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153 Cards in this Set

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44-60 John Donne
b. 1572 Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and Several Steps In My Sickness
44-60 Great preacher and poet of the 16th/17th century
John Donne
44-60 Wrote A Consolation to the Soul Against the Dying Life and Living Death of The Body
John Donne
44-60 17th century dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London
John Donne
44-60 George Herbert
17th cent. The Country Parson, one of the great works of practical theology of English literature. Also great poet.
44-60 Wrote The Country Parson
George Herbert
44-60 Two great poets of the 17th century
John Donne and George Herbert
44-60 Taught that everything a pastor did was part of his preaching ministry
George Herbert in The Country Parson
44-60 Oliver Cromwell
17th cent. Served in parliament and raised troops against Charles I. Lord Protector. Made Lord Protector in 1653. Reorganized Church of England, trying to provide faithful preachers in every church.
44-60 Raised troops against Charles I
Oliver Cromwell
44-60 Made Lord Protector in 1653
Oliver Cromwell
44-60 Reorganized Church of England, trying to provide faithful preachers in every church
Oliver Cromwell
44-60 Richard Baxter
17th cent. The Reformed Pastor, The Saints Everlasting Rest, A Call To The Unconverted. Great preacher/pastor. Advised “first light, then heat” in preaching. Be cautious of his theology: Watch out for neo-nomianism
44-60 Wrote The Reformed Pastor
Richard Baxter
44-60 Wrote The Saints Everlasting Rest
Richard Baxter
44-60 Wrote A Call To The Unconverted
Richard Baxter
44-60 Advised “first light, then heat” in preaching
Richard Baxter
44-60 Be cautious of his theology: Watch out for neo-nomianism
Richard Baxter
44-60 John Owen
17th cent. The Death of Death in the Death of Christ and The Savoy Declaration You don’t have to be cautious of his theology – read him for it! The John Calvin of England. Spurgeon said to master Owens’s work was to be a profound theologian.
44-60 Wrote The Death of Death in the Death of Christ
John Owen
44-60 Wrote The Savoy Declaration
John Owen
44-60 The John Calvin of England
John Owen
44-60 Spurgeon said to master his work was to be a profound theologian
John Owen
44-60 John Bunyan
17th cent. The Pilgrim’s Progress (someone has called this “The Westminster confession of faith with people in it”) Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners The Sinner and the Spider the Pilgrim Hymn Mr. Bunyan’s Last Sermon. Sometimes known as “The tinker of Bedford.”
44-60 Wrote The Pilgrim’s Progress
John Bunyan
44-60 Someone has called this “The Westminster Confession of Faith with people in it
John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress
44-60 Wrote Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners
John Bunyan
44-60 Wrote The Sinner and the Spider
John Bunyan
44-60 Sometimes known as “The Tinker of Bedford”
John Bunyan
44-60 Samuel Rutherford
17th cent. Letters Lex Rex minister of parish of Anewith on the Salway. 1636 Exiled to Aberdeen to silence his preaching. Became a Scottish Commissioner to the Westminster Assembly after his release.
44-60 Famous for his many letters
Samuel Rutherford
44-60 Wrote Lex Rex
Samuel Rutherford
44-60 17th cent. minister of Parish of Anewith on the Salway
Samuel Rutherford
44-60 Exiled to Aberdeen to silence his preaching
Samuel Rutherford
44-60 Became a Scottish Commissioner to the Westminster Assembly after his release from exile
Samuel Rutherford
44-60 Francis Turretin
17th cent. Italian by descent. Genevan theologian Institutes of Elentic Theology (Elenctic means something like “polemic”) Most systematic in theologian on doctrinal issues in the Reformed camp after Calvin. His Institutes should be considered second only to Calvin’s.
44-60 17th cent. Italian by descent theologian of Geneva
Francis Turretin
44-60 Wrote Institutes of Elentic Theology
Francis Turretin
44-60 His Institutes should be considered second only to Calvin’s
Francis Turretin
44-60 Most systematic theologian on doctrinal issues in the Reformed camp after Calvin
Francis Turretin
44-60 J. S. Bach
17th cent. Life overlaps Count Zinnzendorf. a loyal Lutheran, stayed in the state church though he appreciated writings of the Pietists. “The Fifth Evangelist” – Bible student and competent theologian. Music flowed out of theological orthodoxy and biblical knowledge and personal piety. Wrote some 300 Cantatas: musical sermons with words taken from the scripture lesson of the day.
44-60 A loyal Lutheran, he stayed in the state church though he appreciated writings of the Pietists
J.S. Bach
44-60 Sometimes called “The Fifth Evangelist”
J.S. Bach
44-60 Bach’s music flowed out of
theological orthodoxy and biblical knowledge and personal piety.
44-60 Lady Huntingdon
18th cent. (Lady Selina Shirley) (1707-1791) and “the Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion” – major figure in the revival. 93 letters from Whitfield to Huntingdon. She gave her personal support and “Lady Huntingdon’s Connexion” where her money and influence was used to further revival in England
44-60 Lady Huntingdon was
Lady Selina Shirley
44-60 Lady Huntingdon lived
18th century
44-60 93 letters from Whitfield to her
Lady Huntingdon
44-60 Lady Huntingdon formed
“The Countess of Huntingdon’s Connexion”
44-60 Her money and influence was used to further the 18th cent. revival in England
Lady Huntingdon.
44-60 93 Letters from him to Lady Huntingdon
George Whitfield
44-60 John Newton
18th cent. Anglican clergyman and hymn writer – Converted slave-trader. Wrote The Olney Hymns with William Cowper. Vicar of St. Mary, Woolnoth. Preached a famous sermon series on the texts of Handle’s Messiah.
44-60 18th century Anglican clergyman and hymn-writer
John Newton
44-60 Converted slave-trader
John Newton
44-60 Wrote The Olney Hymns
John Newton and William Cowper
44-60 Vicar of St. Mary, Woolnoth
John Newton
44-60 John Newton was vicar of
St. Mary, Woolnoth
44-60 Preached a famous sermon series of the texts of Handle’s Messiah
John Newton
44-60 “The Log College”
the name given to a school that William Tennent, an Irish-born, Edinburgh-educated Presbyterian minister, conducted at Neshaminy, Bucks County, Pennsylvania from 1726 until his death in 1745. Here, in a ``log house, about twenty feet long and near as many broad,'' Tennent drilled his pupils in the ancient languages and the Bible and filled them with an evangelical zeal that a number of them, his four sons included, manifested conspicuously during the religious revivals known as The Great Awakening. The name ``Log College'' was at first applied derisively by Old Side Presbyterians who disliked some of the excitable and intrusive methods of its New Side graduates and disdained the narrowness of their training.
44-60 What was the Log College?
the name given to a school that William Tennent conducted in PA in the mid 18th cent. which impacted some of the New Side graduates who preached in the revivals of the Great Awakening.
44-60 The name given to a school that William Tennent conducted in PA in the mid 18th cent
Log College
44-60 John Eliot
17th cent. American Colonial clergyman. The first Bible printed in America was done in the native Algonquin Indian Language by John Eliot in 1663
44-60 First Bible printed in America was this type
printed in the native Algonquin Indian Language by John Eliot in 1663
44-60 First bible printed in America in year
1663 in Algonquin Indian Language by John Eliot
44-60 17th cent. American Colonial clergyman who ministered to the Algonquians
John Eliot
44-60 David Brainerd
18th cent. Missionary to the American Indians in New York, New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania. Born in Connecticut in 1718, he died of tuberculosis at the age of twenty-nine in 1747. Jonathan Edwards preached the funeral sermon and published the diary that David had kept.
44-60 18th cent. Missionary to the American Indians in New York, New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania
David Brainerd
44-60 Jonathan Edwards preached his funeral sermon and published the diary which he had kept
David Brainerd
44-60 George Fox
17th cent. English Dissenter and founder of the Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as the Quakers. Important writings include his journals and letters.
44-60 17th cent. English Dissenter and founder of the Religious Society of Friends
George Fox
44-60 Name associated with starting the Quakers
George Fox
44-60 Cotton Mather
17th cent. American Congregational minister and author, supporter of the old order of the ruling clergy, who became the most celebrated of all New England Puritans. He devoted his life to praying, preaching, writing, and publishing and still followed his main purpose in life of doing good. His book, Bonifacius, or Essays to Do Good (1710), instructs others in humanitarian acts. Wrote Magnalia Christi Americana, a miscellany of materials on the ecclesiastical history of New England.
44-60 17th cent. American Congregational minister and author, supporter of the old order of the ruling clergy, who became the most celebrated of all New England Puritans
Cotton Mather
44-60 He devoted his life to praying, preaching, writing, and publishing and still followed his main purpose in life of doing good
Cotton Mather
44-60 His book, Bonifacius, or Essays to Do Good (1710), instructs others in humanitarian acts
Cotton Mather
44-60 Wrote Magnalia Christi Americana, a miscellany of materials on the ecclesiastical history of New England.
Cotton Mather
44-60 Ebenezer Erskine
18th cent. Led a succession of the Church of Scotland in the 1733 because of the dead orthodoxy and patronage problems. Left and became what is the Associate Presbytery (ARP today). He, along with some other ministers, was rebuked and admonished, by the general assembly, for defending the doctrines contained in the Marrow of Modern Divinity. Erskine's published works consist chiefly of sermons. His Life and Diary was published in 1840
44-60 Led a succession of the Church of Scotland in the 1733 because of the dead orthodoxy and patronage problems
Ebenezer Erskine
44-60 Left the Church of Scotland and his group became what is the Associate Presbytery (ARP today)
Ebenezer Erskine
44-60 He, along with some other ministers, rebuked and admonished by the General Assembly for defending the doctrines contained in the Marrow of Modern Divinity
Ebenezer Erskine
44-60 Francis Makemie
17th cent. Regarded as the founder of American Presbyterianism. Born in Ireland, educated in Scotland, ordained for missionary work in America and arrived there in 1683. Labored as an itinerant evangelist in North Carolina, Maryland, the Barbados, and Virginia. Organized the Presbytery of Philadelphia in 1706.
44-60 Regarded as the founder of American Presbyterianism
Francis Makemie
44-60 Organized the Presbytery of Philadelphia in 1706
Francis Makemie
61 Describe the period between the Awakenings
American Revolution, Deism of Thomas Payne, Dislocation and Western Migrations
61 Beginnings of the Second Great Awakening
stirred in Virginia in the Hampden-Sydney College Revival of 1787
61 Date of Hampden-Sydney College Revival
1787
61 President of Hampden-Sydney College who was later president at Princeton
Archibald Alexander
61 Stirred by Hampden Sydney revival and carried it to his NC churches and later to Logan County Kentucky
James McGready
61 Frontier Revivals of the Second Great Awakening included
communion gatherings, Methodist camp meetings, circuit riders (Asbury and Cartwright), Baptist working pastors
61 Cane Ridge, Kentucky Revival date
1801
61 Cane Ridge Kentucky
important revival of the Second Great Awakening. Became disconnected from sacramental occasions and became a camp meeting. Marked by excesses: preachers with zeal far in excess of their understanding. Some Presbyterians began to pull back and abandoned camp meetings, which became increasingly Methodist institutions.
61 Francis Asbury
traveled throughout America on horseback as Methodist circuit rider
61 Peter Cartwright
Methodist circuit rider of the Second Great Awakening who traveled throughout IL, KT, and TN leaving a trail of tall tales and repentant sinners
61 Baptist Frontier Pastors during the Second Great Awakening
generally farmers who preached on Sundays and worked the rest of the week in their fields. Often poorly educated – had no powerful organization like Methodists and Presbyterians but made up for it in pure zeal.
61 Second Great Awakening revival in the East
happened around the same time as Frontier revivals and centered first on the colleges. Preachers were often college presidents.
61 Timothy Dwight
grandson of Jonathan Edwards who became president of Yale during the Second Great Awakening.
61 Daniel Baker
student at Princeton in who led the revival in 1815 of the Second Great Awakening there. John Charles Hodge was one of those converted there.
61 Asahel Nettleton
one of the great preachers and evangelists in the North during the Second Great Awakening among the new England Congregationalists. Great at preaching the reformed faith in the revival context. Would remain at a church for several months giving personal attention to new Christians.
61 Charles Finney
lawyer turned evangelist who was probably the most famous of the revivalists during the Second Great Awakening. Brought shift toward revivalism. social reform. and Arminian theology
61 “New Measures”
Charles Finney’s organized plan for revival – people began to be able to plan and announce revivals. Finney thought that a preacher who new how to do it right could get a revival.
61 With his work, reformed and Calvinistic theology abandoned for an Arminian/pelagian theology
Charles Finney
61 Said of sinners during the Second Great Awakening “I call on them to make themselves a new heart!”
Charles Finney
61 Pushed social reform saying that Abolition, abstinence from alcohol, etc. should be immediate in the life of a Christian
Charles Finney
61 Results of the Second Great Awakening
Revivalism becomes the focus of American religious life, the Christianization of America (including the move away from creeds and confessions toward individualism, and the proliferation of Evangelical societies and para church organizations), and the decline of Calvinism (growth of Methodism, Baptist shift to Arminianism, and splits within Presbyterianism.)
61 Regardless of the bad things that are said about it, the Second Great Awakening may have
delayed the descent of paganism for several decades.
61 Time frame of Second Great Awakening
1790’s to 1840’s
61 What is the “Great Century” of missions?
19th century
62 Baptist shoemaker and lay preacher in the midlands of England
William Carey
William Carey dates
1761-1834
62 Carey’s vision, book, and sermon
wanted to see the English church involved in world mission, wrote Enquiry into the Obligation of Christians to use Means for the Conversion of the Heathen in 1792, in sermon said “Attempt great things for God
62 Great year in mission history for Great Britain and why
1792 – Carey's book and sermon, Baptist Missionary Society formed.
62 1792
important year in mission history for Great Britain
62 Baptist Missionary Society
mission board begun by Calvinistic Baptists to send Cary to India
62 “The Serampore Trio”
William Carey, Joshua Marshman, and William Ward
62 London Missionary Society started
a little after Baptist Missionary Society
62 London Missionary Society sent
David Livingstone, missionary explorer, to Africa
62 Church Missionary Society started in
1799 by Anglican evangelicals – sent out Henry Martyn (?), who was inspired by David Brainard’s journal.
63 Important Opposition to Slavery
Samuel Sewell and his tract, John Woolman and the Quakers, Jonathan Edwards Jr. and his preaching
63 Wrote The Selling of Joseph
Samuel Sewell – first tract against slavery in America
63 Quaker voice opposed to slavery
John Woolman
63 Preached that the Golden Rule provided enough evidence to condemn slavery
Jonathan Edwards, Jr.
63 Slave owners and evangelism
owners afraid that as slaves became Christian it would undermine the institution of slavery and require that slaves be set free, so they opposed the evangelization of slaves.
63 Three important stages in conversion of the slaves
The First Great Awakening, Slave Religion, and “The dawn of a new day” with the coming of the 19th century.
63 Slave preachers of the first great awakening
Samuel Davies and George Whitefield.
63 Slave religion grew in part out of
the preaching of George Whitfield in simple and straightforward terms
63 Different approaches to black ministry in the 19th century
White mission to blacks (Charles Jones and John Lafayette), Secret black slave church in south, Black Baptist churches in the south (George Liele, Andrew Bryan, and John Jasper)
63 Georgia slave owner who was Presbyterian missionary to slaves
Charles C. Jones
63 Spent his life trying to get people in the south concerned for ministry to the slaves
Charles C. Jones
63 Presbyterian who could speak Gullah dialect as he preached to the slaves
John Lafayette Giradeau
63 Began Zion Presbyterian Church in Charleston which in its day was the largest Presbyterian Church in the US
John Lafayette Giradeau
63 Both these men of the 19th century seemed to truly love the black man but not to see him as equal nor to fully see the problem with slavery itself
Jones and Giradeau
63 Converted at age 23 while hearing a sermon in the Baptist church of his master
George Liele
63 After being granted his freedom, founded the first African Baptist Church in Savannah
George Liele
63 After starting the first African Baptist Church in Savannah he moved to Jamaica to do missionary work in 1783 and started many churches there
George Liele
63 He was perhaps the first Protestant Missionary to go from the United States when he went to Jamaica to start churches
George Liele
63 Three famous early Black Baptist preachers
George Liele, Andrew Bryan, and John Jasper
63 Black Baptist churches vs. Black Methodist churches
Black Baptist churches began in the South and gradually spread to the North. Black Methodist churches began in the North and gradually spread to the South.
64 Richard Allen dates
1760-1831
64 Founder of the AME church who was one of the most important figures in 19th century black history
Richard Allen
64 Founder of the AME church, the first black denomination in America
Richard Allen
64 Founded by Richard Allen in 1816
the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the first black denomination in America
64 Born a slave and converted his own master through his preaching
Richard Allen
64 Church now known as “Old Mother Bethel”
first AME church in Philadelphia, started by Richard Allen
64 Richard Allen was ordained by
bishop Asbury in 1789
64 AME denomination organized in
1816
64 “Old Mother Bethel” started in
1794
64 The first black denomination in America
the African Methodist Episcopal Church, founded by Richard Allen in Philadelphia in 1816
65 New Side/ Old Side issue
The New Side/Old Side differences among Presbyterians focused primarily on their differing views of revivals in general and the Great Awakening (The First) in particular.
65 New Side View
(more Congregationalist than strict Presbyterian background) Revivals were a blessing
65 Old Side View
(more from a Scots Irish Presbyterian background) Higher view of church as an institution and trusted settled, ordained ministers more than revivals.
65 Old School/New School issue
occasioned by the Second Great Awakening. Focused on confessionalism.
65 New School View
defended the theology of the Second Great Awakening by arguing for a much broader view of the essentials of Westminster theology and a weaker view of commitments made to the Standards by officers of the Church. Also wanted to engage social issues.
65 Old School View
unease over theology of the Second Great Awakening and appalled by the emotional and behavioral excesses of its “new measures.” Saw “spirituality” of church’s mission as important above social issues.