Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/7

Click to flip

7 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Eysenck Theory of Personality
Personality trait theory in which there are only three traits (P-E-N) 1. psychoticism, 2.extravertacism, 3. neuroticism.
Eysenck Theory of Personality
(Psychoticism)
High levels of this trait were believed by Eysenck to be linked to increased vulnerability to psychoses such as schizophrenia. He also believed that blood relatives of psychotics would show high levels of this trait, suggesting a genetic basic to the trait. Those who placed high in this trait were often artists, which shows alleged correlation between creativity and psychoticism.
Eysenck Theory of Personality
(Extraversion)
In the extroverted attitude the energy flow is outward, and the preferred focus is on people and things.
Eysenck Theory of Personality
(Neuroticism)
“disorders of sense and motion” caused by a “general affection of the nervous system.” The term (also psychoneurosis or neurotic disorder) in modern psychology refers to any mental disorder that, although may cause distress, does not interfere with rational thought or the persons' ability to function. This is in contrast to psychosis which refers to more severe disorders. Often associated with the reactions to phobias.
Eysenck Theory of Personality
(Zuckerman)
People vary widely in how much they enjoy ensation-seeking. One theory to account for this says that there are individual differences in optimal livel of arousal, requiring some people to seek more sensations to reach their optimal level. Zuckerman has proposed what he calls the monoamine oxidase theory, which says that people higher in sensation seeking tend to have higher levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine released in exciting situations.
Classical Conditioning
(Rayner and Watson)
Study of little albert, a child. Showed a a series of objects, which he initially never showed any fear to. He then was shown one of the images (white rat) while a steel bar behind him was struck with a hammer. After seven trials, the instant the rat was shown the baby began to cry. He then showed to be fearful of not only the rat, but also a rabbit, a dog, a seal-fur coat, and a santa claus mask. A fear response had been classically conditioned and generalized to other stimuli. Watson pointed out that the results demonstrated that not all anxiety was related to sex or unconscious conflicts, as he said that Freud claimed
Joseph Wolpe
Experiements with cats in cages being shocked, and their anxiety to the cages in general.
Developed systematic desensitization, a behavioral theropy used to overcome phobias and anxiety disorders. Reciprocal behaviors are reactions that compete with each other. If a reciprocal reaction can be evoked in a situation that usually elicits a different response, the old reaction can be weakened. Learning occurs as the new response grows stronger and the old response grows weaker. The act of eating can elicit reactions in animals that compete with and diminish the anxiety response. In humans, eating usually does not have this effect, but other behaviors do.