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52 Cards in this Set

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The systematic way in which a person thinks, reasons, and uses language
cognition
What does cognition involve?
-sensory input (sights, sounds)
-past experiences
-awareness of the environment
-emotions
the process of recognizing and interpreting sensory stimuli
perceiving
the process of sorting, organizing and categorizing information
thinking
the capability of the nervous system to store memories
learning
the ability of recalling a thought at least once
memory
What are some factors enhancing normal cognitive function?
-adequate blood flow
-nutrition and metabolism
-fluid and electrolyte balance
-sleep and rest
T or F: REM is particularly important for memory
true
exhibiting behaviors or cues reflecting motivation and ability to learn
desire to learn
social approval and self esteem motive
social motive
compentency and achievement motive
Task Mastery
meeting physiological needs motive
Physical motive
What are some factors inhibiting learning?
-emotional factors
-physiological factors
-cultural factors
-psychomotor ability
adherence to the recommended plan
compliance
abnormal state of complete or partial unawareness of self or environment. Depressed cerebral function. The inability to respond to sensory stimuli
unconsciousness
deepest state of unconsciousness from which the patient cannot be aroused even with powerful stimuli
coma
state in which there is absence of alertness, cognition, and voluntary movement that is readily reversible by an auditory, visual, or tactile stimulus
sleep
reduced awareness; failure to comprehend the surroundings; disoriented to time; inability to follow instructions-even simple ones; misinterpretation of events and stimuli; imparied judgements
confusion
state characterized by confusion, fear, irritability, agitation, hyperactivity, marked illusions, hallucinations, and delusions
delirium
beliefs that are not based in reality and reflect an unconscious need or fear (believing the hospital food is poisoned)
delusion
sensory impressions that are based on internal stimulations and have no basis in reality. Hearing voices when no one is there
hallucinations
demonstrated by wakefulness but inability to follow objects or lights, does not turn eyes toward a noise and does not speak
Pseudo-wakeful state
diminished alertness that can extend from semi-comatose to deep coma
comatose states
not oriented to time, place, or person
disoriented
a defect in the normal function of sensory reception, perception, or both, of one or more of the senses
sensory deficit
a decrease in or lack of menaingful stimuli
sensory deprivation
receives multiple sensory stimuli and cannot disregard or selectively ignore some stimuli
sensory overload
false interpitation or misleading impression of reality
illusion
What are the five senses?
1. sight (visual)
2. hearing (auditory)
3. taste (gustatory)
4. smell (olfactory)
5. touch (sensory)
awareness of our organs in our body
visceral sensation
awareness of the placement of body parts
kinetic sensation
an awareness and interpretation of the sensory stimuli into meaningful information
sensory perception
an agent or act that stimulates a nerve receptor
stimulus
a nerve cell that coverts the stimulus into an impulse
receptor
the pathway the impulse travels to the brain
impulse conduction
interpretation of the impulse
perception
this monitors sleep and regulates all incoming stimuli; is the link b/t spinal cord and brain
reticular activating system
an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage. It is whatever the experiencing person says it is
Pain
receptors that transmit pain
nociceptors
the process of pain perception
nociception
Process of nociception
the injury
transduction
Process of nociception
-A delta fibers-large, sharp, acute, fast pain
-C fibers-small, slow
transmission
Process of nociception
How to change pain level
modulation
type of pain:
bone, joint, muscle, skin, or sonnective tissue, Well localized
somatic
type of pain:
organs. Poorly localized
visceral
type of pain:
nerve. Pain moves
Neuropathic
the past experiences of pain and pain control
Pain history
the point at which an increasing intensity of stimuli is felt as painful
Pain threshold
What are some characteristics of acute pain?
-short term
-episodic
-physiological changes
What are some characteristics of chronic pain?
-long term, baseline pain
-breakthrough pain
-NO objective physiological signs
What are some words to describe pain?
burning, aching, tender, shooting, tingling, cramping, radiating, pressure, throbbing, numbness
small needles inserted at specific body points
acupuncture