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30 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
candid
(KAN did)
completely honest, straightforward

Candace's candidness overwhelmed her business partners who were not use to such honesty.
conjecture
(kun JEK chur)
inference, guesswork

At this point, Kimaya's hypothesis about single-cell biorhythms is still conjecture: she doesn't have conclusive evidence.
didactic
(die DAK tik)
instructive

The tapes were entertaining and didactic; they both amused and instructed.
euphemism
(YOO fuh miz um)
a mild indirect, or vague term substituting for a harsh, blunt, or offensive term

"To pass away" is an euphemism for dying.
extrapolate
(ek STRAP uh layt)
to infer or estimate by extending or projecting known information

Seeing the wrecked bike and his daughter's skinned knees, Heeath extrapolated that she had a biking accident.
incoherent
(in ko HAIR unt)
lacking cohesion or connection

Maury's sentences were so incoherent that nobody understood a word.
insinuate
(in SIN you ayt)
to introduce or communicate stealthily

Sean insinuated that Grace stole the arsenic, but he never came out and said it.
lucid
(LOO sid)
easily understood; clear

Our teacher provides lucid explanations of even the most difficult concepts so that we can all understand them.
rhetoric
(RET uh rik)
the art of using language effectively and persuasively

Since they are expected to make speeches, most politicians and lawyers are well-versed in the art of rhetoric.
acumen
(AK yoo men)
quickness, accuracy, and keeness of judgement or insight

Judge Akerman's legal acumen was so well regarded that he was nicknamed the "Solomon of the South."
adroit
(uh DROYT)
dexterous; deft

An adroit balloon-animal artist, Adrianna became popular at children's parties.
ascertain
(as er TAYN)
to find out, as through investigation or expreimentation

The private investigator had long suspected my dog; before long, he ascertained that Toro was indeed the murderer.
astute
(us STOOT)
shrewed; clever

Stewart is financially astute; he invests wisely and never falls for scams.
circumspect
(SER kum spekt)
careful; prudent; discreet

Ned's circumspect nammer makes him a wise appointment to the diplomatic corps.
disseminate
(dis SEM uh nayt)
to scatter widely, as in sowing seed

The news about Dave's embarrassing moment at the party disseminated quickly through the school; by the end of the day, everyone knew what had happened.
erudition
(er yuh DISH un)
deep, extensive learning

Professor Rudy's erudition was such that she could answer any question her students put to her.
husbandry
(HUZ bun dree)
the application fo scientific princples to agriculture. expecially to animal breeding

After years of practicing animal husbandry, Marsha's husband was able to create a breed of dog that actually walked itself.
pedantic
(puh DAN tik)
excessively concerned with book learning and formal rules

Pedro's pedantic tendencies prompted him to remind us constatly of all the grammatical rules we were breaking.
perspicacious
(per spih KAY shus)
shrewd; clear-sighted
Persephone's perspicacious mind had solved so many cases that the popular private investigator was able to retire.
pragmatic
(prag MAT ik)
practical

Never one for wild and unrealistic schemes, Matt took a pragmatic approach to research.
precocious
(pre KO shus)
exhibiting unusually early intellectual aptitude or maturity

Bobby Fisher's precocious intellect made him one of the world's best chess players before he could even drive.
prospectus
(pro SPEK tus)
formal proposal

Before writing my thesis, I had to submit a detailed prospectus to the department for approval.
rudimentary
(roo duh MEN tuh ree)
basic; elementary; in the earliest stages of development

Josh's rudimentary golf skills were easily overpowered by Tiger Woods' amazing performance on the green.
abstruse
(ab STROOS)
difficult to understand

Abby found her prefessor's lecture on non-Euclidian geometry abstruse; she doubted anyone else in the class understood it either.
callous
(KAL us)
emtionally hardened; unfeeling

Callie's callous remark about her friend's cluttered room really hurt his feelings.
convoluted
(kon vo LOO tid)
intricate; complex

The directions were so convoluted that we became hopelessly lost.
enigma
(en IG ma)
a puzzle, mystery, or riddle

The emu was an enigma; you could never tell what it was thinking.
inscrutable
(in SKROOT uh bul)
difficult to fathom or understand; impenetrable

The ancient poet's handwriting was so inscrutable, that even the most prominent Latin scholars could not read the manuscript.
reticent
(RET uh sint)
inclined to keep silent; reserved

Rosanna's reticent behavior caused the interviewer to think her incapable of conversing with other students.
staid
(STAYD)
unemotional; serious

Mr. Estado was well known for his staid demeanor; he stayed calm even when everyone else celebrated the team's amazing victory.