filled with
rostrum
noun.
an elevated platform for public speaking
saccharine
adj.
excessively sweet or sentimental
sacrilegious
adj.
impious, irreverent toward what is held to be sacred or holy
salient
adj.
prominent, of notable significance
sanctimonious
adj.
hypocritically devout; acting morally superior to another
satiate
verb.
to satisfy (as a need or desire) fully or to excess
saturnine
adj.
cold and steady in mood, gloomy; slow to act
savant
noun.
a person of learning; especially one w/ knowledge in a special field
scrupulous
adj.
acting in strict regard for what is considered proper; punctiliously exact
seamy
adj.
morally degraded, unpleasant
secular
adj.
not specifically pertaining to religion, relating to the world
sedition
noun.
behavior that promotes rebellion or civil disorder against the state
seminal
adj.
influential in an original way, providing a basis for further development; creative
sequester
verb.
to set apart, seclude
seraphic
adj.
angelic, sweet
simian
adj.
apelike; relating to apes
sinecure
noun.
a well-paying job or office that requires little or no work
sobriquet
noun.
a nickname
sojourn
noun.
a temporary stay, visit
solicitous
adj.
anxious, concerned; full of desire, eager
sophomoric
adj.
exhibiting great immaturity and lack of judgment
spartan
adj.
highly self-disciplined; frugal, austere
specious
adj.
having the ring of truth but actually being untrue; deceptively attractive
sportive
adj.
frolicsome, playful
squalid
adj.
filthy and degraded as the result of neglect or poverty
stalwart
adj.
marked by outstanding strength and vigor of mind, body, or spirit
stasis
noun.
a state of static balance or equilibrium; stagnation
stint
verb.
to be sparing or frugal; to restrict with respect to a share or allowance
stipulate
verb.
to specify as a condition or requirement of an agreement or offer
stratify
verb.
to arrange or divide into layers
strident
adj.
loud, harsh, unpleasantly noisy
stringent
adj.
imposing severe, rigorous standards
stymie
verb.
to block or thwart
subterranean
adj.
hidden, secret; underground
sully
verb.
to tarnish, taint
superfluous
adj.
extra, more than necessary
supersede
verb.
to cause to be set aside; to force out of use as inferior, replace
supplant
verb.
to replace (another) by force, to take the place of
surmount
verb.
to conquer, overcome
sybarite
noun.
a person devoted to pleasure and luxury
tactile
adj.
producing a sensation of touch
tantamount
adj.
equal in value or effect
tautological
adj.
having to do with needless repetition, redundancy
tawdry
adj.
gaudy, cheap, showy
temerity
noun.
unreasonable or foolhardy disregard for danger, recklessness
tempestuous
adj.
stormy, turbulent
temporal
adj.
having to do with time
tenacious
adj.
tending to persist or cling; persistent in adhering to something valued or habitual
tenet
noun.
a principle, belief, or doctrine accepted by members of a group
tenuous
adj.
having little substance or strength; flimsy, weak
terse
adj.
concise, brief, free of extra words
thwart
verb.
to block or prevent from happening; frustrate, defeat the hopes or aspirations of
titular
adj.
existing in title only; having a title w/o the functions or responsibilities
toady
noun.
one who flatters in the hope of gaining favors
tortuous
adj.
having many twists and turns; highly complex
tout
verb.
to praise or publicize loudly or extravagantly
trajectory
noun.
the path followed by a moving object. whether through space or otherwise; flight
transient
adj.
passing with time, temporary, short-lived
transitory
adj.
short-lived, existing only briefly
tremulous
adj.
trembling, timid; easily shaken
trounce
verb.
to beat severely, defeat
truculent
adj.
disposed to fight, belligerent
turgid
adj.
swollen as from a fluid, bloated
tutelage
noun.
guardianship, guidance
uncanny
adj.
so keen and perceptive as to seem supernatural, peculiarly unsettling
unconscionable
adj.
unscrupulous; shockingly unfair or unjust
untoward
adj.
difficult to handle or work with
usury
noun.
the practice of lending money at exorbitant rates
variegated
adj.
varied; marked with different colors
vehemently
adverb.
marked by extreme intensity of emotions or convictions
veracity
noun.
accuracy, truth
verbose
adj.
wordy
veritable
adj.
being w/o question, often used figuratively
vernacular
noun.
everyday language used by ordinary people; specialized language of a profession
vernal
adj.
related to spring; fresh
vicariously
adverb.
felt or undergone as if one were taking part in the experience or feelings of another
vilify
verb.
to slander, defame
vim
noun.
vitality and energy
vindicate
verb.
to clear of blame; support a claim
virulent
adj.
extremely poisonous; malignant; hateful
visceral
adj.
instinctive, not intellectual; deep, emotional
vituperate
verb.
to abuse verbally, berate
vociferous
adj.
loud, noisy
volley
noun.
a flight of missiles; round of gunshots
voluble
adj.
talkative, speaking easily, glib
wan
adj.
sickly pale
wanton
adj.
undisciplined, unrestrained; reckless
wax
verb.
to increase gradually; to begin to be
wield
verb.
to exercise authority or influence effectively
wily
adj.
clever; deceptive
winsome
adj.
charming, happily engaging
worst
verb.
to gain the advantage over; to defeat
wry
adj.
bent or twisted in shape or condition; dryly humorous
yen
noun.
a strong desire, craving
zenith
noun.
the point of culmination; peak
zephyr
noun.
a gentle breeze; something airy or unsubstantial