Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/80

Click to flip

80 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
A short, informal reference to a famous person, event, or piece of literature
allusion
You must borrow me Gargantua's mouth first. 'Tis a word too great for any mouth of this age's size. -Shakespeare
allusion
Opposition, or contrast, of ideas or words in a balanced or parallel construction
antithesis
Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice, moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue. -Barry Goldwater
antithesis
A sudden turn from the general audience to address a specific group or person or personified abstraction, absent or present
apostrophe
O books who alone are liberal and free, who give to all who ask of you and enfranchise all who serve you faithfully! - Richard de Bury
apostrophe
Harsh joining of sounds
cacophony
We want no parlay with you and your grisly gang who work your wicked will. -W. Churchill
cacophony
Slang (usually regional)
colloquial
Y’all
colloquial
Tangible details
concrete detail
The decaying house was yellow.
concrete detail
Suggested meaning of a word
connotation
Home
connotation
Dictionary definition of the word
denotation
House
denotation
Choice of words
diction
In our nature, however, there is a provision, alike marvellous and merciful, that the sufferer should never know the intensity of what he endures by its present torture, but chiefly by the pang that rankles after it.- The Scarlet Letter(This _____ is flow-… I mean… ornate)
diction
Pleasant joining of sounds
euphony
O star (the fairest one in sight)
euphony
Language understood outside of its literal meaning
figurative language
· She was a whale.
· He song was like the sun on a cool summer’s day.
figurative language
A reference to an event which took place prior to the beginning of a story or play.
flashback
The door opens slowly, and I can discern two glowing eyes against the darkness.It was a dark and stormy night. The rain slashed against the windows and panged against the roof. I heard a scratching on the wall. I drew closer. Then I saw it.
flashback
Story inside a story
framed story
Johnny crawled timidly into his father’s lap. The burly man didn’t look down at him; instead, he began whispering, as if to thin air: “Bill took us out to the corn field that day. He told us that he had found deer tracks. When we got there and saw the stolen guns, we knew what he was going to do, and yet we didn’t say or do anything. I’ll never forgive myself for that night.”
framed story
Exaggeration for emphasis or for rhetorical effect
hyperbole
I said "rare," not "raw." I've seen cows hurt worse than this get up and get well.
hyperbole
Descriptions that appeal to the senses.
imagery
When the evening is spread out against the skyLike a patient etherized upon a table.-"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T. S. Eliot
imagery
Expression of something which is contrary to the intended meaning; the words say one thing but mean another
irony
Romeo poisons himself because he believes Juliet is dead, but the audience knows that she is merely in an induced sleep. -Romeo and Juliet
irony
3 kinds of irony and definitions
verbal irony- someone says something, but means something completely different
situational irony- what is expected to happen is the opposite of what occurs
dramatic irony- the reader or audience knows something that the character does not
Implied comparison achieved through a figurative use of words; the word is used not in its literal sense, but in one analogous to it
metaphor
Life's but a walking shadow; a poor player,That struts and frets his hour upon the stage.-Shakespeare, Macbeth
metaphor
Reference to something with a name disproportionately lesser than its nature (a kind of litotes)
meiosis
Said of an amputated leg: "It's just a flesh wound" —Monty Python and the Holy Grail
meiosis
Present when rhythm is regular
meter
Iamb:Whose (u) woods (/) | these (u) are (/) | I (u) think (/) | I (u) know (/).
meter
Substitution of one word for another which it suggests
metonymy
· He is a man of the cloth
· The pen is mightier than the sword
metonymy
One syllable in length
monosyllabic
Dog
monosyllabic
The speaker or character who tells a story.
narration
“I met Dennis in the first grade. I’ll never forget the day he stood up for me: From that moment on we were fast friends.” (____ by a friend of Dennis)
narration
Occurs when a narrator knows everything about the characters and their situations, including their thoughts.
omniscient
“Although his exterior displayed something akin to sorrow, he fairly skipped with glee to be rid of his in-laws.”
omniscient
Apparent paradox achieved by the juxtaposition of words which seem to contradict one another
oxymoron
I must be cruel only to be kind. -Shakespeare, Hamlet
oxymoron
An assertion seemingly opposed to common sense, but that may yet have some truth in it
paradox
What a pity that youth must be wasted on the young. -George Bernard Shaw
paradox
Attribution of personality to an impersonal thing
personification
· England expects every man to do his duty. -Lord Nelson
· The ship began to creak and protest as it struggled against the rising sea.
personification
The viewpoint from which a story is told.
point of view
“I didn’t do anything!! You always blame me for everything that happens around here!!”(____: The older sister)
point of view
More than one syllable in length
polysyllabic
Centipede
polysyllabic
A play on words that sound similar or exactly the same
pun
· Ask for me tomorrow and you shall find me a grave man.-Romeo and Juliet
· When gambling became legal in the city, everyone agreed that the city was now a bettor place.
· Did you hear about the Frenchman who jumped off the Eiffel Tower wearing a parachute and landed in the river? The police didn’t arrest him because he was clearly in Seine.
pun
Usually defined as any question asked for a purpose other than to obtain the information the question requests; used for effect, emphasis, or provocation, or for drawing a conclusionary statement from the facts at hand
rhetorical question
· "Why me, God?!"
· "Why are you so stupid?"
· For if we lose the ability to perceive our faults, what is the good of living on? -Marcus Aurelius
rhetorical question
The similarity in sound of the ends of words: the last stressed syllable and the following unstressed syllables (if any)
rhyme
'Tis hard to say, if greater want of skill
Appear in writing, or in judging ill;
But of the two, much greater is th' offence
To tire the patience, than mislead the sense-Pope
rhyme
Use of mockery, verbal taunts, or bitter irony
sarcasm
". . . these days, arena names make little sense. For instance, not only does the National Car Rental Center, home of the Florida Panthers, promise little in the way of aesthetics, you can't even rent a car there. Same with the horseless Saddledome in Calgary. And despite the nation's affection for the old Maple Leaf Gardens, there's probably more foliage growing on the Hoover Dam."-Dave Bidini
sarcasm
An explicit comparison between two things using 'like' or 'as'
simile
My love is as a fever, longing stillFor that which longer nurseth the disease,-Shakespeare, Sonnet CXLVII
simile
Tries to capture a character's (or the writer's) internal thought processes
stream of consciousness
The mailman is here again. I despise the mailman. He always carries that ridiculous red pouch full to bursting with letters and papers and magazines and whatnot. I never get any letters. I wonder if he can see me… No, he can’t.
stream of consciousness
What is distinguished and what is distinguishing in writing. (Characteristic of the individual writer)
style
She had wandered, without rule or guidance, into a moral wilderness. Her intellect and heart had their home, as it were, in desert places, where she roamed as freely as the wild Indian in his woods. The scarlet letter was her passport into regions where other women dared not tread. Shame, Despair, Solitude! These had been her teachers - stern and wild ones - and they had made her strong, but taught her much amiss.-Scarlet Letter(Nathaniel Hawthorne’s ____ is characterized by elevated diction, complex and elaborate syntax, figurative language, and [visual] imagery.)
style
style is characterized by
diction, sentence structure, treatment of subject matter, and figurative language
Understanding one thing with another; the use of a part for the whole, or the whole for the part. (A form of metonymy.)
synecdoche
The U.S. won three gold medals. (Instead of, The members of the U.S. boxing team won three gold medals.)
synecdoche
How a sentence is put together (Sentence structure, word order, phrasing, parallelism)
syntax
Strong, you are. Much fear, I sense in you. (Anastrophe)
syntax
A sentence shorter than 5 words in length
telegraphic
The milk was warm. The sheets were clean. Francisco was the murderer.
telegraphic
Writer or speaker’s attitude towards the subject
tone
“The wretched fellow had stolen money from innocent citizens, destroyed public property, and above all, behaved in an utterly offensive manner to all who beheld him.And yet, in no more than an instant, he had saved the town.”(The new paragraph marks a change in _____ from disgusted to admiring.)
tone