Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/32

Click to flip

32 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
course of internal carotid artery
1. Begins at the bifurcation of the common carotid a. 2. Ascends the neck and perforates the base of the skull by passing through the carotid canal of the temporal bone 3. Runs through the cavernous sinus; perforates the dura and arachnoid 4. Enters the subarachnoid space and turns posteriorly to the region of the anterior perforated substance and divides into the anterior and middle cerebral arteries
Branches of internal carotid
a.Ophthalmic .b. Posterior communicating c.Choroidal d.Anterior cerebral e. Middle cerebral
areas supplied by Ophthalmic a.
the eye and other orbital structures; frontal area of scalp and ethmoid and frontal sinuses
areas supplied by Choroidal a
enters inferior horn of the lateral ventricle and ends in the choroid plexus; small branches to the crus cerebri, internal capsule
areas supplied by Anterior cerebral
branches supply most of the medial surface of the cerebral cortex as far back as the parieto-occipital sulcus; "leg" area of precentral gyrus; other branches pierce the anterior perforated substance to help supply parts of the lentiform and caudate nuclei and the internal capsule
areas supplied by Middle cerebral a.
branches supply entire lateral surface of the hemisphere (except dorsal ridge area, occipital pole and the inferolateral surface of the hemisphere); very important clinically because it supplies most of the "motor" cortex (Brodmann's Area 4), and in the dominant hemisphere both Broca and Wernicke's Areas; other branches enter the anterior perforated substance to supply the lentiform and caudate nuclei and the internal capsule
course of vertebral artery
1. A branch of the first part of the subclavian a.
2.Ascends the neck by passing through the foramina in the transverse processes of the upper six cervical vertebra
3. Enters the skull through the foramen magnum
4. Pierces the dura and arachnoid to enter the subarachnoid space
5.Continues to the lower border of the pons where it joins the vessel of the opposite side to form the basilar a.
Branches of the cranial portion of the vertebral a
A. Meningeal branches B. Posterior spinal a.: may arise from the vertebral a. or the posterior inferior cerebellar a.; descends as two branches C. Anterior spinal a.: single a. D. Posterior inferior cerebellar a.: E. Medullary a.:
areas supplied by Meningeal branches of vertebral artery
supply bone and dura in the posterior cranial fossa
course of Posterior spinal a.:
may arise from the vertebral a. or the posterior inferior cerebellar a.; descends as two branches
areas supplied by. Anterior spinal a.:
single a. descending on anterior surface of the medulla and spinal cord
areas supplied by Posterior inferior cerebellar a
largest branch of the vertebral; courses between the medulla and the cerebellum; supplies the inferior surface of the vermis, central nuclei of the cerebellum and the under surface of the cerebellar hemispheres; also supplies part of the medulla and the choroid plexus of the fourth ventricle
areas supplied by Medullary a.
small branches to the medulla
course of Basilar artery
formed by the union of the two vertebral arteries; at the upper border of the pons, it divides into the two posterior cerebral arteries
Branches of the basilar a.
1 Pontine a. //
2 Labrynthine a. //
3 superior cerebellar a //
4 anterior inferior cerebellar a. //
5 posterior cerebral a
branches and areas supplied by Pontine a.
small vessels supplying pons
course and areas supplied by labyrinthine a.:
accompanies the facial (VII) and vestibulocochlear (VIII) nerves into the internal acoustic meatus and supplies the internal ear
areas supplied by Anterior inferior cerebellar a.:
supplies anterior and inferior parts of the cerebellum; pons and upper part of the medulla
areas supplied by Superior cerebellar a.:
supplies superior surface of the cerebellum, pons, pineal body and the superior medullary velum
areas supplied by Posterior cerebral a.:
supplies inferolateral surface of the temporal lobe and the lateral and medial surfaces of the occipital lobe; also supplies part of the thalamus, lentiform nucleus, midbrain, pineal; a choroidal branch enters the inferior horn of the lateral ventricles and supplies the choroid plexus
brain veins characteristics
A. Brain veins have no muscular tissue in their very thin walls and they possess no valves B. They emerge from the brain and lie in the subarachnoid space C. Cerebral veins can be divided into external and internal, all of which eventually pierce the arachnoid and meningeal layer of dura to drain into the dural venous sinuses
List the external cerebral veins
uperior cerebral veins; Superficial middle cerebral vein; Deep middle cerebral vein
Course, function of Superior cerebral veins:
pass upward over the lateral surface of the cerebral hemisphere and empty into the superior sagittal sinus
Course, function of Superficial middle cerebral vein
drains the lateral surface of the cerebral hemisphere; runs inferiorly in the lateral sulcus and empties into the cavernous sinus
course, function of Deep middle cerebral vein
drains the insula; joined by the anterior cerebral and striate veins to form the basal vein; the basal vein ultimately joins the Great Cerebral Vein (of Galen) which drains into the straight sinus
Course of Internal cerebral veins
1) Formed by the union of the thalamostriate vein and the choroid vein at the interventricular foramen (of Monro) 2) Run posteriorly in the tela choroidea of the third ventricle and unite beneath the corpus callosum to form the Great Cerebral Vein (of Galen) which empties into the straight sinus
Corpus striatum and internal capsule (deep structures of the cerebral hemispheres) blood supply
Supplied mainly the medial and lateral striate branches of the middle cerebral a.
Thalamus blood supply
Supplied mainly by branches of the posterior communicating, basilar, and posterior cerebral arteries
Midbrain blood supply, drainage
1 Supplied mainly by posterior cerebral, superior cerebellar and the basilar arteries 2. Drained by veins that open into the basal or great cerebral vein
Pons blood supply, drainage
1 Supplied mainly by the pontine branches of the basilar a., and the anterior inferior, and superior cerebellar arteries 2.Drained by veins that open into the basal vein, cerebellar veins, or neighboring venous sinuses
Medulla blood supply, drainage
1. Supplied mainly the vertebral, anterior and posterior spinal, posterior inferior cerebellar, and basilar arteries 2. Drained by veins that open into the spinal veins and the neighboring venous sinuses
Cerebellum blood supply, drainage
1. Supplied by the superior cerebellar, anterior inferior cerebellar, and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries 2. Drained by veins that empty into the great cerebral vein or adjacent venous sinuses