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32 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Non verbal encoding
non verbal expression of emotions
Stranger Anxiety
The caution and waridness display by infants when encountering an unfimiliar person.
Separation Anxiety
The distress displayed by infants when a customary care provider departs.
Social Smile
Smiling in response to other individuals.
Social Referencing
The intentional search for information about others' feelings to help explain the meaning of uncertain circumstances and events.
Self-awareness
Knowledge of oneself.
Theory of mind
Knowledge and beliefs about how the mind works and how it influences behavior.
Empathy
An emotional response that corresponds to the feelings of another person.
Attachment
The positive emotional bond that develops between a child and a particular individual.
Ainsworth Strange Situation
A sequence of staged episodes that illustrate the strength of attachment between a child and (typically) its mother.
Secure Attachment Pattern
A style of attachment in which children use the mother as a kind of home base and are at ease when is present; when gone they become upset until her return.
Avoidant Attachment Pattern
A style of attachment in which children do not seek promimity to the mother.
Ambivalent Attachment Pattern
A style of attachment in which children display a combination of positive and negative reactions to their mother.
Disorganized-disoriented Attachment Pattern
A style of attachment in which children show inconsistent, often contradictory behavior.
Interactional synchrony
Care giver and child match emotional states, more likely to produce secure attachment.
Mutual Regulation Model
The model which infants and parents learn to communicate emotional states to one another and to respond appropriately.
Reciprocal Socialization
A process in which infants' behavior invite further responses from parents and other caregivers, which in turn bring about further responses from the infants.
Personality
The sum total of the enduring characteristics that differentiate one individual from another.
Erikson's Theory of psychosocial development
The theory that considers how individuals come to understand themselves and the meaning of others'-and their own-behavior.
Trust-versus-Mistrust Stage
According to Erikson, the period during which infants develop a sense of trust or mistrust, largely depending on how there needs are met by the caregivers.
Secure Attachment Pattern
A style of attachment in which children use the mother as a kind of home base and are at ease when is present; when gone they become upset until her return.
Avoidant Attachment Pattern
A style of attachment in which children do not seek promimity to the mother.
Ambivalent Attachment Pattern
A style of attachment in which children display a combination of positive abd negative reactions to their mother.
Disorganized-disoriented Attachment Pattern
A style of attachment in which children show inconsistent, often contradictory behavior.
Interactional synchrony
Care giver and child match emotional states, more likely to produce secure attachment.
Autonomy Versus Shame and Doubt Stage
The period during which, according to Erikson, toddlers (age 18 months - 3 yrs) develop independence and autonomy if they are allowed the freedom to explore, or shame and self doubt if they are restricted and over protected.
Temperatment
Patterns of arousal and emotionality that are consistent and enduring characteristics of an individual.
Easy Baby
Babies who have a positive disposition; their body functions operates regularly, and they are adaptable.
Difficult Babies
Babies who have a negative moods and are slow to adapt to new situations; when confronted with new situations, they tend to withdraw.
Slow to Warm Babies
Babies who are inactive, relatively clam reactions to their environment; their moods are generally negative, and they withdraw from new situations, adapting slowly.
Goodness of Fit
The notion that development is dependent on the degree of match between children's temperament and the nature and demands of ther environment in which they are being raised.
Gender
The sense of being male or female.