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125 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Identify the error.

Jay failed a test and missed several assignments, and, as his teacher, I am unhappy for his performance.
Idiom.

The correct idiom is "unhappy with," not "unhappy for." The tenses are correct since the unhappiness continues, although Jay has already failed the test and missed the assignments.
Identify the error.

I thought that Francis gave a wonderful speech when he went up to except the award.
Diction.

When "except" is used as a verb, it means to leave out or exclude. THe word intended here is "accept," which means to receive. The past tense is used correctly and consistently.
Identify the error.

Practice didn't actually start until after eight o'clock, Coach Gilson was running quite late.
Run-ons and fragments.

These two independent clauses aren't joined correctly. The second clause explains the first: "Practice didn't actually start until after eight o'clock because Coach Gilson was running quite late."
Identify the error.

With over 60 cars and a 700-passenger capacity, Xian was awed by the train's size.
Modifiers.

The sentence says Xian has 60 cars. The modifier should be closer to what it modifies, "train." This also makes the verb active instead of passive. "With over 60 cars and a 700-passenger capacity, the train's size awed Xian.
Identify the error.

Besides making contributions to the children's toy drive, Jane is also volunteering at the soup kitchen as well.
Wordiness.

The combination of "besides" and "as well" is redundant; one or the other is sufficient. The verbs "making" and "volunteering" are used correctly in a parallel structure.
Identify the error.

In contrast to the difficult novels of James Joyce, Jane Austen is often found by first year students to be very engaging.
Comparisons.

The sentence says that Jane Austen is more engaging he James Joyce's novels. The correct comparison would be to Jane Austen's works.
Identify the error.

The weather was so beautiful that the girls stayed and swum in the lake all afternoon.
Irregular verbs.

The past tense of swim is swam, not swum. The rest of the action in the sentence (was, stayed) is consistently in the past tense, so swam is the correct verb form.
Identify the error.

First I will interview the candidates, and then their computer skills will be evaluated by me.
Unnecessary passive.

The sentence begins with an active verb, then shifts into the passive voice. For parallel structure and simplicity, both verbs should be in the active voice (I will interview...I will evaluate).
Identify the error.

Several of them were damages, but this is the only one of the puppet show's marionettes that have been sent away for repairs.
Subject-verb agreement.

The subject is the singular pronoun "one," not the plural "marionettes," so a singular verb is needed (has been sent). "Them" is the correct pronoun because its antecedent is "marionettes."
Identify the error.

When Ms. Everly saw Miles and Jim in the hallway, she stopped to congratulate him on winning the scholarship.
Ambiguity.

It's not clear whether Ms. Everly congratulated Miles or Jim. Replacing "him" with one of the boys' names will eliminate this ambiguity.
Identify the error.

The picture in the cookbook looked delicious, but when I made the cake myself, it turned out horribly.
Adjective/adverb.

"Horribly" modifies the noun "cake," not the verb "turned out," so it should be the adjective. (The cake didn't perform the action of turning out badly; it was horrible.) "But" is an appropriate conjunction here, since it expresses an element of contrast.
Identify the error.

The Reilly sisters were committed to literacy, so each of them gave annual donations to our summer reading program.
Noun agreement.

The descriptors "each" and "annual" tell us that there was one donation per sister per year, but the noun "donations" is plural. The sentence should say that "each of them gave an annual donation."
Identify the error.

Of the seven spellers who advanced to the regional competition, Carole is clearly the better prepared, despite her late entry into the contest.
Comparative/superlative.

When three or more things are compared, the superlative (best) is used. The shift in tense is correct; it indicates that the spellers have already advanced, and Carole is still the best prepared.
Identify the error.

Between you and I, I don't believe that the changes Senator Liu has promised are going to come about.
Pronoun case.

Because it is the object of the preposition "between," the objective case "me" should be used instead of the subjective "I." "Are" is the correct verb because it refers to the plural subject changes.
Identify the error.

One of my students was concerned about passing the final, so I suggested completing the extra exercises at the back of their book.
Pronoun agreement.

The pronoun "their" is plural, but its singular antecedent, "one," is singular. A singular pronoun (her book) or an article (the book) would be correct. The two verbs are both correct in the past tense, since both actions take place at the same time.
Identify the error.

At the moment when Thom called my cell phone, I am just trying to hail a cab to get downtown.
Verb tenses.

Both actions take place at the same time, so there's no reason to shift from past tense to the present. "I was trying" expresses that the action was ongoing in the past.
Identify the error.

The contract gave Lisa a choice between recieving a lump payment at the conclusion of the project and to be paid biweekly from the payroll.
Parallel.

The phrase "a choice between" sets up a parallel structure, so the two items should be in the same form. Lisa had a choice between "recieving" and "being paid." "Biweekly" is the correct adverbial form to modify being paid.
Identify the error.

I am so excited for going on the senior class trip to Washington, DC.
Idiom.

The correct idiom is not "excited for" but "excited about going" or "excited to go."
Identify the error.

After spending over two hours in the waiting room, Ida was becoming hasty.
Diction.

"Hasty" means fast or in a hurry and is probably not the intended word. A better word choice for the result of waiting too long might be "impatient" or "restless."
Identify the error.

We appreciate your concern, but this issue needs to be resolved y the vice-president and I.
Pronoun case.

"I" is not the subject here; it's the object of the preposition "by." The correct case is "me": "this issue needs to be resolved by the vice-president and me."
Identify the error.

The drama club members met after school, and the dusty backdrops were washed by them.
Unnecessary passive.

The sentence switches from the active to the passive voice. To be concise and to maintain parallel structure, it should read, "The drama club members met after school and washed the dusty backdrops."
Identify the error.

Besides bringing Elaine to the hairdresser, I picked up some groceries for her in addition.
Wordiness.

"Besides...in addition" is redundant. The verb forms in the sentence are correct, and the wordiness can be fixed by omitting "in addition."
Identify the error.

It would be simpler to ship the boxes to my parents' house in Albany for the summer than renting a storage space in the city.
Parallel.

Two actions are being compared and must be in the same form despite the intervening phrase "to my parents' house...It would be simpler to ship...than to rent."
Identify the error.

The papers that Mia submitted used only two sources, failed to include a definitive thesis statement, and were not as thoughtfully written as Rick.
Comparison.

As the sentence is written, it compares Mia's paper with Rick himself--not with Rick's paper. "Were" is the correct ver here, since it agrees with its subject, "papers."
Identify the error.

Before I send the committee the report, two of my clasmates helped me to edit it.
Verb tense.

The mixing of tenses here doesn't make sense: "I send" is in the present, while "helped" is in the past. Changing the verbs to "I send...my classmates help (or will help)" or "I sent...my classmates helped" would make the sentence correct.
Identify the error.

She wasn't really worried with how the results of the exam would affect her career.
Idiom.

The correct English idiom is not "worried with" but "worried about" or "concerned with." The rest of the sentence is well written, and "affect" is used correctly to mean "influence" or "change."
Identify the error.

The movie's surprise ending was a long-standing joke among the two of us.
Diction.

"Among" is used to refer to three or more items or people. When only two are reffered to, use "between." The phrase "long-standing joke" is idiomatically correct.
Identify the error.

Although Carey hadn't seen the group in several years, he and them got along extremely well.
Pronoun case.

Both pronouns are the subjects of the main verb "got along," so both need to be in the subjective case: "he and they got along extremely well."
Identify the error.

While some of use may not have experience in the field, you can feel confident that this training will prepare you for the work.
Pronoun agreement.

The switch from "us" in the first half of the sentence to "you" in the second half doesn't make sense, since both phrases refer to the same group. Change "some of use" to "some of you" for consistency.
Identify the error.

I had a hard time during my first semester here, but I am doing good this term.
Adjective/adverb.

"Good" is an adjective and should modify a noun: "My grades are good this term." Here, the modifier describes the verb "doing," so the correct modifier is an adverb: "I am doing well this term."
Identify the error.

After the home team played the visiting team, their coach encouraged them to shake hands.
Ambiguity.

Do the pronouns "their" and "them" refer to "the home team", "the visiting team", or both? Clarify this: "after the game, the home team's coach encouraged them to shake hands with the visiting team."
Identify the error.

Maureen had gone away for most of the week, a pile of work awaited her when she returned.
Run-ons and fragments.

A conjunction (and,so) or a semicolon is necessary to separate the two independent clauses. The change in tense is right, since the first action was completed before the second occurred.
Identify the error.

the rumored buyout of several companies have made many employees fear for their jobs.
Subject-verb agreement.

The subject of the verb "have" is "buyout," not "companies." Since "buyout" is singular, the verb needs to be singular (The rumored buyout...has made). "Their" is correct for the antecedent "employees."
Identify the error.

We learned that the car had a transmission problem, so it was brought to the shop by us over the weekend.
Unnecessary passive.

There's no reason to switch from active to passive voice: "We learned...so we brought." "Over the weekend" is idiomatic and is used correctly in the sentence.
Identify the error.

The five flights of stairs had exhausted her, so she lied down for a quick nap before dinner.
Irregular verbs.

The correct past tense of the intransitive verb "to lay" is "laid." "The five flights of stairs had exhausted her" is correctly in the past perfect tense, since its action was completed before the other action.
Identify the error.

Rhea was envious of Jill's new car, it being the latest model from National Motors.
Wordiness.

"It being" is wordy and unnecessary; this phrase can be left out to make the second part of the sentence a simple modifier for Jill's new car. "Envious of" is a good idiomatic phrase.
Identify the error.

Having lapsed over a year earlier, he finally renewed his subscription.
Modifiers.

The sentence seems to say that "he," the subject of the sentence, had lapsed. The modifier should be moved closer to "subscription": "He finally renewed his subscription, which had lapsed over a year earlier."
Identify the error.

Darius is still receiving a failing grade in math, and he has had a tutor for nine months.
The two parts of the sentence are in contrast: Since Darius has a tutor, he shouldn't be failing. Use a transition that expresses contrast, such as "however," "although," or "yet." The verb tenses are logical.
Identify the error.

Earlier in the day, I meet my parents for breakfast at a sidewalk cafe.
Verb tense.

The opening phrase laces the action in the past, so it doesn't make sense to use the present tense of "meet." The correct form of this irregular verb is "met."
Identify the error.

Each member of the group should be sure they arrive at the airport two hours before the flight departs.
Pronoun agreement.

The pronoun "they" is plural, but its antecedent, "each" is singular. Use a singlar pronoun (each member...should be sure she arrives) or rephrase he sentence without a pronount (each member...should be sure to arrive).
Identify the error.

Lauren couldn't decide whether she wanted to go straight home or stopping at the store.
The two actions are being compared, so they must be in the same form: "to go straight homme" or "to stop at the store." The infinitive is the idiomatically correct form to use with wanted.
Identify the error.

After I take Baxter for a walk, I stopped in at the neighbors' to pick up their mail, since they were out of town.
Verb tenses.

Since the first action occurred before the others, it shouldn't be in the present tense: "I took Baxter for a walk." The past perfect isn't nexessary since the word "after" establishes the sequence of events."
Identify the error.

Each of the students who plans to go on the class trip to Guatemala must have vaccinations.
Subject-verb agreement.

The subject of this sentence, "each," is singular, but "who plans" is a sub-clause in which the verb must agree with the antecedent of the pronoun "who"--the plural "students"--so "who plan" is correct.
Identify the error.

I paid some outstanding bills today, although my bonus from work was larger than expected.
Transitions.

"Although" is not logical here; it implies that the bonus would have prevented the payment of the bills. The correct transition would be "because" or "since."
Identify the error.

Each of the four girls has her own talents, but Miranda is clearly the better dancer.
Comparative/superlative.

Since four people are being compared, a superlative rather than a comparative should be used. Miranda would be the "better" dancer of two, but the "best" of four. "Each" is singular, so the singular verb "has" is correct.
Identify the error.

Alex thought about cheating, but knew a guilty conscious would get the best of him eventually.
Diction.

The word "concious" is an adjective that means thoughtful or aware. The word needed here is the noun "conscience." "Eventually" is correct, since it is an adverb modifying the verb "get."
Identify the error.

My favorite parts of our summer at the beack were swimming as the sun came up and to bring a picnic lunch on an afternoon hike.
Parallel.

Two actions follow "My favorite parts...were," so both should be in the same form: "swimming as the sun came up and bringing a picnic lunch on an afternoon hike." "Were" is the correct verb for the plural subject parts.
Identify the error.

I wanted to go on the class trip to Mexico; my Spanish was not fluent enough.
Transitions.

When two ideas are related, a conjunction helps to show the relationship. In this case, it's one of contrast: "I wanted to go on the class trip to Mexico, but my Spanish was not fluent enough."
Identify the error.

Neither of us have as good a chance at the lead role as Fay has.
Subject verb agreement.

"Neither" is a singular pronoun, so it takes a singular verb. It may help to imaginve the word "one" after "neither" (and either): "Neither one of us has..." The construction "as good a chance...as Fay has" is idiomatically correct and parallel.
Identify the error.

I lived in Greece for six months, during which time I had enjoyed many kinds of Greek food.
Verb tense.

Since the action "enjoyed" takes place at the same time as the action "lived," the verbs should be in the same tense. The simple past works: "...during which time I enjoyed many kinds of Greek food."
Identify the error.

Because he was so busy, Anthony agreed with William that they wouldn't be able to meet after all.
Ambiguity.

It's clear whether Anthony or William is the one who was busy. "Because Anothony was so busy, he agreed with William that they wouldn't be able to meet after all."
Identify the error.

Neil has been informed by me that I will take away his television privileges if his behavior does not improve.
Unnecessary passive.

"I" is the subject of both verbs ("informed" and "will take"), so there's no reason to put one in the passive voice and the second in the active. A consistent active voice makes the sentence flow better: "I informed Neil that I will take away..."
Identify the error.

Trapped in the house by the snow, unable to shovel a path to the garage.
Run-ons and fragments.

This fragment consists of two modifying phrases with no subject or verb. "They were trapped in the house by the snow, unable to shovel a path to the garage."
Identify the error.

Known for her stubbornness, Tisha's father had a hard time convincing her to go.
Modifiers.

The sentence says that Tisha's father is knwon for Tisha's stubbornness. "Tisha was known for her stubbornness, so her father had a hard time convincing her to go." The phrase "had a hard time" is idiomatically correct and "convincing" is the right form to follow it.
Identify the error.

I studied for several weeks, but my score was 75 percent higher than the first time I took the exam.
"But" implies a contrast between the first and second clauses. "And" or "so" is a more appropriate way to join the two ideas, since the second par of the sentence is a logical result of the first.
Identify the error.

I will send the cover letter this afternoon, but I'm not sure to who I should address it.
Pronoun case.

"Who" is the object of the preposition "to," not the subject here, so the correct form is "whom." The verb tenses are logical.
Identify the error.

Mina and her sister are both petite, but Mina is the smallest.
Comparative/superlative.

When three or more things are compared, a superlative (-est) is used. Since only two things are compared here, it should say that Mina is the "smaller." "Are" is the correct verb form in the first clause because the subject, "Mina and her sister," is plural.
Identify the error.

Each of us faces our own challenges when it comes to working as a team.
Pronoun agreement.

The plural pronoun "our" should be replaced with a singular pronoun to match its singular antecedent: "Each of us faces his or her own challenges." The subject "each" corectly takes a singular verb.
Identify the error.

I am not entirely fluent in Cherokee, so I gave the book to a native speaker who could translate it more faithful.
Adjective/adverb.

"Faithful" is meant to modify the verb "translate"; the adverb, "faithfully," is needed. The present tense (am not) is correct in the first part of the sentence, since it describes a continuing state of being.
Identify the error.

Marisa and Annie were doing the dishes when she broke a glass.
Ambiguity.

Since there are two females, Marisha and Annie, it's not clear which one broke the glass. Rephrase to clarify: "Marisa broke a glass as she and Annie were doing the dishes."
Identify the error.

My house, as well as the other structures on my property, are insured against earthquake damage.
Subject-verb agreement.

The verb here needs to agree with its subject, "house," which is singular, even though the phrase directly preceding the vverb contains a plural noun (structures). "Insured against" is idiomatically correct.
Identify the error.

My mom enjoyed her experience at the spa so much that I was encouraged by her to go there too.
Unnecessary passive.

The sentence changes from the active to the passive for no reason. Rephrase the second half as "she encouraged me to go there too" for a parallel construction and better flow.
Identify the error.

Chris finally reparied the doorknob, which had broke several months earlier.
Irregular verbs.

The correct form of this irregular verb is "had broken," not "had broke." The past perfect tense is correct, since the action of breaking takes place before the other past action in the sentence.
Identify the error.

The mix CDs that I bought were more contemporary and better suited to a party than Rodney.
Comparisons.

The two items being compared are "the mix CDs that I bought" and "Rodney." Presumably the author intends to compare her CDs to Rodney's, so the second item should be changed to "Rodney's CDs."
Identify the error.

Both tuition costs as well as the dropout rate have skyrocketed during the dean's tenure.
Wordiness.

"Both...as well as" is redundant and wordy. The standard phrasing is "both...and." In the corrected sentence, "have" is the correct verb form, since its subject, "costs and the dropout rate," is plural.
Identify the error.

Kenzo's grandmother encouraged him to choose a local college, concerned about the rising costs of travel.
Modifiers.

The second half of the sentence describes Kenzo's grandmother, not the college. "Kenzo's grandmother, concerned about the rising costs of travel, encouraged him to choose a local college.
Identify the error.

Marina's background qualified her for the job; she lacked the management skills to run such a large department.
Transitions.

The two ideas in these clauses would be better expressed by joining them with a transition that clarifies their relationship. For example, replace the semicolon with a comma and "but" or "although."
Identify the error.

Charlotte started walking before she was a year old her parents could hardly keep up with her.
Run-ons and fragments.

There are two independent clauses in the sentence that need to be either joined by a comma and an appropriate conjunction or separated by a semicolon.
Identify the error.

We had to say goodbye at the end of the summer, but I promised to keep in touch to her.
Idiom.

The correct idiom is "keep in touch with," not "keep in touch to." "But" is the right conjuction, since it expresses the contrast between the first idea, saying goodbye, and the second, kepping in touch.
Identify the error.

Even though Pat knew he had done nothing wrong, he felt that he should of tried harder.
Verb tense.

"Should of tried" is an incorrect version of the verb form "should have tried." The past tense is used correctly and consistently, and "harder" is the correct form to modify the verb "tried."
Identify the error.

Donna felt both honored by the attention and was a little uncomfortable with taking all the credit.
Parallel.

The first verb, "felt," precedes "both" and applies to both "honored" and "uncomfortable," so the second verb, "was," should be omitted to create a parallel structure. "Taking the credit" is an idiomatically correct phrase.
Identify the error.

As soon as we decided to collaborate on the chapter, the publisher will request more information about its focus.
Verb tenses.

"As soon as" signifies that the second action will happen immediately after the first, so the shift from past to future tense doesn't make sense. "As soon as we decide...the publisher will..."
Identify the error.

None of us has been to New York before, so you will need to pay extra attention as we move around the city.
Pronoun agreement.

Since the same group is being addressed throughout the sentence, the pronouns should be consistent; there's no reason for the switch from "us" to "you" and back to "we." "Has" is the correct verb form; its subject "none" is singular.
Identify the error.

In all honesty, we are not convinced that you are as committed to the team as her.
"Her" is the subject (of the implied verb is), not the object, so the subjective casse "she" should be used. The verb tenses are consistent.
Identify the error.

Of the three permenant jobs I have had in this field, I am happier in this one because of the flexibility it offers.
Comparative/superlative.

The narrator is comparing three things, so the superlative "happiest" should be used. The past tense (I have had) is used correctly to refer to jobs that the narrator has held in the past.
Identify the error.

All of the children in the toddler room at Louisa's day care have their own personal mat for nap time.
Noun agreement.

The plural noun "children" and the adjective "personal" disagree with the singular "mat"--multiple children would have "mats." "Have is the right verb; its subject is the plural "children."
Identify the error.

The survey, which showed a high satisfaction rating, was sent to all customers separate from their bills.
Ajective/adverb.

Since "separate" is meant to modify "sent," not "customers," the adverb form "separately" should be used. The relative pronoun "which" is correct here, since that clause is not necessary to the sentence.
Identify the error.

Crying inconsolably, the young mother and her baby entered the room just as the eulogy began.
Ambiguity.

It's not clear whether the mother, the baby, or both are cyring inconsolably. "The young mother, crying inconsolably, entered the room with her baby..." Or "The young mother entered the room with her baby, who was crying inconsolably,..."
Identify the error.

Gita, on behalf of all of the performers, want to thank you for your generous donations to their travel fund.
Subject-verb agreement.

The subject is not "performers" but "Gita," so the verb should be the singular "wants." The possessive pronoun "their" is correct, since the travel fund is apparentlyfor all of the performers.
Identify the error.

The board of directors is happy to announce that the vacation policy has been reinstated by it due to popular demand.
Unnecessary passive.

There's no reason for the switch from the active to the passive voice, since the board of directors performed both actions. "The board is happy to announce that it has reinstated the vacation policy..."
Identify the error.
Unfortunately, although the Wileys had a wonderful time on their vacation, they came home to discover that a pipe had bursted and flooded the basement.
Irregular verbs.

The past perfect tense of the irregular verb "burst" is "had burst," not "had bursted." The past perfect tense is correct here because the pipe's bursting occurred before "they came home."
Identify the error.

When we had climbed this weekend, I reached a higher point than Laure, although she is an experienced rock climber.
Verb tenses.

There is no reason for the perfect tense in the first clause; the two actions are simultaneous. "When we climbed this weekend..." The comparison here is fine, the verb "did" is implied after Laure.
Identify the error.

I believe that of all the teams that are here, our team is the team that is best prepared for the competition.
Wordiness.

The repetition of "team" is wordy and unnecessary. The second and third can be removed to make the sentence flow more smoothly: "ours is the best prepared for the competition." The use of "all" implies that several teams are present, so the superlative "best" is correct.
Identify the error.

Responsible for the success of the yearbook, I could tell that Jon was under a lot of stress as the deadline approached.
Modifiers.

Jon's stress before the deadline means he, not the speaker, is responsible for the yearbook. Move the modifier. "I could tell that Jon, responsible for the success of the yearbook, was under a lot of stress..."
Identify the error.

The majority of the crowd was in the plaza to support the speaker, so there were a few protestors who made their opinions known.
Transitions.

The second part of the sentence does not follow logically from the first; replace "so" with a transition that expresses contrast, such as "although." "Were" is correct for its plural subject protesters.
Identify the error.

Sunshine House providing secure housing for senior citizens, while allowing them to maintain their independence.
Run-ons and fragments.

This sentence includes a subject (Sunshine House), but no verb, just two modifying phrases. The first should be changed to a main clause to create a complete sentence: "Sunshine House provides secure housing..."
Identify the error.

We were both more upset that the intruder had interrupted our privacy than that several pieces of jewelry had been stolen.
Diction.

"Interrupted" means caused a lapse in. A better word choice is "invaded," which means enroached upon or violated. "More upset that...than that" is good parallel structure.
Identify the error.

Distracted by the attractions in the haunted house, Larry didn't realize that a man dressed as a vampire had creeped up behind him.
Irregular verbs.

The past tense of the irregular verb "creep" is "crept," not "creeped." The modifier "distracted by the other attractions in the haunted house" is correctly followed by the subject if modifies, "Larry."
Identify the error.

After the program begins, some of the dancers will wait backstage, while other are following Mme. Lavelle to the costume area.
Parallel.

The two actions here take place at the same time. For parallel structure, the sentence should state that one set "will wait" and others "will follow." If this sequence of events occurs regularly, both verbs could be in the present tense, instead.
Identify the error.

Maria will have finised her master's degree when Ariel had started her first year of high school.
Verb tenses.

The first event is completed before the second occurs, so the verb tenses should reflect this: "Maria will have finished her master's degreewhen Ariel starts her first year of high school."
Identify the error.

Ms. Rasheed gives each student a comprehensive review of their class presentation and research paper.
Pronoun agreement.

"Each student" is singular, so the plural "their" is wrong. Use "his or her" or rephrase to avoid the pronoun. "Ms. Rasheed gives a comprehensive review of each student's class presentation and research paper." "Includes" is correct for the singular subject "review."
Identify the error.

The police will need a statement that details who you saw when you entered the bank lobby just after the robbery occurred.
Pronoun case.

The pronoun "who" is the object of the verb "saw," so the objective case should be used (whom you saw).
Identify the error.

After visiting Dublin and Paris, I decided that I liked Dublin, with its Georgian architecture and accessible culture, best.
Comparative/superlative.

The adjective "best" is superlative. Since only two things are being compared, the comparative should be used: "I like Dublin...better."
Identify the error.

As part of the department expansion project, all of our faculty members wrote a proposal for different federal grants.
Noun agreement.

"All" is plural, so all of the faculty members would write multiple "proposals." The adjective "different" is another hint that a plural object is needed here.
Identify the error.

Tony was unable to be here today, but he wanted you to know that he is real sorry about the outcome of the election.
Adjective/adverb.

"Real" modifies the adjective "sorry," so an adverb (really) is necessary. The word "unable" is followed by the idiomatically correct infinitive "to be."
Identify the error.

Because he had been looking forward to it for so long, Ali said that he would go to the concert with Matt.
Ambiguity.

It's unclear whether Ali or Matt has been looking forward to the concert. Replace the first "he" with the correct name or rephrase the sentence. The second "he" is correctly in the subjective case because it is the subject of the clause.
Identify the error.

Only one of the neighbors, who have all expressed concern about the speed of traffic on our street, attend the community meeting regularly.
Subject-verb agreement.

The subject is not "neighbors" but the singular "one," so the correct form is "attends." However, the plural verb form "have" is correct because its subject, "who," refers to the neighbors.
Identify the error.

Vermont's fall weather is beautiful, but Florida is much warmer.
Comparisons.

The sentence attempts to compare the weather in the two states, but in effect compares Vermont's weather to the state of Florida. To correct the error, say "Florida's is much warmer."
Identify the error.

All of the course requirements for the degree had been completed by Greg, so he began preparing to write his thesis.
Unnecessary passive.

Both verbs should be in the active voice, especially since Greg performs both actions: "Greg had completed...so he began." The shift from past perfect to past tense expresses the sequence of events.
Identify the error.

As soon as the family arrived at the beach, Lakshmi realized that they should have brung more snakcs for the children.
Irregular verbs.

The past tense of the irregular verb "bring" is "brought," not "brung." "They" is the correct pronoun, since it refers to all the members of the "family."
Identify the error.

Unlike the Spanish club, the projects submitted by the history club at Roosevelt High cover a wide range of time periods.
Comparisons.

The sentence erroneously compares "projects" with "the Spanish club"--not, as the author inteded, with "the Spanish club's projects." "Cover" is the correct in the plural because subject is "projects," not "club."
Identify the error.

Because of the fact that I was sick, I decided to skip the book club meeting this month even though I had enjoyed the book.
Wordiness.

"Because of the fact that" is an unnecessarily wordy phrase; "because" alone conveys the meaning. "Had enjoyed" is correctly in the past perfect tense because it takes place before "decided."
Identify the error.

Tomoyuki offered Mirah a ride on his way out, because she wasn't yet ready to leave.
Transitions.

If Mirah wasn't ready to leave, it follows that she would not have accepted the ride, so "because" is the wrong transition. "But" shows the correct contrast between the two elements of the sentence.
Identify the error.

Slipping on the freshly mopped floor, I saw Ella nearly fall asll as she entered the room.
Modifiers.

It is possible that the narrator was slipping, but it seems likely the modifier was intended for Ella, who nearly fell. "Freshly" is the correct adverbial form, since it modifies "mopped" and not "floor."
Identify the error.

She was always an overachiever, in high school and college she joined every college she could.
Run-ons and fragments.

Two independent clauses are joined here with only a comma, and need a conjunction or semicolon to correct the run-on.
Identify the error.

After months of research, Julia finally found the unique owner of the used car she had recently purchased.
Diction.

"Unique" means only, which doesn't make sense since we know the car has had at least two owners. "Original," which means first or earliest, might have been intended.
Identify the error.

Addie and I are just going to the bank, but you're welcome to come along in the ride.
Idiom.

The correct idiom is "come along for the ride," not "come along in the ride." The subjective pronoun "I" is used correctly, and the verb "are" is correct because the subject is plural (Addie and I).
Identify the error.

We thought that Micah had done a great job providing support both to the athletes and their families during a stressful season.
Parallel.

A second "to" is needed before "their families" to maintain the parallel structure established with "both to the athletes." Or you could move the word "both": "to both the athletes and their families."
Identify the error.

No one who missed the department meeting will know that they need to install the new antivirus software.
Pronoun agreement.

The subject "no one" is singular, so the pronoun needs to be singular (he or she needs to install). Or you could replace the antecedent: "Those who missed the meeting will not know that they need to install the new software."
Identify the error.

I know that it must have been a difficult decision, but I really admire you coming forward with this information.
Pronoun case.

The correct phrase is "your coming forward," since the gerund takes a possessive pronoun. The idiomatic phrase "coming forward" is used correctly, and the verb tenses are consistent.
Identify the error.

Four days before I have arrived in Paris, I will take the train to Madrid.
Verb tenses.

The phrase "four days before" tells us that taking the train occurs prior to arriving in Paris, so there's no reason for one verb to be in the past or perfect tense: "Four days before I arrive...I will take."
Identify the error.

My dad and I are both great at golf, but out of the whole family, my brother Brian is clrealy better.
Comparative/superlative.

At least three people are being compared here (my dad and I and Brian), so the superlative form, "best," should be used. "I" is the correct pronoun because it is part of the subject.
Identify the error.

The board members all have different view of the recent drop in test scores.
Noun agreement.

There are multiple board members, and if each one has a different view, than there must be multiple "views" as well: they "all have different views." "Recent" is the correct modifier, since "drop" is a noun, not a verb.
Identify the error.

At the beginning of the meeting, Jack told Louis that his conference call had been delayed.
Ambiguity.

It isn't clear to whom the pronoun "his" refers. Replace "his" with a possessive (Jack's or Louis's). "Had been delayed" is correct, since the rest of the sentence is in the simple past tense.
Identify the error.

Scot had been concerned about the speech, but everyone told him that it was presented very professional.
Adjective/adverb.

"Professional" modifies not the noun "speech" but the way in which it was "presented," so an adverb (professionally) is necessary. The past perfect (had been concerned) is correct because that action was completed before another past action occurred.
Identify the error.

The new siding, as well as the windows, already look like a thorough washing is needed.
Subject-verb agreement.

The subject is "siding," not "windows," so the verb needs to be singular: "The siding...looks." The verb "is" agrees with its subject "washing."
Identify the error.

As soon as it has been edited by me, I will send a copy of the manuscript to the author.
Unnecessary passive.

Both clauses refer to actions that are performed by the speaker, so there is no reason for one verb to be passive and one active. "As soon as I have edited...I will send."
Identify the error.

The best part of the parade had already past the house by the time Nora arrived at the party.
Irregular verbs.

The correct past tense of "pass" is "passed." "Past" is an adjective. THe past perfect tense is correct, since the parade's passing ended by the time the second action (arrived) took place.
Identify the error.

My opinion of Elise's prose, after reading the two manuscripts several times, is much higher than Jeremy's sonnets.
Comparisons.

The sentence erroneously compares sonnets with the author's opinion. The end of the sentence should be rewritten "my opinion of Jeremy's sonnets."
Identify the error.

If has been shown to be a proven fact that a child whose parents read to her is mroe likely to succeed in school.
Wordiness.

"It has been shown" and "proven fact" are redundant; one or the other is enough. "Is" is the correct verb form in the dependent clause introduced by "that," since the subject is the singular "child."
Identify the error.

Suddenly splitting from the tree, I managed to jump to the side before the branch hit the ground.
Modifiers.

The phrase "suddenly splitting from the tree" needs to be next to the thing it modifies, which is "branch," not "I." "Managed" and "hit" are both correctly in the past tense.
Identify the error.

Gale was unhappy with her birthday gift, as her parents had put a lot of thought into it.
Transitions.

The conjunction "although" would be a better transition to show that Gale's reaction was unexpected. "Had put" is correctly in the past perfect tense, since it occurrs before "was unhappy."
Identify the error.

I have been employed by Lewis University for seven years. Providing administrative support and interacting with the student population.
Run-ons and fragments.

The second "sentence" is a fragment--just a pair of modifying phrases. Join them to the first sentence with a comma. The parallel structure (providing...and interacting) is correct.
Identify the error.

I will make a note on my application that I had returned from Paris six months ago.
Verb tense.

There's no reason to use the past perfect tense here; the simple past (I returned) expresses the idea. The use of the future tense (I will make) is correct if the note has not yet been made.
Identify the error.

Having spent several years working in Brazil, Kai weeped at her reunion with her brother upon her return.
Irregular verbs.

The past tense of "weep" is "wept," not "weeped." The opening modifier is correctly placed, and "upon her return" is an idiomatic phrase that makes sense here.