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78 Cards in this Set

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accolate
N. award of merit
In the world of public relations, a "Clio" is the highest accolate an advertising campaign can receive.
affix
V. add on; fasten; attach
First the registrar had to affix her signature to the license; then she had to affix her official seal.
aloft
ADV. upward
The salor climbed aloft into the rigging.
altruistic
ADJ. unselfishly generous; concerned for others
The star received no fee for appearing at the benefit; it was purely altruistic act.
ancillary
ADJ. serving as an aid or accessory; auxiliary
In an ancillary capacity Doctor Watson was helpful.
anticlimax
N. letdown in thought or emotion
After the fine performance in the first act, the rest of the play was an anticlimax.
antipathy
N. aversion; dislike
Tom's extreme antipathy for disputes keeps him from getting into arguments with his temperamental wife.
aplomb
N. poise; assurance
Gwen's aplomb in handling potentially embarrassing moments was legendary around the office.
apocryphal
ADJ. untrue; made up
To impress his friends, Tom invented apocryphal tales of his adventures in the big city.
append
V. attach
I shall append this chart to my report.
appropriate
V. acquire; take possession of for one's own use; set aside for a special purpose
The ranchers appropriated lands that had originally been intended for Indian use.
aria
N. operatic solo
At her Metropolitan Opera audition, Marian Anderson san an aria from the opera Norma.
ascendancy
N. controlling influence
President Marcos failed to maintain his ascendancy over the Philippines.
assail
V. assualt
He was assailed with questions after his lecture.
assuage
V. ease or lessen (pain)
Jilted by Jane, Dick tried to assuage his heartache by indulging in ice cream.
astute
ADJ. wise; shrewd; keen
As tutor, she made astute observations about how to take multiple-choice tests.
attribute
N. essential quality
His outstanding attribute was his kindness.
avarice
N. greediness for wealth
King Midas is a perfect example of avarice, for he was so greedy that he wished everthing he touched would turn to gold.
avert
V. prevent; turn aside
"Watch out!" she cried, hoping to avert an accident.
babble
V. chatter idly
The little girl babbled about her dolls and pets.
balk
V. foil or thwart; stop short; refuse to go on
When the warden learned that several inmates were planning to escape, he took steps to balk their attempt.
bane
N. cause of ruin; curse
Lucy's little brother was the bane of her existence.
begrudge
V. resent
I begrudge every minute I have to sepnd attending meetings; they're a complete waste of time.
beguile
V. mislead or delude; cheat; pass time
With flattery and big talk of easy money, the con men beguiled Kyle into betting his allowance on the shell game.
belie
V. contradict; give a false impression of
His coarse, hard-bitten exterior belied his underlying sensitivity.
bland
ADJ. soothing; mild; dull
Unless you want your stomach lining to be eaten away, stick to a bland diet.
blandishment
N. flattery
Despite the salesperson's blahdishments, the customer did not buy the outfit.
blare
N. loud, harsh roar; screech
I don't know which is worse: the steady blare of a teenager's boom box deafening your ears or a sudden blaze of flashbulbs dazzling your eyes.
blithe
ADJ. gay, joyous; carefree
Without a care in the world, Beth went her blithe, light-hearted way.
boisterous
ADJ. rough and noisy; rowdy; stormy
The unruly crowd of demonstrators became even more boisterous when the mayor tried to quiet them.
boon
N. blessing; benefit
The recent rains that filled our empty reservoirs were a bbon to the whole community.
bountiful
ADJ. abundant; graciously generous
THanks to the good harvest, we had a bountiful supply of food and we could be as bountiful as we liked in distributing food to the needy.
brandish
V. wave around; flourish
Alarmed, Doctor Watson widly brandished his gun until Holmes told him to put the thing away before he shot himself.
brine
N. salt water; seawater
If you pack a peck of peppers in brine, waht do you get?
brusque
ADJ. blunt; abrupt
Jill was offended by Jack's brusque reply; he had no right to be so impatient with her.
bungle
V. mismanage; blunder
Don't botch this assignment; if you bungle the job, you're fired!
burgeon
V. bloom; develop rapidly; flourish
From its start as a small Seattle coffeehouse, Starbucks seemed to burgeon almost overnight into a major national chain.
bustle
V. move about energetically; teem
David and the children bustled about hte house getting in each other's way as they tried to pack for the camping trip.
buttress
V. support or prop up
The government is considering price supports to buttress the declining economy.
camaraderie
N. good-fellowship
What Giinger loved best about her job was the sense of camaraderie she and her co-workers shared.
candor
N. frankness; open honesty
Jack can carry candor too far: when he told Jill his honest opinion of her, she nearly slapped his face.
canine
ADJ. related to dogs; dog-like
Some days the canine population of Berkeley seems almost to outnumber the human population.
cant
N. insincere, hypocritical speech
Shocked by news of the minister's extramarital lovve affairs, the worshippers dismissed his talk about the sacredness of marriage as mere cant.
capricious
ADJ. unpredictable; fickle
The storm was capricious: it changed course constantly.
caricature
N. distortion; burlesque
The caricatures he drew always emphasized a personal weakness of the people he burlesqued.
castigation
V. punishment, severe criticism
Sensitive to even mild criticism, Virginia Woolf could not bear the castigation that she met in certain reviews.
catacomb
N. subterranean cemetery; underground passway
Londoners refer to their catacomb-like subway system as the Underground.
censure
V. blame, criticize
Though I don't blame Tony for leaving Tina, I do censure him for failing to pay child support.
cessation
N. stopping
The airline workers threatened a cessation of all work if management fialed to meet their demands.
chaff
N. left overs; worthless
When you separate the wheat from the chaff, be sure you throw out the chaff.
chagrin
N. vexation caused by humiliation; disappointment
Embarrassed by his parents' shabby appearance, he felt their visit to his school would bring him nothing but chargrin.
charlatan
N. quack; pretender to knowledge
WHen they realized that Wizard didn't know how to get them back to Kansas, Dorothy and her friends were sure they'd been duped by his charlatan.
chary
ADJ. cautious; sparing or restrained about giving
A prudent, thrifty, New Englander, DeWitt was as chary of paying people unnecessary compliments.
chasm
N. opening; abyss
They could not see the bottom of the chasm.
chastise
V. punish physically; scold verbally
"Spare the rod and spoil the child," Miss Watson said, grabbing her birch wand and preceeding to chastise poor Huck thoroughly.
chauvinist
N. blindly devoted patriot
Chauvinists cannot recognize any faults in their country, no matter how flagrant they may be.
chicanery
N. trickery; deception
Those sneaky lawyers misrepresented what occurred, made up all sorts of implausible alternative scenarios to confuse the jurors, andi n general depended on chicanery to win the case.
circumscribe
V. limit; confine
Although I do not wish to circumscribe your activities, I must insist that you complete this assignment before you start anything else.
clairvoyant
ADJ., N. having foresight; fortune-teller
Cassandra's clairvoyant warning was not heeded by the Trojans.
clemency
N. disposition to be lenient; mildness, as of the weather
THe lawyer was pleased when the case was sent to Judge Smith's chambers because Smith was noted for her clemency toward first offenders.
clique
N. small exclusive group
Fitzgerald wished that he belonged to the clique of popular athletes and big men on campus who seemed to run Princeton's social life.
cogitate
V. think over
Cogitate on this problem; the solution will come.
collusion
N. conspiring in a fraudulent scheme
The swindlers were found guilty of collusion.
comely
ADJ. attractive; agreeable
I would rather have a poor but comely wife than a rich and homely one.
commiserate
V. feel or express pity or sympathy for
Her friends commiserated with the widow.
complacent
ADJ. self-satisfied; smug
Feeling complacent about his latest victories, he looked smugly at the row of trophies on his mantelpiece.
composure
N. mental calmness
Even the latest work crisis failed to shake her composure.
concerted
ADJ. mutually agreed on; done together
All the Girl Scouts made a concerted effort to raise funds for their annual outing.
concoct
V. prepare by combining; make up in concert
How did the inventive chef ever concoct such a strange dish?
condescend
V. act conscious of descending to a lower level
Though Jill was a star softball player in college, she condescended to her teammates when she played a pickup game at the local park.
conflagration
N. great fire
In the conflagration that followed the 1906 earthquake, much of San Francisco burned to the ground.
connotation
N. suggested or implied meaning of an expression
Foreigners frequently are unaware of the connotations of the words they use.
consequence
N. self-importance; pomposity
Convinced of his own importance, the actor struttled about hte dressing room with air of consequence.
console
V. lessen sadness or disappointment; give comfort
When her father died, Marius did his best to console Cosette.
conspicuous
ADJ. easily seen; noticeable
Janet was conspicuous both for her red hair and for her height.
constituent
N. part working for a whole
THe congressman received hundreds of letters from angry constituents after the Equal Rights Amendment failed to pass.
contagion
N. infection
Fearing contagion, the health authorities took reat steps to prevent the spread of the disease.
contention
N. claim; thesis
It is our contention that, if you follow our tactics, you will boost your score on the PSAT.