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31 Cards in this Set

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Anadiplosis
beginning a phrase with the ending of a previous phrase: "Forthwith his former state and being forgets, / Forgets both joy and grief, pleasure and pain." (Milton, Paradise Lost)
Anaphora
Repetition of the same word or words at the beginning of consecutive syntactic units
Anastrophe
turning natural word order around: “To her I gave it.”
Antanaclasis
repeating a word, but in a different sense: "And thrice threefold the gates
Antimetabole
repeating a phrase in the opposite order: “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath.” (Jesus Christ)
Antithesis
opposition, or contrast of ideas or words in a balanced or parallel construction.( Brutus: Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Shakespeare, Julius Caesar)
Alliteration
Repetition of the consonant sounds in the beginning of a series of words
Archaisms
words used in the past which now date a piece of writing. eg. thee, thou, shalt etc.
Assonance
Repetition of a vowel syllable within a series of words (ex. Deep Sea)
Asyndeton
The omission of a conjunction from a list
Climax
arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of ascending power. Often the last emphatic word in one phrase or clause is repeated as the first emphatic word of the next.
Colloquialism
a word or phrase used in speech but not dignified in formal writing or speech. eg. 'cop' for policeman.
Conceit
a far fetched comparison
Encomium
warm or glorious praise
Epanalepsis
beginning and ending a line with the same word: “Cry, and all the world will cry.”
Epistrophe
repeating the same word or phrase at the end of two or more clauses or lines
Ellipsis
obviously leaving out a word
Hyperbole
exaggeration for emphasis or for rhetorical effect.
Isocolon
repeating words and sounds in phrases the same length: "Under so many frigid, so many frozen seas…”
Litotes
understatement: “Hitler didn’t love the Jewish people.”
Malapropism
mistakenly replacing one word with another that sounds similar but means something different. It was named for Mrs. Malaprop in Sheridan's The Rivals and used by Dogberry in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing
Metonymy
A figure of speech in which the name of one object is replaced by another which is closely associated (The President with the White House, Westminster for Parliament, ect.)
Onomatopoeia
use of words to imitate natural sounds, accommodation of sound to sense.
Oxymoron
two words juxtaposed that are opposite: "kind tyrants"
Parison
repeating words in grammatically parallel phrases: "Thou art my father, thou my author, thou..." (Milton, Paradise Lost)
Paradox
a seeming contradiction that is really true
Periphrasis
wordily going around a subject:
Pathos
feeling of sympathy aroused by literature
Polyptoton
repeating words from the same root: ". . . Which tempted our attempt, and wrought our fall. . . " (Milton, Paradise Lost)
Polysyndeton
The use of multiple conjunctions, usually where they are not strictly necessary
Synecdoche
using the part for the whole, as in "lend a hand"