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25 Cards in this Set

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austrian monk whose breeding experiments with peas shed light on the rules of inheritance
gregor mendel
who was a contemporary of darwin but his work was overlooked until the 20th century
mendel
darwin's theory of n.s was correct, but he didn't know
the mechanism of inheritance
created in the 1940's--a conceptual compilation of darwinian evolution, mendelian inheritance, and modern population genetics--brought all ideas of evolution together
the modern synthesis
phenotypes are selected by natural selection; genotypes and genes change along with this change over time. (phenotype changes, thus so does genotype)
adaptive evolution
all expressed traits of an organism
phenotype
the entire GENETIC makeup of an individual; or a subset of an individual's genes
genotype
a change in allele frequency in a population (change in the gene pool)
evolution
all of the individuals of a species in a given area at a given time
population
examines the frequency, distribution, and inheritance of within a population
population genetics
the population genetics theorem that states that the frequencies of alleles and genotypes in a population will remain constant unless acted upon by non-mendelian processes (same from parent and offspring)
hardy-weinberg equilibrium
under strict menddelian inheritance, allele frequencies would remain constant from one generation to the next (har wein equil)
allele frequencies
hardy weinberg equation
for a two allele locus:
let p= the frequency of one allele in the population (dominant allele)
let q= the frequency of the other allele (recessive)
p+q=
p=
q=
1
1-q
1-p
genotypes should occur in the population according to
p^2+2pq+q^2=1
if allele and genotype frequency change
the population has evolved
evolution requires
a PHENOTYPIC AND GENOTYPIC CHANGE
all the species in a GIVEN AREA
population
what theory explains the dynamics of the gene pool?
hardy weinburg equilibrium
p^2
proportion of population that is HOMOZYGOUS for the first allele
2pq
proportion of the population that is herterozygous
q^2
proportion of population that is homozygous
if there are only two alleles, the proportion of one plus the other must equal
100%
what would q be if p=0.6what would q be if p squared=.49
(q=square root of q squared * .3)
q=.4
q=
what would 2pq be if p=.5
.5