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53 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
Drug
is a substance intended for the use in the diagnosis, cure, treatment or prevention or disease in human beings or animals
Legend Drugs
require a prescription and are not considered safe without medical supervision
OTC (Over The Counter)
does not require a prescription and are considered safe without medical supervision
Prescription
is an order for a medication or medical device, issued by a licensed prescriber
Dispensing directions
name, strength, dosage form, quantity and directions for use
Generic Name
a contraction of the chemical name, sometimes indicating the chemical class to which the drug belongs to and is properly referred to as its nonproprietary name
Chemical Name
describes the structure of the drug by standard chemical nomenclature
Label Requirements
referred to as “dispensing labels”
Auxiliary Labels
small labels that provide additional information, warnings, or reminders, that are affixed to the prescription container
Patient Medication Profile
a listing of all medications dispensed by the pharmacy to a particular patient
Physicians Order Sheets
sheet where physicians orders for hospital inpatients or nursing home residents are written on
Repackaging Log
a record of all activities related to the repackaging process and must be maintained
Dosage Form
refers to the physical form in which the drug product is made available for administration to the patient
Tablets
solid dosage forms prepared by mechanical compression in a tableting machine
Chewable Tablets
compressed tablets that are designed to be chewed or dissolved
Enteric-Coated Tablets
compressed tablets coated with a special substance to prevent the dissolution within the stomach
Sublingual Tablets
tablets you keep placed under your tongue so it is promptly absorbed into the blood stream
Buccal Tablets
tablets you keep between your gum and cheek so dissolves slowly over a period of time
Film-Coated Tablets
coated with a thin layer of water-soluble material that masks the objectionable odor or taste of certain medications
Sustained, Time-Released Tablets
this is a tablet that is released at a constant rate for a prolonged period of time (8-24 hours) and are referred to as “long acting”, “delayed-release”, “prolonged-action”
Lozenges
dissolve slowly to keep the drug in contact with the mouth or throat for a prolonged period of time and are referred to as “troches or pastilles”
Pellets
small cylindrically shaped tablets meant for implantation subcutaneously (just under the skip) for prolonged continuous drug absorption
Capsules
a drug that is enclosed within a soft or hard gelatin shell that dissolves and the drug is released
Effervescent Tablets
tablets containing sodium bicarbonate with either citric or tartaric acid
Solutions
mixtures containing one more soluble ingredient (solute) dissolved usually in water (solvent), in which the molecules of solute are uniformly dispersed among those of the solvent
Syrups
sweet, viscous, concentrated, aqueous solutions of sugar that is used as a vehicle for antibiotics, antihistamines, antitussives (cough preparations) and vitamins as well as for other drugs
Elixirs
sweetened hydroalcoholis (water and alcohol) solutions and are probably the most widely used
Because of their pleasant taste, relative stability and ease of preparation
Tinctures
alcoholic or hydro alcoholic solutions prepared from vegetable, animal or chemical materials
Suspensions
preparations containing insoluble medical products dispersed in a liquid
Emulsions
preparations containing either water dispersed in oil (w/o) or oil dispersed in water (o/w) stabilized with the acid of an “emulsifying agent”
Microemulsion or Transparent Emulsion
the particle size of the inner phase is 0.05 microns or less
Ointments
semisolid preparations used for external application to skin or mucous membranes
Pastes
ointment-like preparations for external application
Creams
semisolid emulsions, containing suspensions or solutions of medicinal agents intended for external application
Powders
finely divided, relatively dry, solid material intended for external application
Gels and Jellies
two phase systems consisting of a solid internal phase diffused through out a viscous liquid phase
Transdermal Patches
patches applied to the skin formulated to deliver a constant, controlled-dose of a medication through the skin and into the bloodstream
Ophthalmic Drops
sterile solutions that are instilled into the eye in the form of an “eye drop”
Ophthalmic Ointments
sterile emulsions, properly formulated for application into the eye
Medicated Contact Lenses
sterile contact lenses, pre-soaked with medication, inserted into the eye
Ocular Inserts
drug pre-soaked inserts places in the lower eye sac between the sclera (white of the eye) and the eyelid
Suppositories
solid dosage forms for insertion into the rectum, vaginal cavity, or urethral tract
Inhalers
solutions or suspensions of solid or liquid particles in gas or air intended for inhalation via nose or mouth
Otic Product
solutions suspensions instilled into the ear canal
Enemas
liquid medications introduced into the rectum via a bulb syringe
Douches
aqueous solutions which are directed into the cavity of the body
Unit Dose Drug Distribution
allows for less preparation time for nursing to administer medications and increase the time for direct patient care
Medical Administration Records
are provided by pharmacy to each nursing unit which allows for a coordinated and verifiable means of drug distribution
Centralized unit dose system
where the majority of medications are prepared and dispensed from one central location
Decentralized Unit Dose System
where one or more “satellite” pharmacies are dispersed throughout the institution
Coding
refers to the notation on the medication order by a pharmacist or pharmacy technician of the name, strength and dosage form of the medication prepared for the patient
Automatic Stop Order
those medications that have a predesignated duration of therapy and must be discontinued if the physician has not ordered them and are determined by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee
Expiration date
the last date of the sale as determined by the manufacturer