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35 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What is Persuasion's Ugly Face?
Propganda and Indoctrination
Charles Lindblom's Perceptoral system? Disguised for?
System of social control through persuasion, disguised for coercion
Why is the process of "naming" political?
its classification, places it in a class
What is Indoctrination?
highly unilateral persuasive efforts that are intentially manipulative
What are procedural Rights?
right to have a decision that affects you made in a certain way
Negative Substantive rights?
right to do something free of restraint
Positive substantive rights?
actual action that promotes rights
first component of legal right
official statement
statutory law
is that body of law laid down by a legislature
administrative law
is that body of law laid down by a legislature
commons law
customs and usages rather than on codified written laws
second component of legal right
grievance process
third component
enforcement mechanism
What are policy actions
ongoing strategies for structuring relationships to achieve collective purposes
Multiplier effect
shaping behavior with out continuous and specific directions
what are ideal types
represent underlying theories about how to change people's behavior
what does Stone say about theoretical policy analysis?
its not flawless
how does the theory of inducements assume that the recievers are unitary actors?
not nec. an individual, but capable of making rational decisions
What is the positive view of rights?
claim backed by state
Normative view of rights?
people have right to something they don't actively claim
what are ideal types
represent underlying theories about how to change people's behavior
What do negative inducements cause?
conflict and build resentment
what does Stone say about theoretical policy analysis?
its not flawless
how does the theory of inducements assume that the recievers are unitary actors?
not nec. an individual, but capable of making rational decisions
What do positive inducements cause?
compromise and reciprocity
Why are rules necessary?
No society could support the number of officials necessary to secure that every citizen knows what to do
What is the positive view of rights?
claim backed by state
Normative view of rights?
people have right to something they don't actively claim
what are the political nature of rules?
they include and exclude by defining different treatment or permissive activities for different people.
What do negative inducements cause?
conflict and build resentment
What do positive inducements cause?
compromise and reciprocity
Reasons for valuing precise rules?
like cases will be treated alike

prevents officials from exercising improper power

provides predictability
Why are rules necessary?
No society could support the number of officials necessary to secure that every citizen knows what to do
what are the political nature of rules?
they include and exclude by defining different treatment or permissive activities for different people.
Reasons for valuing precise rules?
like cases will be treated alike

prevents officials from exercising improper power

provides predictability