Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/29

Click to flip

29 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What is a dysrhythmia?
Any deviation from the normal rhythm of the heart.
What is an antidysrhythmic?
A drug used for the treatment and prevention of disturbances in cardiac rhythm.
Explain charges in respect to the cardiac cell...
...Inside the cardiac cell there is a net negative charge relative to the outside of the cell
What is the Resting Membrane Potential (RMP)?
The difference in the electronegative charge.

It results from an uneven distribution of ions (Na, K, Ca) across the cell membrane.
How is this distribution of ions maintained?
An energy-requiring pump (the sodium-potassium ATPase pump) is needed.
What is Action Potential?
When a change in the distribution of ions causes cardiac cells to become excited.
What does Action Potential do?
The movement of ions across the cc's membrane results in the propagation of an electrical impulse.
What is the result of Action Potential?
This electrical impulse leads to contraction of the myocardial muscle.
What is Action Potential?
When a change in the distribution of ions causes cardiac cells to become excited.
What is the Vaughan Williams Classification?
A system commonly used to classify antidysrhythmic drugs.
What does Action Potential do?
The movement of ions across the cc's membrane results in the propagation of an electrical impulse.
What is Class I?
-Membrane-stabilizing agents
-Fast sodium channel blockers
-Divided into Ia, Ib, and Ic agents, according to effects
What is an example of a class I and it's characteristics?
Class I moricizine
-General Class I agent
-Has characteristics of all three subclasses
-Used for symptomatic ventricular and life-threatening dysrhythmias
What is an example of a class Ia and it's characteristics?
Class Ia quinidine, procainamide, disopyramide
-Block sodium channels
-DELAY repolarization
-INCREASE the APD
-Used for a-fib, premature atrial cont., premature vent. cont., v-tach, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome
What is an example of a class Ib and it's characteristics?
Class Ib tocainide, mexiletine, phenoytoin, lidocaine
-Block sodium channels
-ACCELERATE repolarization
-DECREASE the APD
-Used for ventricular dysrhythmias only
What is an example of a class Ic and it's characteristics?
-Block sodium channels
-Little effect on APD repol.
-Used for SEVERE vent. dysrhythmias
-May be used in a-fib/flutter
Class II examples and effects
Class II Beta blockers: atenolol, esmolol, petaprolol, propranolol
-Reduce or block sympathetic NS stim., reduce trans. of impulses
-Depress phase 4 depolarization
-General myocardial depressants for both supraventricular and vent. dys.
Class III examples and effects
Class III amiodarone, dretylium, sotalol, ibutilide
-Increase APD
-Prolong repolarization in phase 3
-Dysrhythmias that are difficult
-Life-threatening v-tach or fib, a-fib/flutter - resistant to other drugs
-Sustained v-tach
Class IV examples and effects
-Calcium channel blockers
-Depress phase 4 depolarization
-Paroxysmal supraventricular tach rate control for a-fib/flutter
Other Antidysrhythmics
Digoxin, adenosine
-Have properties of several classes and aren't placed into one class
Digoxin does what...
-Cardiac glycoside
-Inhibits Na-K ATPase pump
- + inotrope, improves the strength of cardiac cont.
Digoxin (2)...
-allows more Ca to be available for contraction
-Used for CHF and atrial dysrhythmias
-Monitor K levels, drug levels, and for toxicity
adenosine (Adenocard)...
-Slows conduction through the AV node
-Used to convert paroxysmal supraventricular tach to sinus rhythm
-Very short half-life
adenosine (Adenocard) (2)...
-Only administered as fast IV push
-May cause asystole for a few seconds
-Other side effects minimal
ALL antidysrhythmics can cause dysthythmias!!!
Hypersensitivity rxns...
...nausea
-vomiting
-diarrhea
-dizziness
-blurred vision
-headache
Antidysrhythmics:
Nursing implications
-Obtain a thorough drug and medical history
-Measure baseline BP, P, I&O, and cardiac rhythm
-Measure serum K level before initiating therapy
Antidysrhythmics:
Nursing Implications (2)
-Assess for conditions that may be contraindications for use of specific agents
-Assess for potential drug interactions
-Instruct patients regarding dosing sched. and side effect
Antidysrhythmics:
Nursing Implications (3)
-During therapy monitor cardiac rhythm, HR, BP, well-being, color, temp, heart and breath sounds.
-Assess plasma drug levels
-Class I - monitor ECG for QT intervals prolonged more than 50%
Antidysrhythmics:
Monitor for theraputic response...
-DECREASED BP in hypertensive
-DECREASED edema
-Regular PR or improved reg.