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9 Cards in this Set

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What happens to the boiling and the freezing point, when a solid solute is added to a liquid solvent? And what is this dependent upon?
the boiling point increases, while the freezing point decreases, and these factors are dependent upon the amount of solute
What is the formula for boiling point elevavtion, and what do the variables stand for
T=kb x m x i

kb= boiling point elevation constant
m= molality
i= number of dissolved particles produced by each molecule of solute
What is the formula for freezing point depression, and what do the varibales stand for
T= kf x m x i

kf= freezing point depression constant
m= molality
i= number of dissolved particles produced by each molecule of solute
In order to make inferences about compounds based on the vapor pressure what do you have to remember
-that its more diffiuclt for surface liquids to evaporate if the liquid has strong bonds to hold it back

-if vapor pressure is high; intermolecular forces are weak

-once you know that you can make inferences about the BP, heat of fusion and heat of vaporization

-when the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the surrounding atmospheric pressure, the liquid boils
If you add some solid solute to any solution what would happen to the vapor pressure and why?
the vapor pressure would decrease, beacuase the solute that has been added takes up surface area at the exposed part of the liquid, which means less solvent can evaporate
If you were to heat up the solution what would happen to the vapor pressure and why
the vapor pressure would increase, beacsue the heat encourages more of the surface liquid to evaporate
If a liquid has high vapor pressure what is it called, abd why?
it means its volatile and it readily evaporates, like rubbing alcohol

-this happens when the intermolecular forces of a liquid are not strong
When is you add solid solute to a solution, what happens to the vapor pressure, BP, and FP
-Vapor pressure: is lowered
-Boiling Point: raised
-Freezing Point: lowered
What is the equation for raoults law?
-it is used with liquid solutes

-P(total)= X(solvent)P(solvent) + X(solute)P(solute)

-Solutions with negative heats of solution tend to have a negtive deviation from rauolts law (the actual vapor pressure will be less that that given by the equation

-Solutions with positive heats of solution tend to have a positive deviation from raoults law (the actual vpaor pressure will be greater then that given by the equation)