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21 Cards in this Set

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verb

1 : shelter; conceal
*2 : establish; settle
ensconce
verb

*1 : to examine closely and minutely
2 : to make a scrutiny
scrutinize
from the Latin verb "scrutari" (meaning "to search" or "to examine"), which in turn probably comes from "scruta" (meaning "trash," or more specifically "a mixture of worthwhile articles and trash").
noun

*1 : evasion of straightforward action or clear-cut statement : equivocation
2 : desertion of a cause, position, party, or faith
tergiversation
The Latin verb "tergiversari" means "to show reluctance," and it comes from the combination of "tergum," meaning "back," and "versare," meaning "to turn."
noun

: keenness and depth of perception, discernment, or discrimination especially in practical matters
acumen
traces to the verb "acuere," which means "to sharpen" and which derives from "acus," the Latin word for "needle."
noun

*1 : an exhibition or display of optical effects and illusions
2 a : a constantly shifting complex succession of things seen or imagined b : a scene that constantly changes
3 : a bizarre or fantastic combination, collection, or assemblage
phantasmagoria
traced back to Latin "phantasma" ("a product of fantasy") and ultimately to Greek "phantazein," which means "to present to the mind."
adjective

1 : hesitant in acting or speaking through lack of self-confidence
*2 : reserved, unassertive
diffident
opposite of confident; trace to the Latin verb "fidere," which means "to trust." and the prefix "dis-," meaning "the absence of,"
noun

: glowing and warmly enthusiastic praise; also : an expression of this
encomium
Greek formed this particular expression of praise and named it an "enkōmion," from their terms "en," meaning "in," and "kōmos," meaning "celebration."
adjective

1 : firmly established by long persistence
*2 : confirmed in a habit : habitual
inveterate
ultimately comes from Latin "vetus," which means "old," and which led to the Latin verb "inveterare" ("to age").
noun

1 : a seal used especially as a mark of official approval
*2 : a feature or quality conferring prestige; also : prestige
cachet
from the Middle French verb "cacher," meaning "to press" or "to hide."
noun

: a fitting return or recompense
meed
appeared in the Old English classic Beowulf; Old English form, "mēd"
adjective

: refusing to submit to authority
recusant
from the Latin verb "recusare," meaning "reject" or "oppose."
verb

1 : to make confused : puzzle, bewilder
2 : to occupy the attention of : distract, absorb
*3 : to cause to have feelings of wry or tolerant amusement
bemuse
originally referred to being inspired by or devoted to one of the Muses; however it was misinterpreted by many in a poem by the British poet Alexander Pope
noun

: an organism that lives under extreme environmental conditions (as in a hot spring or ice cap)
extremophile
comes from combination of "extreme" and the Greek work for "love;" usually refers to Archaebacteria that can stand very high or low temps
verb

1 : to give a false appearance of : induce as a false impression
*2 : to assert as if true : pretend
feign
Latin ancestor: the verb "fingere," which also means "to shape." related to word "figure" and "fiction"
noun

: divination by the appearance or motion of liquids (as water)
hydromancy
to derive ultimately from the Greek words for "water" ("hydōr") and "divination" ("manteia")
adjective

*1 : including a multitude of individuals : populous
2 : existing in a great multitude
3 : existing in or consisting of innumerable elements or aspects
multitudinous
from Latin "multus," meaning "many."
adjective

: frenzied, frantic
frenetic
comes from Greek "phrenitis," a term describing an inflammation of the brain. "Phrān" is the Greek word for "mind," a root you will recognize in "schizophrenic." closely related to "frantic"
noun

: a shelter occupied during the winter by a dormant animal
hibernaculum
come from Latin "hibernare," meaning "to pass the winter."
noun

: a period of physiologically enforced dormancy between periods of activity
diapause
from the Greek word "diapausis," meaning "pause," may have been coined by the entomologist William Wheeler in 1893.
verb

1 : to reduce the violence of (a disease); also : to ease (symptoms) without curing the underlying disease
*2 : to cover by excuses and apologies
3 : to moderate the intensity of
palliate
noun

1: syndicated material supplied especially to weekly newspapers in matrix or plate form
*2: standardized, formulaic, or hackneyed language
boilerplate