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35 Cards in this Set

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Intelligence according to the book (just for giggles)
A fundamental faculty, the alteration or lack of which is of the utmost importance for practical life.
Steinberg's definition of intelligence
A capacity to learn from experience, using metacognitive processes to enhance learning and the ability to adapt to the surrounding environment which may require different adaptations within different social and cultural contexts.
The Binet-Simon test
A test used to assess a child's mental age to compare it to its chronological age.
It's the ancestor and the IQ test.
General intellignece (g)
The part of intelligence that is common to all abilities.
There is debate on whether there is a g or multiple intelligences.
Education (in the context of intelligence)
The ability to draw out the relationships that obtain in a novel situation.
It is believed to be the the underlying ability of g
(p.363)
Raven Progressive Matrices
A test of pattern completion. The most widely accepted test of g.
Working memory capacity theory
Working memory capacity and g are closely related.
Neural plasticity
A change in neuronal circuitry in time as a function of experience to adapt to the environment.
Thought to underlie g.
Dedicated intelligence
Domain-specific modules that have evolved to solve recurring problems.
Improvisational intelligence
Intelligence that deals with unpredictable problems. Important because it was the first distinction made between types of intelligence.
The Flynn Effect
An increase in IQ scores in industrialized countries over historical time.
Might be due to nutrition and health, education and environmental complexity.
Intellectual components
An elementary information process that operates on internal representations of objects or symbol.
Metacomponents
Executive processes used in planning, monitoring and decision making in task performance. (Component that controls the execution of other components)
Performance components
Processes used in the execution of a task.
Knowledge acquisition components
Processes concerned with learning new information and storing it in memory.
The Triarchic theory
Intelligent behaviour has 3 different content areas: analytical intelligence, creative intelligence and practical intelligence.
Analytical intelligence
(Triarchic theory) The ability to solve relatively straight forward problems; considered to be g.
Creative intelligence
The ability to reason using novel concepts.
Entrenched concepts vs. non-entrenched concepts
EC: Concepts that strike us as natural and easy to reason with.
NEC: Concepts that strike us as unnatural and difficult to reason with.
Practical intelligence
The ability to fin problem solutions tin real-world, everyday situations.
Ur-song hypothesis
There is a first song that all children spontaneously sing (like in Happy Feet)
Mid-life crisis of the musicians
As music students become adolescents, they may fell between a more explicit understanding of music and their earlier, spontaneous love of music.
Prodigies
Children who show an expert level of performance well before one would expect to observe it.
Chess experts
Chess players who perceive game position arrangements in larger units or chunks than do novices
10-year rule hypothesis
Roughly 10 year of intense practice is necessary in order to become an expert in a domain.
Creativity
The production of novel, socially valued product.
Problem-finding
The ability to discover new problems, their methods and solutions.
Blind variation and selective retention
The generation of alternative problem solutions without foresight, and the retention of those that work in a particular context.
Argument in favor of creativity as small-scale evolution.
4 Stages in the creative process
Preparation, incubation, illumination and verification.
Chance permutation
In problem-solving, the different combinations of mental elements not produced according to any set of rules.
Price's law hypothesis
Half of all contributions in a field will be made by the square root of the total number of workers in the field.
Creative potential
The ability to generate useful configurations (or stable and well organized combinations of mental elements) of ideas.
Alternate uses test
A test that requires the prtcpt to list 6 uncommon uses for common objects.
It's meant to measure creativity...
Flat hierarchies hypothesis
Creative people can think of many other things than the obvious ones with equal probabilities of retrieval.
Remote Associations Test (RAT (squeak))
Test that requires the person to come up with a single association to link three apparently unrelated words.