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61 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What is a first degree strain?

page 154
Considered mild.
Pain during isometric contraction.
Inflammation.
No bleeding.
What is a second degree strain?

page 154
Considered moderate.
Pain upon palpation.
Hemorrhaging and tearing.
What is a third degree strain?

page 154
Considered severe.
100% tearing of tendon from muscle or bone.
Strains are associated with Tendons or Ligaments?

page 154
Tendons
Sprains are associated with Tendons or Ligaments?

page 154
Ligaments
What is a first degree sprain?

page 154
Minor tearing of ligaments.
No abnormal loss of R.O.M.
What is a second degree sprain?

page 154
Partial tearing of ligament.
Pain with passive movements.
What is a third degree sprain?

page 154
Complete tear.
What is Osteoarthritis?

page 155
Non inflammatory degeneration of articular cartilage.
What is subluxation?

page 155
An incomplete or partial dislocation.
What is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

page 156
Slow, chronic and progressive inflammatory disease that principaly affects the joints.
What is Gout?

page 157
Disease where increased serum uric acid levels cause urate crystals to be deposited in joints and kidneys.
What is a common cause of gout?

page 157
High protein diets
What is tendonitis?

page 157
Inflammation of the tendon, commonly at the insertion.
What is Golfer's elbow?

page 157
Inflammation of the tendons at the medial epichondyl of the humerus.
What is Tennis elbow?

page 157
Inflammation of the tendons at the lateral epichondyl of the humerous.
What is Tenosynovitis?

page 157
Inflammation of the tendon sheath.
Where are common names for the two most common places that tenosynovitis can occur?

page 157
Carpal Tunnel & Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome.
(Ankles & Wrists)
What is Osgood Schlatter Disease?

page 158
Tender and swollen tibial tuberosity occuring in atheletic adolescents.
What is a good treatment plan for someone with Osgood Schlatter disease?

page 158
Working the quads.
What is Plantar fasciitis?

page 158
Micro tears in the plantar fascia in the medial calcaneous or mid foot.
What is scoliosis?

page 161
A lateral and/or spiraling curvature of the spine.
Spine may be flexible and reactive or fixed and structural.
What is Kyphosis?

page 161
Excessive posterior curve of the thoracic spine.
What is Lordosis?

page 161
An exaggerated cervical or lumbar curve.
What is Gibbous?

page 161
A humpback (C-7 protrusion)
Ture or False: Low back pain is a disease?

page 162
False.
It is a symptom.
What is back pain caused by poor blood flow?

page 162
Vascular Back Pain
What is back pain caused by disc herniation?

page 162
Neurogenic Back Pain
What is back pain caused by organ related pathology?

page 162
Viscerogenic Back Pain
What is back pain that is considered "in your head"?

page 162
Psychogenic Back Pain
What is back pain caused by disc degeneration?

page 162
Spondylogenic Back Pain
What is Radicular pain?

page 162
Pain that radiates down the legs.
What is acute herniation?

page 163
Displaced disc compresses nerve root causing sensory and motor deficits. Often results in sciatica.
What is spinal stenosis?

page 163
Pain brought on by prolonged standing or walking - neurogenic claudication.
What is Spondylolisthesis?

page 163
Forward displacement of one vertebrae over another, usually L5 over S1.
What is Ankylosis?

page 163
Bony fusion of the joints resulting in joint immobility.
What is Genu Valgum and what muscles can be treated to affect this condition?

page 146
Knock knees.
Lengthen adductors.
What is Genu Varum and what muscles can be treated to affect this condition?

page 146
Bowed legs.
Lateral thigh muscles, including glutes & biceps femoris.
What causes Genu Valgum and Genu Varum?

page 146
Asymmetric Cartilage Growth
What is the condition when the medial longitudinal arch is missing?

page 146
Flat foot
What are two types of flat feet?

page 146
Flexible: Medial arch is restored during plantar flexion.

Rigid: Medial arch is NOT restored during plantar flexion.
What is Paget's Disease?

page 147
Thickening and disorganization of bone architecture.
What is the condition that is a result of too much collagen, not enough minerals in the bone?

page 147
Osteomalacia
What condition is a result of a vitamin D deficiency?

page 147
Rickets
At what age range are bones typically their strongest?

page 148
25-28
What condition is characterized by a loss of bone mass?

page 148
Osteoporosis
How many deaths per year are linked to osteoporosis?

page 148
100,000
What are Stress fractures?

page 151
Accumulation of stress induced micro-fractures which eventually fracture through the compact bone.
Where are the top 4 locations for stress fractures?

page 151
Tibia
Fibula
Metatarsals
Head of Femur
What is Osteochondroma?

page 151
Tumor of bone cartilage
What type of fracture exhibits bone protruding through skin?

page 150
Open
What type of fracture exhibits bone that does not protrude through skin?

page 150
Closed
What type of fracture exhibits bone move out of its normal position?

page 150
Displacement
What type of fracture occurs as a result of another bone diseasze?

page 150
Pathologic
What condition is recognized by blue pus forming at the corner of the eyes?

page 149
Osteomyelitis
What age related factors affect osteoporosis?

page 148
Osteoclasts remain active as one ages, while osteoblasts slow down. Thus new bone formation occurs slower than bone breakdown.
What physical activity factors affect osteoporosis?

page 148
As activity increases, so does bone mass.
What genetic factor affects osteoporosis?

page 148
Not born with enough vitamin D receptors.
What nutrition related factors affect osteoporosis?

page 148
Increased calcium increases bone mass.
Increased vitamin D increases calcium absorption
What hormonal related factors affect osteoporosis?

page 148
Thyroid (controls calcium uptake into bones)
Parathyroid (controls calcium release into blood)
What condition is a result of too much hydroxyapetite and not enough collagen in bone?

page 147
Osteopetrosis