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25 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
admission
admission (noun):

Power or permission to enter; a fact, point, or statement admitted.

The politician's admission that she had embezzled funds from the city's coffers put an end to her hopes for reelection.
agressor
aggressor (noun):

The person who first attacks; an assailant.

The commissioner of the hockey league vowed to review the videotape of the bench clearing brawl in order to determine which team had been the aggressor.
allege
allege (Verb):

To declare; to affirm; to assert.

Whether or not all the claims alleged by the prosecutor are true, the defendant's reputation will undeniably suffer as a result of the trial.
amorous
amorous (adj):

Inclined to love; loving; affectionate.

The man's amorous advances towards his co-workers were not appreciated by the women who worked in the office.
analogous
analogous (adj):

Corresponding to or bearing some resemblance to something else.
atrocity
atrocity (noun):

Enormous wickedness; extreme heinousness or cruelty.
audacious
audacious (adj):

Daring, brave. Insolent, rude, brash.
audible
audible (adj):

Capable of being heard; loud enough to be heard.

The teachers remarks were barely audible amid the buzz of the noisy students.
cavalcade
cavalcade (noun):

A procession of persons on horseback.

The king's army was relieved to know that a cavalcade of reinforcements was riding in to help.
cessation
cessation (noun):

A ceasing or discontinuance, as of action, whether temporary or final.
combustible
combustible (adj):

Capable of taking fire and burning; apt to catch fire; inflammable.

To their horror, the girls discovered just how combustible a mattress can be when the candle tipped over on the bed and started the fire.
comprise
comprise (verb):

To make up, to compose.

As a wedding gift, they were given a tea set that comprised eight cups, eight saucers, a creamer and a sugar bowl.
cosmetic
cosmetic (adj):

Affecting only the surface; skin deep.

The editor had no substantive changes to make to the piece; she simply made some cosmetic adjustments to make the article more flashy.
cultivate
cultivate (Verb):

Refine, civilize or improve.

His temper tantrum was so violent that it destroyed his carefully cultivated reputation as an imperturbable, gentle soul.
dabble
dabble (verb):

To work in slight or superficial manner; to do in a small way.
deference
deference (noun):

An attitude of yielding one's opinion to another's wishes.

Out of deference to the Queen, the visitor praised the fish soup, even though he did not actually like it.
defoliate
defoliate (verb):

To lose leaves.

October is the prettiest time of year in New England; the trees have not yet begun to defoliate and their leaves are a range of vibrant reds, yellows and oranges.
deft
deft (adj):

Clever; handy; dexterous.
delusion
delusion (noun):

That which is falsely believed or propagated.
demote
demote (verb):

To reduce to a lower grade or level.
denote
denote (verb):

To mark out plainly; to signify by a visible sign.
deterrent
deterrent (noun):

That which deters or prevents.

The stringent new laws against graffiti were intended to be a deterrent against vandalism.
detoxify
detoxify (verb):

To remove a poison.
diminish
diminish (verb):

To make smaller in any manner; to reduce in bulk or amount; to lessen.
dispute
dispute (verb):

To disagree, to call into question, to struggle over or against, or to discuss in an argumentative framework (i.e. to debate).

Faced with evidence of his misdeed, the accused could not dispute that he had been in the wrong.