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30 Cards in this Set

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volume an average human pair of lungs can hold ?
6 liters of air
refers to physical differences in volume , while these represent different combinations of lung volumes ( in relation to respiration and exhalation ) ?
lung volumes and lung capacities
breathing mechanism in mammals ?
tidal breathing
several factors that affect lung volume , may/may not be controlleld , and refer to
larger volume ?
smaller volume ?
larger volumes;
males
taller ppl
non-smokers
professional athletes
ppl living at high altitudes

smaller volumes;
males
shorter ppl
heavy smokers
non-athletes
ppl living at low altitudes
instrument used to measure
TV, VC, IC and ERV ?
spirometer
basic elements of a ventilatory pulmonary function test , used to distinguish between restrictive and obstructive pulmonary disease ?
TV (tidal volume)
VC (vital capacity)
IC (inspiratory capacity)
ERV(expiratory reserve volume)
RV (residual volume)
especially helpful in distinguishing between both types of pulmonary disease ?
FEV (forced expiratory volume)
FVC (forced vital capacity)
FRC
(functional residual capacity)
restrictive disease in which FEV and FVC volumes decrease, often in a normal range ?
pulmonary fibrosis
obstructive disease in which FEV and FVC volumes are often low and essentially normal, but flow rates are impeded ?
asthma or COPD
the maximum volume of air that a person can exhale after maximum inhalation,
also the maximum volume of air that a person can inhale after maximum exhalation ?
vital capacity
equation of vital capacity ?
IRV + TV + ERV
the sum of Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV) and Residual Volume (RV) ?
(FRC)functional residual capacity
(FRC)functional residual capacity ?
is the volume of air present in the lungs at the end of passive expiration
a lowered or elevated FRC that is often an indication of some form of this disease ?
respiratory disease
respiratory disease in which
the lungs are more compliant and therefore more susceptible to the outward recoil forces of the chest wall. These patients often have noticeably broader chests due to breathing at larger volumes ?
emphysema
volume an average human pair of lungs can hold ?
6 liters of air
refers to physical differences in volume , while these represent different combinations of lung volumes ( in relation to respiration and exhalation ) ?
lung volumes and lung capacities
breathing mechanism in mammals ?
tidal breathing
several factors that affect lung volume , may/may not be controlleld , and refer to
larger volume ?
smaller volume ?
larger volumes;
males
taller ppl
non-smokers
professional athletes
ppl living at high altitudes

smaller volumes;
males
shorter ppl
heavy smokers
non-athletes
ppl living at low altitudes
instrument used to measure
TV, VC, IC and ERV ?
spirometer
basic elements of a ventilatory pulmonary function test , used to distinguish between restrictive and obstructive pulmonary disease ?
TV (tidal volume)
VC (vital capacity)
IC (inspiratory capacity)
ERV(expiratory reserve volume)
RV (residual volume)
especially helpful in distinguishing between both types of pulmonary disease ?
FEV (forced expiratory volume)
FVC (forced vital capacity)
FRC
(functional residual capacity)
restrictive disease in which FEV and FVC volumes decrease, often in a normal range ?
pulmonary fibrosis
obstructive disease in which FEV and FVC volumes are often low and essentially normal, but flow rates are impeded ?
asthma or COPD
the maximum volume of air that a person can exhale after maximum inhalation,
also the maximum volume of air that a person can inhale after maximum exhalation ?
vital capacity
equation of vital capacity ?
IRV + TV + ERV
the sum of Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV) and Residual Volume (RV) ?
(FRC)functional residual capacity
(FRC)functional residual capacity ?
is the volume of air present in the lungs at the end of passive expiration
a lowered or elevated FRC that is often an indication of some form of this disease ?
respiratory disease
respiratory disease in which
the lungs are more compliant and therefore more susceptible to the outward recoil forces of the chest wall. These patients often have noticeably broader chests due to breathing at larger volumes ?
emphysema