Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/82

Click to flip

82 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Of poetry that is a direct, often songlike expression. Also expresses feelings and emotions.
lyric
Words with two unstressed rhyming syllables.
double feminine rhymes
A five line stanza.
cinquain
A stanza consisting of four lines with the first and third lines unrhymed iambic tetrameters and the second and fourth lines rhymed imabic trimeters.
ballad
Consists of three quatrains and a climatic couplet with a new rhyme. Its typical rhyme scheme is a-b-a-b-c-d-d-c-e-f-e-f-g-g.
Shakespearean sonnet or English sonnet
A figure of speech in which an address is made to an absent or deceased person or a personified thing rhetorically.
apostrophe
The intentional use of a word or expression figuratively, i.e., used in a different sense from its original significance in order to give vividness or emphasis to an idea.
trope
A figure of speech in which a part of something stands for the whole or the whole for a part.
synecdoche
A figure of speech involving the substitution of one noun for another of which it is an attribute or which is closely associated with it. Is very similar to synecdoche.
metonymy
The repetition of similiar vowel sounds.
assonance
The unit of measurement in poetry
foot
To mark off lines of poetry into rhythmic units, or feet and to provide a visual representation of their metrical structure.
scanning
A two-syllable foot, the first syllable unstressed, the second stressed.
iamb
A two-syllable foot with the first syllable stressed, the second unstresed.
trochee
A three-syllable foot with two unstressed syllables followed by a stressed syllable.
anapest
A three-syllable foot composed of a stressed syllable and two unstressed ones.
dactyl
A line of a single foot.
monometer
Two-foot lines
dimeter
Three-foot lines
trimeter
Four-foot lines
tetrameter
Five-foot lines
pentameter
Six-foot lines; also called alexadrines
hexameter
A two-syllable foot consisting of two equally stressed syllables.
spondee
A division of a poem consisting of a series of lines arranged together in a usually recurring pattern of meter and rhyme.
stanza
The most easily recognized characteristic of poetry.
rhyme
A poem that consists of four lines , or four lines of a poem that can be considered as a unit.
quatrain
A pause or break within a line of poetry.
caesura
Poetry that does not conform to a regular meter or rhyme scheme.
free verse
Six lines of poetry especially the last six lines of an italian sonnet.
sestet
An eight line poem of the first eight lines of an italian sonnet.
octave
Refers to rhyming words at the ends of line.
end rhyme
When an individual line of poetry contains two or more words that rhyme.
internal rhyme
Poetry written in unrhymed iambic pentameter.
blank verse
A speaker or writer's choice of words.
diction
Rhymes that end with accented syllables.
masculine rhyme
Rhymes that end in unstressed syllables.
feminine rhyme
A group of three lines that often rhyme; also called terza rima
tercet
A group of five lines of verse.
quintet
Lines that come in pairs that often rhyme.
couplet
Sounds that are close but not exact duplicates of each other are called _________, ___________, and __________.
slant, off, and near rhymes
Intellectual/henpecked you all is an example of ___________ rhyme.
triple
Mephistopheles/with the most awful ease is an example of _____________ rhyme.
quadruple
The pattern of rhymimg words within a given stanza or poem.
rhyme scheme
Words that virtually replicate sounds that poets use to create vivid effects.
onomatopoeia
The repetition of initial sounds in words and syllables.
alliteration
The repetition of consonants appearing within a line or at the end of words. Sometimes goes by the name dissonance, half rhyme, and oblique rhyme.
consonance
May consist of two syllable or three syllables and have names based on the order in which they appear.
feet
Seven-foot lines
heptameter
Eight-foot lines
octameter
The most widely employed rhythmic pattern.
iambic pentameter
Unstressed syllables omitted for the sake of meter.
elisions
Indicated by an absence of punctuation and eliminates the need to pause. Also called run-on,
enjambment
A figurative language in which resemblances between disparate things are implied.
metaphors
A figurative languafe that uses like or as to make comparisons.
simile
A single metaphor developed at length.
extended metaphor
Usages that leap to two or more illogical, inconsistent, often grotesque resemblances.
Mixed metaphors
A figure of speech that communicates a second meaning along with its literal meaning.
symbol
Word and phrases that refer to something that can be seen, heard, tasted, smelled, or touched.
image
Occurs when the poet assigns human characteristic to a nonhuman object or to an abstraction such as love, death, envy, victory, and so on.
personification
A historical,literary, or cultural reference to a person, place, or event.
allusion
A story or vignette that, like a metaphor has both literal and figurative meaning.
allegory
A phrase that seems self-contradictory or incompatible with reality
oxymoron
An apparently self-contradictory statement that under scrutiny makes perfect sense.
paradox
Saying less than one means or using restraint in ironic contrast to what might be said.
understatement
A form of understatement in which a positive fact is stated by denying a negative one.
litotes
An exaggeration, a useful device for poets to intensify emotions, values, physical features, the weather, or virtually anything.
hyberbole or overstatement
A story that adheres to no prescribed form; its purpose is to tell a tale.
narrative poem
Poetry that describes the lyric poems of certain 17th-century men who were fond of writing highly intellectual and philosophical verses on the nature of thought and feeling.
metaphysical poetry
Love poems, verses that declare poets' feelings for their sweethearts.
romantic poetry
Used in epics or heroic poetry. Expressed a complete thpught, with the 2nd line reinforcing the 1st.
heroic couplets
The completeness of a heroic couplet is said to be _________________.
closed or end-stopped
A poem spoken by one person to a listener who may influence the speaker with a look or an action, but says nothing.
dramatic monologue
An poem of mouring and meditation, usually about the death of a person but occasionally about other losses. Sometimes called dirge.
elegy
Follows this pattern: strophe, antistrophe, and epode.
Pindaric ode
Odes that don't necessary folloe the order of the Pindaric odes.
irregular odes
Adheres to the rhyme scheme of the Italian sonnet but ignores the customary break between the octave and sestet.
Miltonian sonnet
A 19 line poem with five 3-line stanzas and a concluding quatrain.
villanelle
Patterns of rhythm in poetry are based on _________.
meter
The process of analyzing meter
scansion
An ancient form of poetic song; a celebratory poem.
ode
Fourteen line lyric poems expressing one main thought or sentiment in iambic pentameter.
sonnet
A sonnet divided into two discreten units: sestet and octave with the remaining lines commonly but not always rhymed c-d-c-d-c-d or c-d-e-c-d-e.
Italian sonnet