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98 Cards in this Set

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obbligato
an instruemtnal part, typically distinctive in effect, that is integral to a piece of music and should not be omitted in performance

such a part played to accompany another instrumental or vocal part
obelisk
stone pillar

mountain, tree, or other natural object of similar shape

another term for "obelus"
obelus
the cross symbol used as a reference mark in printed matter, or to indicate that a person is deceased (also called "dagger")

a mark used in ancient texts to indicate a word or passage as spurious, corrupt, or doubtful
objectivism
(philosophy) the belief that certain things, esp moral truths, exist independently of human knowledge or perception of them
objet
an object displayed or intended for display as an ornament
objet d'art
a small decorative or artistic object, typically when regarded as a collectible item
objurgate
rebuke severely; scold
oblate
a person dedicated to monastic or religious life or work

(of a spheroid) flattened at the poles
oblation
a thing presented or offered to God or a god.

the presentation of bread and wine to God in the Eucharist
oblique
neither parallel nor at a right angle to a specified or implied line; slanting

not explicit or diret in addressing a point
obloquy
strong public criticism or verbal abuse

a disgrace, esp that brought about by public abuse
obsequies
funeral rites
obsequious
obedient or attentive to an excessive or servile degree
obstetrics
the branch of medicine and surgery concerned w/ childbirth and the care of women giving birth
obstreperous
noisy and difficult to control
obverse
the side of a coin or medal bearing the head or principal design

the design or inscription of this side

the opposite or counter part of a fact or truth: "true solitude is the obverse of true society"
obvert
(in logic) alter a proposition so as to infer another proposition w/ a contradictory predicate, e.g. "no men are immortal" to "all men are mortal"
occlude
stop, close up, or obstruct (an opening, orifice, or passage)
occult
supernatural, mystical, or magical beliefs

esoteric; communicated only to the initiated
ochlocracy
government by a mob; mob rule
oculist
optometrist
odeum
(esp in ancient Greece or Rome) a building used for musical performances
odious
extremely unpleasant; hateful; repulsive
odium
general or widespread hatred or disgust directed toward someone, often as a result of his or her actions

disgrace over something hated or shameful; opprobrium
odyssey
a Greek epic poem traditionally ascribed to Homer, describing the travels of Odysseus (Roman: Ulysses) during hs ten years of wandering after the fall of Troy. He eventually returned home to Ithaca and killed the suitors who had plagued his wife Penelope during his absence.

any long, adventerous journey

an extended process of development or change
oenophile
a connoisseur of wines
oeuvre
the works of a painter, composer, or author regarded collectively

a work of art, music, or literature
ofay
an offensive term for a white person, used by black ppl
offal
the entrails and internal organs of an animal used as food

refuse or waste material

decomposing animal flesh
ogee
(in architecture) having a double continuous S-shaped curve
ogive
a pointed or Gothic arch

one of the diagonal groins or ribs of a vault

a thing having the profile of an ogive, esp. the head of a projectile or the nose cone of a rocket
Old English
the language of the Anglo-Saxons (up to about 1150), a highly inflected language w/ a largely Germanic vocabulary, very diff't from modern English; also called Anglo-Saxon
oleaginous
rich in, covered w/, or producing oil; oily or greasy

exaggeratedly and distastefully complimentary; obsequious
oligarchy
a small group of ppl having control of a country, organization, or institution
oligopoly
a state of limited competition, in which a market is shared by a small number of producers or sellers
olio
a highly spiced stew of various meats and vegetables, of Spanish and Portuguese origin

a miscellaneous collection of things

a variety act or show
ombudsman
an official appointed to investiage individuals' complaints against maladministration, esp that of public authorities
omega
the twenty fourth, and last, letter of the Greek alphabet (looks like a horseshoe)

the last of a series; the final development
omnibus
a volume containing several novels or other items previously published separately

formerly, a bus
omnicompetent
able to deal w/ all matters or solve all problems
omphalos
the center or hub of something

a sounded stone (esp that at Delphi) representing the navel of the earth in ancient Greek mythology
onanism
masturbation

coitus interruptus
oncology
the study and treatment of tumors
oneiric
of or relating to dreams or dreaming
oneiromancy
the interpretation of dreams in order to foretell the future
onerous
involving an amount of effort and difficulty that is oppressively burdensome

(in law) involving excessively heavy obligations
onomasiology
the branch of knowledge that deals w/ terminology, in particular contrasting terms w/ similar concepts
ontic
(in philosophy) of or relating to entities and the facts about them; relating to real as opposed to phenomenal existence
ontogeny
the branch of biology that deals w/ ontogenesis (the development of an individual organism or anatomical or behavioral feature from the earliest stage to maturity)
ontology
the branch of metaphysics dealing w/ the nature of being
onus
a burden; one's duty or responsibility
op art
a form of abstract art that gives the illusion of movement by the precise use of pattern and color, or in which conflicting patterns emerge and overlap
operatic
excessively theatrical; overly dramatic
operose
involving or displaying much industry or effort
opine
hold and state as one's opinion
opprobrious
(of language) expressing opprobrium

disgraceful; shameful
opprobrium
a harsh criticism or censure

the public disgrace arising from someone's shameful conduct
optimism
(in philosophy) the doctrine, esp as set forth by G.W. Leibniz (1646-1716) that this world is the best of all possible worlds

the belief that good must ultimately prevail over evil in the universe
opulent
wealthy; ostentatiously rich and luxurious or lavish
opus
(in music) a separate composition or set of compositions by a particular composer, usually by date of publication

any artistic work, esp one on a grand scale
oratorio
a large-scale musical work for orchestra and voices, typically a narrative on a religious theme, performed w/o the use of costumes, scenery or action.
oratory
a small chapel, esp for private worship

exaggerated, eloquent, or highly colored language

the art or practice of formal speaking in public
orbicular
having the shape of a flat ring or disk

having a rounded convex or golbular shape
ordinal
any of the positive whole numbers defining a thing's position in a series
ordnance
mounted guns; artillery

military weapons, ammunition, and equipment used in connection w/ them

a branch of the armed forces dealing w/ the supply and storage of weapons, ammunition, and related equipment
ordonnance
the systematic or orderly arrangement of parts, esp in art and architecture
ordure
excrement; dung

something regarded as vile or abhorrent
oread
(in Grk and Rom. mythology) a nymph believed to inhabit mountains
organon
an instrument of thought, esp a means of reasoning or a system of logic
oriel
a projection from the wall of a building, typically supported from the ground or by corbels

"oriel window" = window in such a structure

a projecting window, often on an upper story; a bay window
orient
special luster of a pearl of the finest quality

(of the sun, daylight, etc.) rising

lustrous (of preious stones)
orienteering
a competitive sport in which participants find their way to various checkpoints across rough country w/ the aid of a map and compass, the winner being the one w/ the lowest elapsed time
orison
a prayer
orogeny
(geology) a process in which a section o the earth's crust is folded and deformed by lateral compression to form a mountain range

a period of mountain building
orography
the branch of physical geography dealing w/ mountains
orotund
(of the voice or phrasing) full, round, and imposing

(of writing, style, or expression) pompous; pretentious
Orphism
a mystic religion of ancient Greece, orig. 6/7th C BCE and based on the now lost poems of Orpheus, emphasizing the necessity for individuals to rid themselves of the evil part of their nature by ritual and moral purification throughout a series of reincarnations

a short-lived art movement (c. 1912) w/in cubism, pioneered by a group of Fr. painters (inc. Delaunay, Leger) and emphasizing the lyrical use of color rather than the austere intellectual cubism of Picasso, Braque, and Gris.
ort (orts)
a scrap or remainder of food from a meal

anything left over.
orthodontics
treatment of irregularities in the teeth (esp of alignment and occlusion) and jaws, including the use of braces.
orthopedics
the branch of medicine dealing w/ the correction of deformities of bones or muscles.
orthotics
the branch of medicine that deals w/ the provision and use of artificial devices such as splints and braces.

a treatment prescribing such a device, esp for the foot.

a device used for such treatment.
oscitation
yawning; drowsiness

inattention; negligence
osculate
kiss
osmic
relating to odors or the sense of smell
osmosis
the process of gradual or unconscious assimilation of ideas, knowledge, etc.
osseous
consisting of or turned into bone; ossified
ostensible
stated or appearing to be true, but not necessarily so.
osteopathy
branch of medical practice that emphasizes the treatment of medical disorders through the manipulation and massage of the bones, joints, and muscles.
otiose
serving no practical purpose or result

indolent; idle
outre
unusual and startling: "in 1975 the suggestion was considered outre--today it is orthodox"
overblown
(of a flower) past its prime
overture
an introduction to something more substantial

an orchestral piece at the beginning of an opera, suite, play, oratorio, or other extended composition
overweening
showing excessive confidence or pride
ovine
of, relating to, or resembling sheep
oviparous
(of a bird, etc) producing young by means of eggs that are hatched after they have been laid by the parent.
ovoviviparous
(of an animal) producing young by means of eggs that are hatched w/in the body of the parent, as in some snakes.
oxide
(chemistry) a binary compound of oxygen w/ another element or group
ozone
fresh, invigorating air, esp that blowing onto the shore from the sea