Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/30

Click to flip

30 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Fasciculations are findings of impairment to...
motor neuron integrity
Autonomic Neuropathy gives rise to
orthostatic htn
trophic skin changes
arrhythmias
pupillary changes
GI motility dysfunction
impotency
What are the pathological processses of peripheral neuropathy?
Wallerian Degeneration
Axonal Degeneration
Neuronopathy
Segmental Demyelination
What is Wallerian Degeneration?
Transected nerve due to trauma. The distal end dies off.
What is the most common cause of PN in the US?
Diabetic PN
What is the accepted pathophys of Diabetic PN?
Hyperglycemia-->accumulation of sorbitol-->free radicals-->nerve damage
What is the most common subtype of DN?
Polyneuropathy
What are the characteristics of Diabetic Polyneuropathy?
Stocking/Glove pattern
Predominantly sensory
Axonal Neuropathy
In D. PolyN, which is affected first:

1) sensory/motor
2) short nerves/long nerves
1) sensory
2) long nerves
What is Diabetic Amyotrohpy?
Damage to a bundle of nerves with u/k cause. Usu. lumbar plexus.
Fasciculations are findings of impairment to...
motor neuron integrity
Autonomic Neuropathy gives rise to
orthostatic htn
trophic skin changes
arrhythmias
pupillary changes
GI motility dysfunction
impotency
What are the pathological processses of peripheral neuropathy?
Wallerian Degeneration
Axonal Degeneration
Neuronopathy
Segmental Demyelination
What is Wallerian Degeneration?
Transected nerve due to trauma. The distal end dies off.
What is the most common cause of PN in the US?
Diabetic PN
What is the accepted pathophys of Diabetic PN?
Hyperglycemia-->accumulation of sorbitol-->free radicals-->nerve damage
What is the most common subtype of DN?
Polyneuropathy
What are the characteristics of Diabetic Polyneuropathy?
Stocking/Glove pattern
Predominantly sensory
Axonal Neuropathy
In D. PolyN, which is affected first:

1) sensory/motor
2) short nerves/long nerves
1) sensory
2) long nerves
What is Diabetic Amyotrohpy?
Damage to a bundle of nerves with u/k cause. Usu. lumbar plexus.
How does diabetic amyotrophy present?
severe pain in hip, low back, and ant. thigh
high protein in CSF (due to protein release from N damage)
What are other systemic causes of PN?
Renal Failure
Hepatic d/o
Thyroid d/o
vascular/rheumatologic
Critical illness
neoplasm (compression)
porphyria (abnl heme synthesis)
What is Guillain Barre Syndrome?
Immune attack on the nerves and nerve roots
What is the most common acquired demyelinating polyneuropathy?
GBS
The myelin protein that is attacked by Abs in GBS is

1) ?
2) similar to the moiety on what bac?
1)GMI
2) Campylobacter
What part of the NMJ do the GMI Abs attack?
The pre-synaptic end plate
What is the presentation of GBS?
Facial weakness
Autonomic N abnormalities: dysrhythmias, hemodynamic abnlities
Areflexia
High CSF protein
What is the main hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy?
Charcot-Marie-Tooth
Type 1 CMT affects axon or myelin?
Type 2 CMT affects axon or myelin?
Type 1: myelin
Type 2: axon
What are the clinical features of CMT?
Distal weakness
Atrophy
MSK deformities
Hammer toes