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6 Cards in this Set

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What is the 19th Amendment?
August 2000 marked the 80th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment to the . The amendment guarantees all American women the right to vote. Achieving this milestone required a lengthy and difficult struggle; victory took decades of agitation and protest. Beginning in the mid-19th century, several generations of woman suffrage supporters lectured, wrote, marched, lobbied, and practiced civil disobedience to achieve what many Americans considered a radical change of the Constitution. Few early supporters lived to see final victory in 1920.

Passed by Congress June 4, 1919, and ratified on August 18, 1920, the 19th amendment granted women the right to vote.
Who were the Flappers?
In the 1920s, a new woman was born. She smoked, drank, danced, and voted. She cut her hair, wore make-up, and went to petting parties. She was giddy and took risks. She was a flapper. In the 1920s, flappers broke away from the Victorian image of womanhood. They dropped the corset, chopped their hair, dropped layers of clothing to increase ease of movement, wore make-up, created the concept of dating, and became a sexual person. They created what many consider the "new" or "modern" woman.
Who was Luther Hodges?
(9 March 1898 – 6 October 1974) was the Democratic governor of the state of North Carolina from 1954 to 1961 and United States Secretary of Commerce from 1961 to 1965. Hodges worked his way from mill-work to executive positions in industry; at the same time, he was an active supporter of vocational education programs in North Carolina. He was elected the state's lieutenant governor in 1952 and succeeded to the position of governor in November of 1954 upon the death of Governor William B. Umstead. Two years later, he was elected on his own to a four-year term as governor. Because North Carolina had a one-term limit for governors at that time, Hodges had the longest continuous tenure in the office until Jim Hunt succeeded in getting the state constitution changed. During his time in office, Governor Hodges promoted industrialization and education, while attempting to limit racial tension. Cole denounced the Ku Klux Klan after its harassment of the Lumbee led to violence at the Battle of Hayes Pond.
What is the 19th Amendment?
August 2000 marked the 80th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment to the . The amendment guarantees all American women the right to vote. Achieving this milestone required a lengthy and difficult struggle; victory took decades of agitation and protest. Beginning in the mid-19th century, several generations of woman suffrage supporters lectured, wrote, marched, lobbied, and practiced civil disobedience to achieve what many Americans considered a radical change of the Constitution. Few early supporters lived to see final victory in 1920.

Passed by Congress June 4, 1919, and ratified on August 18, 1920, the 19th amendment granted women the right to vote.
Who were the Flappers?
In the 1920s, a new woman was born. She smoked, drank, danced, and voted. She cut her hair, wore make-up, and went to petting parties. She was giddy and took risks. She was a flapper. In the 1920s, flappers broke away from the Victorian image of womanhood. They dropped the corset, chopped their hair, dropped layers of clothing to increase ease of movement, wore make-up, created the concept of dating, and became a sexual person. They created what many consider the "new" or "modern" woman.
Who was Luther Hodges?
(9 March 1898 – 6 October 1974) was the Democratic governor of the state of North Carolina from 1954 to 1961 and United States Secretary of Commerce from 1961 to 1965. Hodges worked his way from mill-work to executive positions in industry; at the same time, he was an active supporter of vocational education programs in North Carolina. He was elected the state's lieutenant governor in 1952 and succeeded to the position of governor in November of 1954 upon the death of Governor William B. Umstead. Two years later, he was elected on his own to a four-year term as governor. Because North Carolina had a one-term limit for governors at that time, Hodges had the longest continuous tenure in the office until Jim Hunt succeeded in getting the state constitution changed. During his time in office, Governor Hodges promoted industrialization and education, while attempting to limit racial tension. Cole denounced the Ku Klux Klan after its harassment of the Lumbee led to violence at the Battle of Hayes Pond.